Monday, November 15, 2021

Your AALS Comparative Law Dance Card

AALS LogoThe Association of American Law Schools (AALS) will hold its 2022 Annual Meeting online from January 5-9, 2022. Most U.S. law schools have paid a flat-rate fee that allows their faculty to register and participate in the Annual Meeting at no individual costs to the professor. You must register by December 22, 2021. The AALS website has a full list of law schools whose faculty members can take advantage of this opportunity to participate in the Annual Meeting.

To assist blog readers who will be attending the AALS Annual Meeting, we'll posts lists (we're calling them "dance cards") of international and comparative law panels and events. We hope you find it helpful.

 

AALS 2022 Annual Meeting

Comparative Law Dance Card

January 5-9, 2022 (Online)

All times are Eastern

 

Wednesday, January 5, 2022

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.  Comparative Law, Co‐Sponsored by East Asian Law & Society, International Human Rights, and Law, Medicine and Health Care, Did Democracy Stumble? Pandemic Lessons from Around the Globe

3:10 – 4:25 p.m.  Comparative Law, Works in Progress on Comparative Law

Thursday, January 6, 2022

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Law in the Americas, Co‐Sponsored by Comparative Law, International and Comparative Legal Research

3:10 p.m. – 4:25 p.m. Legal History, Co‐Sponsored by Comparative Law, Using Historical Context Across the Law School Curriculum in Response to January 6th, 2021

Friday, January 7, 2022

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Comparative Law Section Networking Session

Saturday, January 8, 2022

3:10 – 4:25 p.m. East Asian Law & Society, Co‐Sponsored by Comparative Law, Democracy on the Edge

Sunday, January 9, 2022

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Real Estate Transactions Co‐Sponsored by Comparative Law, International Real Estate

(mew)

November 15, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 5, 2021

Hilary Charlesworth Elected to the International Court of Justice

Congratulations to Hilary Charlesworth of Australia who was elected to the International Court of Justice today. Justice Charlesworth is an international law professor and award-winning scholar and has served as an ad hoc judge for the court on two previous occasions. She is only the fifth female to be elected to the Court in its history.

(cgb)

November 5, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 31, 2021

Mary Campbell Gallagher (1938-2021)

Mary Campbell GallagherWe are saddened by news that Dr. Mary Campbell Gallagher died last Monday after a year-long illness.

The company she founded, BarWrite and BarWrite Press in New York, was recognized in 2014 with a Global Legal Skills Award for the company's early and thoughtful recognition of the special bar exam preparation needs of lawyers and law students who spoke English as a second language. Dr. Campbell Gallagher was a regular attendee and presenter at Global Legal Skills Conferences around the world.

Outside of the bar preparation field, Dr. Campbell Gallagher was the Founder and President of the Save Paris / International Coalition for the Preservation of Paris. She was the editor of a forthcoming book called "Paris Without Skyscrapers."

Dr. Campbell Gallagher had received her B.A. from New York University, her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, and her J.D. from Harvard Law School. We sometimes met at the Harvard Club in New York, where we would discuss legal English training programs and bar preparation for non-U.S.-trained lawyers.

(mew)

October 31, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 29, 2021

International Law Weekend

As we've written before, at this blog EVERY weekend is an international law weekend.

But this weekend is the "International Law Weekend" (ILW), an annual conference organized by the American Branch of the International Law Association (AmBranch or ABILA), with the assistance of the International Law Students Association (ILSA, the fine people who bring you the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition).

ABILA usually presents ILW each October in New York City, but this year's ILW is entirely online. This two-and-a-half-day conference features over 30 panels, and many of the world’s leading international lawyers, law professors, and diplomats participate. We understand that the audience this year includes legal professionals and law students from more than 80 countries. The conference also includes breakout rooms for ABILA Committees.

The conference is free for law students. 

We congratulate ABILA President Professor Leila Nadya Sadat, the ABILA officers, the conference staff and organizers, and the dozens of panelists participating in ILW.

(mew)

October 29, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 22, 2021

United States is Elected to UN Human Rights Council

Earlier this month, the United States was reelected to the United Nations Human Rights Council after a three year absence. The term of the United States will begin in 2022, along with Cameroon, Eritrea, and the United Arab Emirates. The U.S. State Department issued this press release

The UN Human Rights Council is "an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe and for addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them."

(cgb)

October 22, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 12, 2021

International Law Weekend - Early Bird Registration

At this blog, EVERY weekend is an international law weekend.

But the ILW is an annual not-to-be-missed event organized by the American Branch of the International Law Association (AmBranch or ABILA), with the assistance of the International Law Students Association (ILSA, the fine people who bring you the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition).

Each October, the American Branch presents International Law Weekend (ILW) in New York City. This two-and-a-half-day conference features over 30 panels, and many of the world’s leading international lawyers and diplomats participate. In recent years, keynote luncheon speakers have included the president of the American Society of International Law and the Legal Adviser to the U.S. Department of State. Gala receptions have been hosted by the Finnish, Belgian, British, and Singapore missions to the United Nations.

Recent ILWs have attracted an audience of over 1,200 practitioners, academics, U.N. diplomats, business leaders, federal and state government officials, NGO leaders, journalists, students, and interested citizens. Registration for ILW is very reasonably priced as a service to our members. It is free for students. Sponsorship by law firms, universities, and interested practitioners is welcomed and recognized.

International Law Weekend 2021 is scheduled for October 28-30, 2021. And this year it's online, of course, which means you can attend more easily.

Students get to go for free, others pay a registration fee. There's an early bird rate that expires on September 15. Click here for more information.

In addition to the substantive panels, there will be breakout rooms for networking and catching up with international law colleagues. One of those rooms will be for the ABILA Committee on Teaching International Law.

Mark E. Wojcik (mew)

Co-Chair, ABILA Committee on Teaching International Law

 

September 12, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 1, 2021

Scribes Brief-Writing Award

If your law school won a best-brief award in a regional or national moot court competition during the 2020-2021 academic year, you can submit that winning brief to be considered for the 2021 Scribes Brief-Writing Award.

Scribes--The American Society of Legal Writers--established the Brief-Writing Award to recognize the Best of the Best. It selects the best brief from moot court competitions held in the previous academic year. Submissions in past years have frequently included briefs that won the best-brief award in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition.

Nominations for the 2021 Scribes Brief-Writing Award can be submitted until October 4, 2021. 

Instructions for submitting a brief for the Scribes competition:

1.      By October 4, 2021, email an electronic copy of the winning brief to scribeslegalwriters@gmail.com         

2.     The subject line of the email should indicate that it’s a Scribes brief nomination from “___ Law School" (the students’ law school).

3.     The body of the e-mail must include the following information:

  • Name of the moot court competition
  • Place where the brief was named best brief (e.g., “finals,” “SW regional”)
  • Names of the students who wrote the brief
  • Students’ school
  • Name of students’ advisor or coach, if any

4.     The brief itself cannot include any information that identifies the student authors or their school. Please check the cover page, signature pages, and headers or footers.

5.     Submit the brief as a PDF file if possible, although they will accept Word format if necessary.

6.     The brief should be submitted as a single file.

The award committee will consider briefs from the 2020-2021 academic year, and the award winners will be announced early next year. If you have any questions, please contact Philip Johnson, Executive Director of Scribes, at scribeslegalwriters@gmail.com.

(mew)

September 1, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 28, 2021

Reminder of Call for Papers: AALS Section on International Law

The Section on International Law of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for a program at the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting to be held virtually between Jan. 5-9, 2002 (exact time and date of the panel TBA).

The topic of the program is The Challenges and Opportunities of Teaching International Law Responses to the Climate Change Crisis. This panel will address the Biden Administration’s efforts to bring the United States back into the Paris Agreement and to prioritize energy justice in its climate change plan. Much additional work will need to be done globally to reach the goals outlined in the Biden plan. The panel discussion will focus on the very pressing issue of the international law responses to climate change, with a particular focus on how to best teach about these emerging developments and justice issues, and to provide opportunities for experiential engagement of our students to help make a difference.

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts that address any of numerous substantive and pedagogical issues related to the way in which the United States can better address climate change through law-making.

The presenter chosen through this call for papers will join a distinguished panel featuring the following speakers:

Moderator: Hari Osofsky, Dean and Professor of Law, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and panel of invited speakers.

Speakers:

Deepa Badrinarayana, Professor of Law, Chapman University School of Law

Lisa Benjamin, Assistant Professor of Law, Lewis & Clark Law School

David Hunter, Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law

Co-sponsoring sections: Environmental Law and Natural Resources and Energy Law

Eligibility

Per AALS policy, only full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit a paper to a call for papers. The following are ineligible: faculty at fee-paid law schools, international, visiting (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school) and adjunct faculty members, graduate students, and non-law school faculty.

Untenured faculty members and persons who have not had the opportunity to present a paper at an AALS Annual Meeting previously are particularly encouraged to submit papers/abstracts. 

Registration fee

The selected Call for Paper participant is responsible for paying his or her AALS annual meeting registration fee.

Form and length of submission

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts dealing with any aspect of the foregoing topic.  Detailed abstracts should be comprehensive enough to allow the committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of papers proposed.

Papers may be accepted for publication but must not be published prior to the Annual Meeting.

Deadline and submission method

Papers and abstracts must be submitted electronically to: Dean Hari Osofsky, at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, hariosofsky@law.northwestern.edu. The subject of the email should read: “Submission for AALS Section on International Law.”

The initial review of the papers and abstracts will be blind and will be conducted by members of the section’s executive committee.  In order to facilitate blind review, please identify yourself and your institutional affiliation only in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript, and not in the manuscript itself.  The submitting author is responsible for taking any steps necessary to redact self-identifying text or footnotes.    

The deadline for submission is September 7, 2021.

The author of the selected paper/abstract will be notified by September 24, 2021.

(cgb)

August 28, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 21, 2021

CFP: Comparative Law Works-In-Progress Workshop (Online Event)

Annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop

February 3 – February 5, 2022

University of Illinois College of Law

Announcement and Call for Papers

 

Co-Organized and Co-Hosted by Jacqueline Ross (University of Illinois College of Law),

Kim Lane Scheppele (Princeton University), and

Jacques deLisle (University of Pennsylvania Law School)

 

Co-sponsored by the University of Illinois College of Law,

Princeton University’s Center for Human Values,

University of Pennsylvania Law School,

and the American Society of Comparative Law

Comparative law scholars are invited to consider submitting a paper to the next annual Comparative Law Work-in-Progress Workshop, which will be held online, as a Zoom conference, February 3-5, 2022, and hosted by the University of Illinois College of Law (with Princeton University and the University of Pennsylvania Law School co-hosting.)  Each of the seven selected presenters will be allocated a 75-minute session to get feedback on their work.  These sessions will be scattered over the three-day period and will be scheduled to accommodate the presenters’ and commentators’ time zones.   Each presenter will be expected to attend all of the other presenters’ sessions where time zone permits.

Interested authors should submit papers to Jacqueline Ross at jeross1@illinois.edu by December 1, 2021.  The selection committee will inform authors of our decision by December 18, 2021. The conference will run from Thursday, February 3 until Saturday afternoon, February 5, and will be held entirely online.   

The annual workshop continues to be an important forum in which comparative law work in progress can be explored among colleagues in a serious and thorough manner that will be truly helpful to the authors.  "Work in progress" means scholarship that has reached a stage at which it is substantial enough to merit serious discussion and critique but that has not yet appeared in print (and can still be revised after the workshop, if  already accepted for publication.)  It includes law review articles, book chapters, and other appropriate genres.  All fields of law and all jurisdictions are fair game.   

The organizers ask for one contribution per author, limited to a maximum of 15,000 words (including notes), or, if the paper (or book chapter) is longer, to indicate which 15,000-word portion they would like to have read and discussed.  Shorter papers are, of course, eagerly welcomed.  

The objective is not only to provide an opportunity for the discussion of scholarly work but also to create an opportunity for comparative lawyers to meet and discuss comparative law in the company of sympathetic others, both in the sessions and outside (as Zoom permits). We hope that this will create synergy that fosters more dialogue, cooperation, and an increased sense of coherence for the discipline of comparative law.

Hat tip to Margaret Woo, Chair of the AALS Section on Comparative Law

(mew)

August 21, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 16, 2021

Saudi Arabia's Reservation to the Convention on the Rights of the Child

Saudi Arabia recently sentenced to death Abdullah al-Huwaiti, a boy who was only 14 years of age at the time of the crime he was charged with. The court ignored evidence that his initial confession was obtained only after police interrogators had beaten him, deprived him of sleep, and "told him that his mother and sisters had been arrested and would not be released unless he confessed." Asmaa al-Omar & Ben Hubbard, Given a Death Sentence For a Crime at 14 Casts Doubt on Saudi Reforms, N.Y. Times, Aug. 14, 2020, at A6. The court also ignored cellphone alibi evidence that indicated he was not at the crime scene but at the waterfront. See id.

Article 37(a) of the Convention on the Rights of the Child prohibits state parties from imposing capital punishment or life imprisonment without possibility of release for offenses committed by persons below 18 years of age.

Saudi Arabia is a party to the Convention on the Rights of the Child. When it ratified the CRC in 1996, it entered “reservations with respect to all such articles as are in conflict with the provisions of Islamic law.” 1996 U.N.T.S. 316.

Objections to this reservation were made in 1997 by Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, and Sweden.

(mew)

August 16, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

UIC is Hiring

The University of Illinois Chicago School of Law, Chicago's only public law school, is seeking entry-level or near entry-level candidates for two full-time faculty positions in the tenure/tenure-track at all ranks to teach a combination of courses needed in the law school curriculum. The law school’s primary needs are Civil Procedure, Property, and Torts and secondary needs are Professional Responsibility, Remedies, Estates and Trust, and Business Associations.

The Law School, which is located in Chicago's downtown Loop, was created by merging a 120- year-old independent law school with a strong history of access, opportunity, and innovation into the University of Illinois Chicago, a Carnegie Research 1 University that is part of the University of Illinois system. The Law School is committed to diversity, access, and opportunity and is excited to recruit individuals who are- or demonstrates the potential to be- exceptional teachers and scholars. For more information about the Law School, visit https://law.uic.edu .

Responsibilities include teaching law students at the Juris Doctor’s and Master’s Levels. Regularly producing high-quality scholarship. Collaborating with other faculty and staff to establish a strong learning environment. Engaging in internal and external service activities, including attending Law School and University meetings, serving on law school and University committees, participating in scholarly organizations or organizations related to the legal profession, delivering presentations, and providing other service to the academy, community, or legal profession.

Candidates must have a Juris Doctor from an ABA-approved law school or its equivalent from a foreign country; record of teaching excellence or demonstrated potential to become an excellent teacher and record of high-quality scholarship or demonstrated potential to produce high-quality scholarship; and demonstrated interested in serving at an urban, public, Research 1 university Excellent writing and communication skills and demonstrated ability to mentor students is highly preferred. Salary, academic rank and tenure/tenure-track will commensurate with experience and qualifications.

For fullest consideration, applicants should submit a letter of intent, current curriculum vitae, and the name of three professional references by August 27, 2021 by applying online at https://jobs.uic.edu/job-board/job-details?jobID=149463 . Initial screening interviews will be conducted via Zoom or a similar platform. Individuals invited to interview for the position should be prepared to submit teaching evaluations for past law-school teaching (whether as an Adjunct, Visiting Professor, or full-time Professor), copies of or links to published scholarship, and, where applicable, copies of promotion reports from current or past law schools. Applicants can continue to apply as a confidential review and screening of candidates will continue until positions are filled.

All full time benefits eligible positions include a comprehensive benefits package which include; Health, Dental, Vision, Life, Disability & AD&D insurance, a defined benefit pension plan as well as paid leave which includes; Vacation, Holiday and Sick.  In addition, we offer tuition waivers for employees and dependents.  Click for a complete list of benefits at: https://www.hr.uillinois.edu/benefits.

The University of Illinois at Chicago is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer that has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity and is particularly interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people. UIC does not discriminate on the basis of sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, national origin, disability, protected Veteran status, age, or any other characteristic protected by law.

(mew)

August 16, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 15, 2021

Stetson International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition

The problem for the 26th Annual Stetson International Environmental Moot Court Competition has just been released. The theme is "Protected Areas and Armed Conflict." 

Click here for the Record for the 2021-22 Stetson International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition.  

Regional Rounds will be held around the world.

Click here for information on regional rounds.

International Finals to be held at Stetson University College of Law in Gulfport, Florida on April 7–9, 2022.

(mew)

August 15, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Stetson International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition

The problem for the 26th Annual Stetson International Environmental Moot Court Competition has just been released. The theme is "Protected Areas and Armed Conflict." 

Click here for the Record for the 2021-22 Stetson International Environmental Law Moot Court Competition.  

Regional Rounds will be held around the world.

Click here for information on regional rounds.

International Finals to be held at Stetson University College of Law in Gulfport, Florida on April 7–9, 2022.

(mew)

August 15, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 13, 2021

Southern Illinois University is Hiring

The School of Law at Southern Illinois University Carbondale seeks applicants for an Assistant Professor position. This is a 9-month, continuing, tenure-track, Assistant Professor position beginning January 1, 2022.

The Assistant Professor will teach Lawyering Skills I and II, which is a required first-year course for all law students, as well as first year or upper-level doctrinal or skills courses depending on the needs of the School of Law and on the successful candidate's area of expertise.  The selected individual will also participate in research/scholarly activity and other duties as assigned by the Dean.

Minimum Qualifications:  A Juris Doctor (JD) degree and a minimum of five years of legal practice.

Preferred Qualifications:  Law teaching experience; prior experience in teaching legal writing; and an outstanding professional record.

Southern Illinois University School of Law is an outstanding, small public law school that provides its students with an optimal mix of theoretical and experiential educational opportunities in a student-centered environment in order to prepare thm for a changing legal profession in a global environment.

Deadline to Apply: 8/26/21 or until filled. Here's the link to apply  https://jobs.siu.edu/job-details?jobid=12367.

(mew)

August 13, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Golden Gate University is Hiring

Golden Gate University School of Law in San Francisco is hiring a Director of Bar Performance and Assessment. For more information, contact Rana Boujaoude (rboujaoude@ggu.edu).

August 13, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 12, 2021

New International Treaty to Improve Pandemic Preparedness and Response

In March of this year, twenty-six nations and the World Health Organization (WHO) called for the development of a new international treaty to improve pandemic preparedness and response in light of the COVID-19. Viruses, like so many modern problems, do not respect borders. Accordingly, better cooperation and coordination among the international community would make prevention and response to future pandemics more effective. 

Since that call, the  roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccines brought some hope that the end of the pandemic was in sight, but the rapid rise of the Delta variant quickly dashed those hopes and further demonstrated the need for international cooperation. According to WHO Director General Tedros, the COVID-19 pandemic is being driven by the lack of sharing of information, technology. and resources.

At the World Health Assembly in May 2021. 194 nations agreed to discuss a new international treaty to address pandemics at a special meeting this coming November and December 2021. The negotiations for this new treaty will be conducted under the auspices of WHO.  While negotiating a new treaty is likely to be a slow process, it is at least a step in the right direction.

(cgb)

August 12, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 3, 2021

Call for Papers: AALS Section on International Law

The Section on International Law of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS) is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for a program at the AALS 2022 Annual Meeting to be held virtually between Jan. 5-9, 2002 (exact time and date of the panel TBA).

The topic of the program is The Challenges and Opportunities of Teaching International Law Responses to the Climate Change Crisis. This panel will address the Biden Administration’s efforts to bring the United States back into the Paris Agreement and to prioritize energy justice in its climate change plan. Much additional work will need to be done globally to reach the goals outlined in the Biden plan. The panel discussion will focus on the very pressing issue of the international law responses to climate change, with a particular focus on how to best teach about these emerging developments and justice issues, and to provide opportunities for experiential engagement of our students to help make a difference.

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts that address any of numerous substantive and pedagogical issues related to the way in which the United States can better address climate change through law-making.

The presenter chosen through this call for papers will join a distinguished panel featuring the following speakers:

Moderator: Hari Osofsky, Dean and Professor of Law, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law and panel of invited speakers.

Speakers:

Deepa Badrinarayana, Professor of Law, Chapman University School of Law

Lisa Benjamin, Assistant Professor of Law, Lewis & Clark Law School

David Hunter, Professor of Law, American University Washington College of Law

Co-sponsoring sections: Environmental Law and Natural Resources and Energy Law

Eligibility

Per AALS policy, only full-time faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit a paper to a call for papers. The following are ineligible: faculty at fee-paid law schools, international, visiting (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school) and adjunct faculty members, graduate students, and non-law school faculty.

Untenured faculty members and persons who have not had the opportunity to present a paper at an AALS Annual Meeting previously are particularly encouraged to submit papers/abstracts. 

Registration fee

The selected Call for Paper participant is responsible for paying his or her AALS annual meeting registration fee.

Form and length of submission

Eligible faculty members are invited to submit manuscripts or detailed abstracts dealing with any aspect of the foregoing topic.  Detailed abstracts should be comprehensive enough to allow the committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of papers proposed.

Papers may be accepted for publication but must not be published prior to the Annual Meeting.

Deadline and submission method

Papers and abstracts must be submitted electronically to: Dean Hari Osofsky, at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, hariosofsky@law.northwestern.edu. The subject of the email should read: “Submission for AALS Section on International Law.”

The initial review of the papers and abstracts will be blind and will be conducted by members of the section’s executive committee.  In order to facilitate blind review, please identify yourself and your institutional affiliation only in the cover letter accompanying your manuscript, and not in the manuscript itself.  The submitting author is responsible for taking any steps necessary to redact self-identifying text or footnotes.    

The deadline for submission is September 7, 2021.

The author of the selected paper/abstract will be notified by September 24, 2021.

(cgb)

August 3, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, July 31, 2021

Mitchell Hamline is Hiring

Mitchell Hamline School of Law seeks candidates for five tenure-track/tenured faculty positions beginning in July 2022.

They are looking for:

  • Candidates with experience in law practice, law-related professional fields, or academia who are interested in teaching in any field. We have needs in Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Dispute Resolution, Intellectual Property, Legal Writing, Property, Torts, Trial Advocacy, and in our clinical law program.
  • Candidates whose law-practice, teaching, research, or community-service experience has prepared them to contribute to our commitment to diversity and excellence.
  • Candidates who are interested in, and excited about, teaching in their innovative blended learning program (https://mitchellhamline.edu/academics/j-d-enrollment-options/blended-learning-at-mitchell-hamline/).

Candidates must have a J.D. or foreign equivalent degree. They strongly encourage those who attended or taught at the following categories of institutions to apply:

  • Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Law Schools (HBCUs) or Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs)
  • Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institutions (NASNTIs), or Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions (ANNHs)
  • Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs)
  • Asian-American & Native Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)

They welcome candidates whose scholarly approach contributes to the understanding of law's impact on marginalized groups or advances equitable access and diversity in education; and candidates whose teaching incorporates effective strategies for educational advancement of students in underrepresented groups.

Mitchell Hamline is in an historic area of Saint Paul, on the Indigenous homelands of the Dakota Oyate, home to the Penumbra and Fitzgerald theaters, a diverse array of restaurants, and one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world. Just across the river, Minneapolis is the home to the Walker Art Center, First Avenue, the Guthrie Theater, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, and one of the nation's liveliest performing arts scenes. The city was the birthplace of the American Indian Movement and continues to boast one of the largest urban American Indian populations in the country. Eleven federally recognized tribes, including four Dakota and seven Ojibwe tribes, remain within the State of Minnesota. Minneapolis and Saint Paul are among the top cities for the arts and entertainment, active lifestyles, non-profit organizations, and exceptional levels of volunteer engagement.

Candidates must submit: (1) a resume; and (2) a cover letter that discusses their interest in the position and how their law-practice, teaching, research, or community-service experience have prepared them to contribute to our commitment to diversity and excellence.

The committee will consider applications on a rolling basis until all positions are filled. To be considered for our first set of interviews, submit your application by September 1.

For questions about the application process, contact Professor Tom Cobb, Appointments Committee Chair, at tom.cobb@mitchellhamline.edu.

Hat tip to Tom Cobb.

(mew)

July 31, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

Turkish Security Forces Not Immune from Suit for Violence Against Protesters

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit held in Lusik Usoyan et al v. Republic of Turkey  today that a lawsuit against Turkey may proceed despite Turkey's claims of sovereign immunity. The case stems from a violent clash between Turkish security forces and peaceful protesters outside the Turkish Ambassador's residence in Washington, DC in May 2017. Injured protestors brought suit against the Republic  of Turkey. Turkey moved to dismiss the suit on the grounds of foreign sovereign immunity, the political question doctrine, and international comity. The federal district court rejected all three defenses.

On appeal, the Circuit Court held Turkey is not entitled to foreign sovereign immunity because the violent acts of the security forces fall within the tortious act exception of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA). Turkey attempted to claim the discretionary act exception to the tortious act exemption. The Court held that Turkey's actions did not meet the requirements for the discretionary act exemption. It found that under customary international law, a sending state has a right to protect its diplomats and other high officials abroad. However, that right does not include the right to commit criminal assault. Noting that fifteen Turkish security officers were indicated for criminal assault, the Court stated that "the nature of the challenged conduct was not plausibly related to protecting President Erdogan, which is the only authority Turkey had to use force against United States citizens and residents." Thus, Turkey's claim to foreign sovereign immunity fails. The appellate court also upheld the district court's conclusion that neither the political question doctrine nor international comity prevent the case from beings justiciable.

(cgb)

 

July 28, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, July 23, 2021

International Law and the Olympics

OlympicThe 2021 Olympic Games officially begin today, July 23. Watching the Opening Ceremony gives rise to musings on the many areas of international law that impact and are impacted by the Olympic Games. How many can you envision? Of course, there is international sport law, but other areas include international health law, transportation, citizenship and state recognition, human rights, and environmental law. If you want to read more, check out volume 114 of AJIL Unbound (2020). Happy watching and best of luck to all the athletes! 

July 23, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)