Wills, Trusts & Estates Prof Blog

Editor: Gerry W. Beyer
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Call for Papers: Empirical Analysis of Wealth Transfer Law

ACTEC_FoundationThe University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall) and The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel’s Legal Education Committee are happy to announce that the 8th ACTEC academic symposium will be held on Friday, October 11, 2019. The theme is Empirical Analysis of Wealth Transfer Law.

The event’s goals are to bring together established and emerging scholars and to foster discussion about empirical scholarship about wills, nonprobate transfers, intestacy, inheritance taxation, and related issues. Articles presented at the symposium will consist of those selected from this Call for Papers and those from invited speakers. All papers will be published by the UC Davis Law Review.

If you would like to be considered to present a paper, please email an abstract of no more than two pages toProfessor David Horton (dohorton@ucdavis.edu) by March 1, 2019. The Law Review will notify those selected by March 15, 2019. Please be aware that speakers must submit drafts that are ready for the editing stage of the production process by mid-November 2019.

Speakers will be reimbursed for their reasonable travel expenses (economy airfare, ground transportation, and up to two nights in a local hotel). Speakers will also be invited to dinner on Friday, October 11. Breakfast and lunch will be provided to speakers and attendees on October 11 courtesy of the ACTEC Foundation. Questions about the symposium or this Call for Papers should be directed to David at the email address above or Professor Adam Hirsch (ahirsch@sandiego.edu).

February 7, 2019 in Conferences & CLE, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Apollo's Marc Rowan Gives Wharton $50 Million for Professorships

PennCo-founder of Apollo Global Management LLC, Marc Rowan, is chair of Wharton’s Board of Overseers and co-chair of the More Than Ever campaign, the coalition of the elite that has a philanthropic goal of a billion dollars. Now Rowan will go down as giving Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania its largest donation to date: $50 million. The funds will be used to recruit three Rowan Distinguished Professors, appoint Rowan Fellows, and support the Penn Wharton Business Model. Rowan received both his undergraduate as well his MBA degrees from the University of Pennsylvania.

The gift surpasses the $40 million given by Jon Huntsman Sr. and family in 1998.

See Amanda L. Gordon, Apollo's Marc Rowan Gives Wharton $50 Million for Professorships, Bloomberg, October 2, 2018.

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.) for bringing this article to my attention.

January 1, 2019 in Current Affairs, Current Events, Estate Planning - Generally, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 30, 2018

Call for papers for Modern Studies in the Law of Trusts and Wealth Management 2019

Call for papersThe third conference in the “Modern Studies in the Law of Trusts and Wealth Management” series will take place on 1 & 2nd August 2019 at the Supreme Court, Singapore.  The 2019 conference will be co-organised by the Singapore Academy of Law, the Centre for Cross-Border Commercial Law in Asia Singapore Management University, and the University of York with the support of Trust Law International.

The theme of the conference is “Asian Wealth and the Global Context”. Like its predecessors, the conference will focus on current developments and challenges facing trust law and wealth management in the contemporary political climate, with particular emphasis on the issues raised by the growth of Asian wealth, and the global context in which that is happening.  The conveners of the conference (Richard Nolan (York), Tang Hang Wu (SMU) and Yip Man (SMU)) plan to produce a published volume from papers presented at this conference, and, possibly, a journal special issue. The confirmed speakers include Chan Ee Lin (Deloitte), Thomas Gallanis (Iowa), Jamie Glister (Cambridge), Lusina Ho (HKU), Adam Hofri-Winogradow (Hebrew), Arif Jamal (NUS), James Lee (KCL), Lou Jianbo (Peking), John Mee (Cork), Kelvin Low (CityU/SMU), Tamaruya Masayuki (Rikkyo), Jessica Palmer (Otago), David Pollard (Wilberforce Chambers, London), Tang Hang Wu (SMU), Graham Virgo QC (Cambridge), Yip Man (SMU) and Simone Wong (Kent).

There are some further slots for presenters and the conference organisers are pleased to consider offers for papers. The conference organisers are negotiating with a leading publishing house to produce a book comprising some of the papers presented at the conference. Trust Law International has also agreed to come on board as an official publication for some of the conference papers. Papers presented at the conference will be considered for the book (subject to adherence to the theme and space considerations) and the special issue of the journal (subject to the usual refereeing process and the editors’ discretion).

Presenters from the general call for papers will be expected to meet their own travel costs and to pay the conference registration fee of S$500 (excluding Goods and Services Tax of 7%). Unfortunately, the conference organisers do not have any funding to help meet cost of travel or the registration fee.  The organisers are particularly keen to hear from Asian, women and young scholars in the field. If you would like to offer a paper, please submit a working title and an abstract (of no more than 1500 words) by 28 February 2019 by email to all three of us: Richard Nolan (richard.nolan@york.ac.uk), Tang Hang Wu (hwtang@smu.edu.sg) and Yip Man (manyip@smu.edu.sg ).  Acceptance will be on a rolling basis and the organisers will be grateful for early submissions.

If you would like to attend the conference as a delegate, the conference registration fee is S$700 (excluding Goods and Services Tax of 7%). Please connect with Teh Y-Lyn (teh_y-lyn@sal.org.sg) from the Singapore Academy of Law to indicate your interest and she will gladly give you further information and assist you with registration and other details.

November 30, 2018 in Conferences & CLE, Scholarship, Trusts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 25, 2018

Call for Papers: Empirical Analysis of Wealth Transfer Law

ACTEC

The University of California, Davis School of Law (King Hall) and The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel’s Legal Education Committee are happy to announce that the 8th ACTEC academic symposium will be held on Friday, October 11, 2019. The theme is Empirical Analysis of Wealth Transfer Law. The event’s goals are to bring together established and emerging scholars and to foster discussion about empirical scholarship about wills, nonprobate transfers, intestacy, inheritance taxation, and related issues.

Articles presented at the symposium will consist of those selected from this Call for Papers and those from invited speakers. All papers will be published by the UC Davis Law Review.

If you would like to be considered to present a paper, please email an abstract of no more than two pages to Professor David Horton (dohorton@ucdavis.edu) by March 1, 2019. The Law Review will notify those selected by March 15, 2019. Please be aware that speakers must submit drafts that are ready for the editing stage of the production process by mid-November 2019.

Speakers will be reimbursed for their reasonable travel expenses (economy airfare, ground transportation, and up to two nights in a local hotel). Speakers will also be invited to dinner on Friday, October 11. Breakfast and lunch will be provided to speakers and attendees on October 11 courtesy of the ACTEC Foundation. Questions about the symposium or this Call for Papers should be directed to David at the email address above or Professor Adam Hirsch (ahirsch@sandiego.edu).

November 25, 2018 in Conferences & CLE, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 17, 2018

New Trusts & Estates Collaborative Research Network of Law and Society Association

Trusts & Estates Collaborative Research Network
Law and Society Association
Call for Participation – Deadline October 8, 2018

Organizers of the newly-formed Trusts & Estates Collaborative Research seek proposals that explore any aspect of the law, practice or effects of trusts and estates, broadly defined. Successful proposals likely will bear in some way on succession (also referred to as inheritance) and/or wealth transfers (whether at death or during lifetime, outright or in trust). Subjects of inquiry may involve any aspect of government or social policy with respect to trusts, estates, inheritance, wealth transfer, equity or courts with jurisdiction over these issues.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a Trusts and Estates CRN panel, please  submit a 500-word abstract by Monday, October 8, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. GMT to the CRN chairs, Professor Bridget Crawford (bcrawford at law dot pace dot edu) and Professor Kate Galloway (kgallowa at bond dot edu dot au). The CRN chairs will then attempt to organize the papers into panels with cohesive themes.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working.  We welcome participation from scholars working in any discipline, language, or country.  Although you may submit a proposal to present a paper that is closer to publication, we are especially interested in receiving proposals for works-in-progress that will benefit from discussion that the panels will provide. We welcome participation of junior scholars, those who are untenured or in non-tenure positions, and advanced graduate students, as well as more experienced scholars.

Participants are encouraged to apply multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches in their scholarship. Possible areas in inquiry might include issues related to transfer of wealth between spouses or family members; preferences created for certain types of transfers or transfers to particular classes of individuals; the transfer of wealth to charities or non-profit organizations; generational equity; issues of social and economic inequality; comparative aspects of the law of succession and the law of trusts more broadly; the relationship between/among gender, race, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, immigration, language status, disability and the law of succession and the law of trusts; the socio-linguistics of testation and wealth transfer; access to estate planning justice for low- and middle-income individuals; questions of cultural or group inheritance rights; and similar issues.

If you would like to submit a pre-formed panel, with a chair already named, and affiliate your panel with the Trusts and Estates CRN, please also email the CRN chairs.

In addition to individual paper presentations (to be organized into panels) and pre-formed panels, we also welcome programs that fit other formats permitted by Law and Society such as author-meets-reader sessions, salon sessions, and roundtable session.  If you have an idea that you think would work, we welcome hearing from you with a 500-word proposal.

Please note that LSA rules limit you to participating only once, either as a paper panelist or as a roundtable participant.

We will give preference to proposed Trusts and Estates CRN panelists/participants who agree also to serve as a discussant or discussant/chair for another Trusts and Estates CRN panel (those appearances do not “count” for purposes of the 1 appearance rule). Please indicate your willingness to do so in your proposal.  Your volunteering will help us to create and sustain a supportive global community of trusts and estates scholars. We will take into account expertise and topic preferences. Chairs organize the logistics of the panel, as well as moderate at the conference. Chairs will develop a 100-250 word description of the panel for inclusion in the Law and Society program. Discussants will read at least one assigned paper and prepare a short commentary to offer feedback and serve as a basis for discussion among the panelist and audience members. There may be multiple discussants for the same panel, especially if we are able to create panels that include multi-national perspectives.

Those selected by the Trusts and Estates CRN for participation in a panel or program will be informed no later than October 22, 2018.  Each participant will then need to register through the Law and Society system no later than November 7, 2018 using the panel number we assign.

500-word proposals to participate in a program sponsored by the Trusts and Estates CRN are due Monday, October 8, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. GMT to the CRN chairs, Professor Bridget Crawford (bcrawford at law dot pace dot edu) and Professor Kate Galloway (kgallowa at bond dot edu dot au).

September 17, 2018 in Conferences & CLE, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Interested in Joining Application for Trusts & Estates Collaborative Research Network?

Bridget Crawford (Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, New York) and Kate Galloway (Faculty of Law, Bond University, Australia) are preparing an application to the Law and Society Association for the formation of a Trusts & Estates Collaborative Research Network.  Here's a description of the function of the proposed network:

This CRN will provide a forum within the Law & Society Association for scholars from all disciplines who are interested in the effects on society of the law, practice and effects of succession (also referred to as inheritance) and wealth transfers (whether at death or during lifetime, outright or in trust). Subjects of inquiry may involve any aspect of government or social policy with respect to trusts, estates, inheritance, wealth transfer, equity or courts with jurisdiction over these issues. Participants are encouraged to apply multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to questions across the range of scholarship in this area: issues related to transfer of wealth between spouses or family members; preferences created for certain types of transfers or transfers to particular classes of individuals; the transfer of wealth to charities or non-profit organizations; generational equity; issues of social and economic inequality; comparative aspects of the law of succession and the law of trusts more broadly; the relationship between/among gender, race, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, immigration, language status, disability and the law of succession and the law of trusts; the socio-linguistics of testation and wealth transfer; access to estate planning justice for low- and middle-income individuals; questions of cultural or group inheritance rights; and similar issues.

If you would like to be part of the application for the Trusts & Estates CRN, please send an email to Bridget Crawford (bcrawford at law.pace.edu) and indicate whether you are a current Law & Society member. For those who are not familiar with the operations of the LSA (very large) Annual Meeting, one principal function of the CRNs is to "bundle” papers and panels into coherent thematic programs with chairs and commentators. All who are interested are welcome to join the initial application. Non-U.S. scholars warmly encouraged to join the application.

June 13, 2018 in Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 3, 2018

Article on Change is Constant in Estate Planning: Reflections of an ACTEC Law Journal Editor

0Bridget J. Crawford published an Article entitled, Change is Constant in Estate Planning: Reflections of an ACTEC Law Journal Editor, Wills, Trusts, & Estates Law eJournal (2018). Provided below is an abstract of the Article:

In this essay, the author provides a brief overview of the history of the flagship publication of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, including its past leadership, focus and multiple name changes. The author reflects on her service as editor of the ACTEC Law Journal and the importance of a commitment to publish articles of ever-increasing quality, while simultaneously ensuring that the Journal remains a venue that is inclusive, appealing and useful to all ACTEC Fellows. Although the ACTEC Law Journal explicitly names and norms itself as a law review, as opposed to a newsletter or a venue for publication of CLE materials, it is important that the publication continues to function as resource and target venue for all of the organization's Fellows. Given the reality that busy practitioners and judges simply do not have the same time in their day that academics have to write long law review articles that engage with prior scholarship, solve novel problems, and propose normative solutions and related policy concerns, during the author's editorship, she sought to create multiple opportunities for all Fellows to submit shorter pieces to the ACTEC Law Journal. This included an issue devoted to short commentaries on the estate planning jurisprudence of the Supreme Court of the United States and the inclusion in other issues of brief reviews of articles published in the ACTEC Law Journal.

May 3, 2018 in Estate Planning - Generally, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Yale Law School Center for Private Law Fellow Applications Available

Yale PrivateThe Yale Law School Center for Private Law is now accepting applications for the 2018-19 Fellow in Private Law. The Fellowship in Private Law is a full-time, one-year residential appointment, with the possibility of reappointment. The Fellowship is designed for graduates of law or related Ph.D. programs who are interested in pursuing an academic career and whose research is related to any of the Center for Private Law's research areas, which include contracts (including commercial law, corporate finance, bankruptcy, and dispute resolution), property (including intellectual property), and torts. More information is available here.

February 8, 2018 in Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 2, 2018

Managing Tax Basis in Estate Planning

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2018-02-02/6285f04a-96e1-480a-8331-aeff3c98b673.pngThe Northern Trust Company’s Paul S. Lee gave one of the more memorable presentations at the 2018 Heckerling Conference. His discussion focused primarily on the need for planners to manage tax basis as part of the overall estate planning process. Lee equated the applicable exclusion amount to being “free basis,” as those assets covered by the exclusion receive a step-up in basis while remaining free of the federal estate tax. Because of this, he recommends reserving the use of the applicable exclusion only to those instances where there is some chance of the exclusion being lost. A prime example of such an instance would be immediately prior to the expiration of the current exemption thresholds.

See Jordan Smith, Managing Tax Basis in Estate Planning, Wealth Management.com, January 25, 2018.

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.) for bringing this article to my attention.

February 2, 2018 in Current Events, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax, New Legislation, Scholarship, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

SEALS Trusts and Estates Proposed Programming

The following is posted at the request of Profs. Naomi Cahn and Deborah S. Gordon:

We are hoping to encourage more trusts and estates programming at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools conference, which will be held from August 6-12 in Ft. Lauderdale.  We will be proposing two discussion groups, described below, one which focuses on pedagogy and one on scholarship; please let us know if you would like to participate. In addition, please feel free to propose a panel or discussion group yourself; here is the submission information, http://www.sealslawschools.org/submissions/.

Thank you!  If you have any questions and would like to participate, then please contact Naomi Cahn, ncahn@law.gwu.edu/, and Deborah Gordon, dsg45@drexel.edu

PROPOSED DISCUSSION GROUPS

Both pedagogy and scholarship within trusts and estates are moving beyond traditional core topics.  We are proposing two plenary discussion groups that explore how pedagogy and scholarship are expanding the ways of teaching and studying trusts and estates and related doctrines. One group will address innovations in teaching, including both skills and doctrine, and teaching about topics that overlap with other areas of the  law, such as Elder Law, Family Law, Property, and Professional Responsibility; the second group will explore new scholarship.

October 17, 2017 in Conferences & CLE, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)