Monday, November 17, 2014

ABA CJS Task Force Releases Proposed Reforms for Federal Sentencing of Economic Crimes

The American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section Task Force on the Reform of Federal Sentencing for Economic Crimes has released its final report.  The report contains significant proposed amendments to the existing federal sentencing guidelines for economic offenses.  As to the general structure, the proposed guidelines fit on a single page and contain only three sections for specific offense characteristics, compared with the nineteen sections currently contained in USSG section 2B1.1.  The three sections in the proposal are “loss,” “culpability,” and “victim impact.”

The loss section contains only six levels of loss, from more than $20,000 to more than $50,000,000.  As currently drafted, a loss of more than $50,000,000 would result in a 14 point increase in the defendant’s offense level.  This is a significant amendment from USSG section 2B1.1, which contain 16 levels of loss, the most significant of which increases a defendant’s base offense level by 30 points.  It is important to note, however, that the Task Force makes clear in its commentary that it is most focused on the proposed structure of the economic crimes guidelines.  The report states, “First, we feel more strongly about the structure of the proposal than we do the specific offense levels we have assigned.  We assigned offense levels in the draft because we think it is helpful in understanding the structure, but the levels have been placed in brackets to indicate their tentative nature.” 

The remaining two specific offense characteristics – Culpability and Victim Impact – are presented in a manner that allows for consideration of various factors before determining where a defendant falls on a range from low to high.  For example, culpability is either “Lowest Culpability,” “Low Culpability,” “Moderate Culpability,” “High Culpability,” or “Highest Culpability.”  According to the commentary, a defendant’s culpability level will depend on an “array of factors,” including the correlation between loss and gain.  In many ways, this portion of the proposal looks similar to the recently adopted Sentencing Council for England and Wales “Fraud, Bribery and Money Laundering Offences – Definitive Guidelines.”  As described in my previous post, these guidelines for England and Wales utilized a “High Culpability,” “Medium Culpability,” and “Low Culpability” model. 

Finally, the proposal contains an interesting offense cap for non-serious first time offenders.  The proposed guidelines state, “If the defendant has zero criminal history points under Chapter 4 and the offense was not ‘otherwise serious’ within the meaning of 28 U.S.C. section 994(j), the offense level shall be no greater than 10 and a sentence other than imprisonment is generally appropriate.”  According to the commentary, in making such a decision, the court should consider (1) the offense as a whole, and (2) the defendant’s individual contribution to the offense. 

As the U.S. Sentencing Commission has stated, addressing federal sentences for economic crimes is one of the Commission’s policy priorities for the 2014-2015 guidelines amendment cycle.  It will be interesting to watch the Commission’s response to the ABA CJS Task Force proposal.  

(LED)

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2014/11/aba-cjs-task-force-releases-proposed-reforms-for-federal-sentencing-of-economic-crimes.html

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