Monday, January 12, 2015

Heads I Win, Tails You Lose: Using the Defendant's Trial Testimony to Determine the Guideline Range

In United States v. Norman, the defendant was convicted of wire fraud conspiracy after a jury trial in which he testified in his own behalf. The sentencing court assessed two points against Norman for obstruction, based on the defendant's allegedly perjurious trial testimony. But the judge also determined amount of loss and number of victims based on Norman's testimonial admissions.  On appeal, Norman objected to this as inconsistent and procedurally unreasonable. The Second Circuit unsurprisingly disagreed, noting that the trial judge was free to accept some and reject some of Norman's testimony. Moreover, even though the trial judge found that appellant's admissions regarding amount of loss and number of victims were corroborated by other evidence, the Second Circuit said that this was not necessary. There is no need for a sentencing court to corroborate the defendant's in-court admissions before using them to determine sentencing factors.

(wisenberg)

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2015/01/heads-i-win-tails-you-lose-using-the-defendants-trial-testimony-under-to-determine-the-guideline-ran.html

Sentencing | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef01b7c7349f79970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Heads I Win, Tails You Lose: Using the Defendant's Trial Testimony to Determine the Guideline Range:

Comments

Post a comment