Wills, Trusts & Estates Prof Blog

Editor: Gerry W. Beyer
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Thursday, July 29, 2021

Impact of President Biden's Tax Plan on Estate Planning

Estate planningThere has been speculation on what President Biden's tax proposal will look like and what effects it will have on estate planning. There is also a question about the likelihood that President Biden's tax plan will be enacted into law. 

The Biden Administration announced the American Families Plan in April 2021, which proposed "significant tax law changes to increase taxes on both corporations and high-net worth individuals and to provide more resources to enhance IRS tax enforcement efforts. 

In May 2021, the United States Department of Treasury issued a report entitled, "General Explanation of the Administration's Fiscal 2022 Revenue Proposals (generally referred to as the Green Book) which included more details on the tax law changes previously proposed in the American Families Plan." The memo provided an overview of the proposed changes of the American Families Plan and the impact those changes may have on estate planning. 

Under the current proposal, "there will be a realization of capital gains to the extent such gains are in excess of a $1 million exclusion per person, upon the transfer of appreciated assets at death or by a gift. . .the proposal would provide various exclusions and exceptions for certain family-owned and operated businesses. 

One thing that was not addressed in the Green Book are changes to the federal estate, gift and generation skipping transfer (GST) tax system, although Biden did propose these changes during his campaign. 

There is a lot of uncertainty surrounding new tax laws, so high-net-worth individuals with estate tax concerns should consider taking advantage heightened exemptions by implementing wealth transfer strategies like the following: 

  • Intentionally Defective Grantor Trust (IDGT)
  • Spousal Lifetime Access Trust (SLAT)
  • Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT)
  • Charitable Lead Annuity Trust (CLAT)
  • Annual Gifts 
  • And more. 

See Jeffrey M. Glogower, Stephen J. Bahr, & Adam W. Randle, Impact of President Biden's Tax Plan on Estate Planning, The National Law Review, July 26, 2021. 

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

July 29, 2021 in Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 28, 2021

IRS Practice Units

IRS"As part of LB&I's knowledge management efforts, Practice Units are developed through internal collaboration and serve as both job aids and training materials on tax issues. For example, Practice Units provide IRS staff with explanations of general tax concepts as well as information about a specific type of transaction. Practice Units will continue to evolve as the compliance environment changes and new insights and experiences are contributed."

Visit the link below to view the practice units: 

https://www.irs.gov/businesses/corporations/practice-units

Special thanks to Mark J. Bade (CPA, GCMA, St. Louis, Missouri) for bringing this article to my attention. 

 

May 28, 2021 in Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 14, 2021

Article: What Would Settlor Do? Immortal Trust Settlors, Federal Transfer Taxes, and the Protean Irrevocable Trust

Kent D. Schenkel recently published an article entitled, What Would Settlor Do? Immortal Trust Settlors, Federal Transfer Taxes, and the Protean Irrevocable Trust, Wills, Trusts, & Estates Law ejournal (2021). Provided below is the abstract to the Article: Estate planning

The increasingly protean irrevocable trust puts substantive trust law and the federal transfer taxes at cross-purposes. State trust law’s overriding objective is simply to carry out the intent of the trust settlor. Settlors intend to manage or control the benefits from gifts over some period of time—that is, after all, the purpose of the donative trust. In contrast, the federal transfer taxes seek, by major policy purpose, to decrease the incidence of dynastic wealth—wealth locked into single-family possession and passed on from generation to generation. Yet state legislative changes to trust laws—abandoning or extending the terms of rules against perpetuities, for example—pave the way for dynastic wealth by allowing trusts to entrench that wealth in families for generations, or even indefinitely. Evolving trust laws also increasingly permit trust settlors, often by postmortem proxy, to repeatedly modify, refresh or even completely restructure irrevocable trusts in response to post-transfer events.

This essay looks critically at a change to the common law equitable deviation doctrine that ensures that irrevocable trusts can always be optimized in the face of circumstantial uncertainty. This modified equitable deviation doctrine invites trustees and courts to first imagine how the settlor would respond to unanticipated circumstances affecting an irrevocable trust, then further directs modification of the trust terms accordingly. Although this development expands settlor control over irrevocable trusts qualitatively and chronically, thereby increasing both the durability and duration of dynastic wealth, current federal transfer tax provisions are likely insufficient to discourage its proliferation. Trust settlors privileged to take advantage of the post-disposition control offered by trust laws already own a vastly disproportionate share of the nation’s wealth. Perpetual post-transfer control of wealth by a trust settlor or his proxy further entrenches this inequality of ownership and contributes to the problems it causes, including the erosion of democratic institutions. Unmitigated allegiance to the expansive value of freedom of disposition and its corollary, “the intent of the donor,” should be tempered, in post-transfer analyses, with a view to its consequences. Failing that, especially but not exclusively where costs to third parties are implicated, certain post-disposition trust modifications should be deemed new dispositions that bring about transfer tax penalties to the trust corpus.

May 14, 2021 in Articles, Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Trusts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 2, 2021

U.S. Senate Introduces Legislation for Higher Taxes on Wealth

Wealth taxOn March 25, 2021, Senator Bernie Sanders introduced the For the 99.5 Percent Act (the 99.5 percent Act). The Act looks to modify the estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax. 

If accepted, the Act would "reduce the estate tax exemption, set the gift tax exemption at an amount lower than the estate tax exemption, and increase tax rates on large gifts and estates, effectively returning the gift and estate tax rules to the law in effect in 2009, but with higher rates." The changes would apply to transfers occurring after December 31, 2021. 

Other changes under the Act include: 

  • The estate tax exemption amount would be reduced to $3.5 Million per individual ($7 Million for married couples), with no adjustment for changes in the cost of living. Under current law, the estate tax exemption amount is $11.7 Million per individual ($23.4 Million for married couples), adjusted annually for changes in the cost of living. However, the current exemption amount is scheduled to be reduced by 50% after December 31, 2025. 
  • The amount of the exemption available to shelter lifetime transfers from gift tax would be reduced to $1 Million per individual ($2 Million for married couples), with no adjustment for changes in the cost of living. The portion of the $1 Million exemption used during an individual’s lifetime to shelter lifetime gifts from gift tax would reduce the amount of the $3.5 Million exemption available to shelter transfers at the individual’s death from estate tax. Under current law, the gift tax exemption is the same as the estate tax exemption (and will also be reduced by 50% after December 31, 2025), and any amount not used during an individual’s lifetime is available to shelter transfers at death from estate tax. 
  • The estate tax rate would increase using a progressive tax rate based upon the value of the decedent’s estate:
    • There would be no tax on the first $3.5 Million of the estate.
    • There would be a 45% tax on the estate in excess of $3.5 Million up to $10 Million.
    • There would be a 50% tax on the estate in excess of $10 Million up to $50 Million.
    • There would be a 55% tax on the estate in excess of $50 Million up to $1 Billion.
    • There would be a 65% tax on the estate in excess of $1 Billion.

See U.S. Senate Introduces Legislation for Higher Taxes on Wealth, Greenberg Glusker, March 26, 2021. 

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

April 2, 2021 in Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, New Legislation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 1, 2021

The 2020 Election and the Effect on Current Gift, Estate and Generation-Skipping Transfer Taxes

TaxDue to the election results and President Joe Biden taking Trump's position in the Oval Office, conversation continues to grow surrounding the area of taxes and estate planning. 

As many are aware of by now, Biden has brought forth a few proposals that will greatly impact estate planning for Americans. 

Gift tax, estate tax and generation-skipping transfer are among federal taxes that would be affected if Biden's proposals took effect.

"The gift tax (which applies to lifetime transfers) and estate tax (which applies to transfers at death) are “unified,” meaning that a single rate schedule applies to both taxes and there is a single “exemption” amount that each individual may transfer during life or at death without paying gift or estate taxes. The GST tax is an additional tax imposed on certain transfers made to persons more than one generation below the donor. The GST tax applies to transfers during life and to transfers at and after death." 

Under current law, gift, estate, and GST exemptions are currently at $11.7 million. These rates are expected to "sunset" on January 1, 2026. However, if Biden's proposals are adopted and implemented, the rates could return back to $5 million before 2026. 

Although it is not clear what changes will be adopted or made in the tax arena, it is important to stay updated and informed of what is going on. 

Some things to consider: 

  • Retroactivity and risk 
  • Disclaimer
  • Marital deduction
  • Loans and forgiveness 

See Daniel R. Donovan & Beth Abraham, The 2020 Election and the Effect on Current Gift, Estate and Generation-Skipping Transfer Taxes, Faegre Drinker, February 22, 2021.  

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

March 1, 2021 in Current Affairs, Current Events, Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 2, 2020

2020-2021 TREASURY-IRS PRIORITY GUIDANCE PLAN

Estate planningOn November 17, 2020, the Treasury Department and the IRS released their Priority Guidance Plan for the 12 months from July 2020 through June 2021. 

The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC) posted an overview of what the Treasury and the IRS will focus on for the next seven months. 

Part 1 of the plan is titled "Implementation of Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA)" and contains 38 items. Of the 38 items, there are two in particular that will interest estate planners. 

Item 4 of Part 1 will have some focus on the deduction of estate and trust expenses. The item includes Notice 2018-61 which was originally published on July 30, 2018, which stated, "“the Treasury Department and the IRS intend to issue regulations clarifying that estates and non-grantor trusts may continue to deduct expenses described in section 67(e)(1)” despite the eight-year “suspension” of section 67(a) in the 2017 Tax Act by new section 67(g)." 

Item 33 of Part 1 provides "significant reinforcement for the proposition that the death of the grantor does not by itself cause the recognition of gain with respect to appreciated assets held in a grantor trust."

The Priority Guidance Plan also includes information on burden reduction, relief regarding GST exemption allocations and elections, and more general guidance. The ACTEC website also provides information on omissions from the Priority Guidance Plan. 

The aforementioned information and more is available in the source cited below. 

See 2020-2021 TREASURY-IRS PRIORITY GUIDANCE PLAN, The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel, November 30, 2020. 

December 2, 2020 in Current Events, Estate Planning - Generally, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax, New Legislation, Trusts, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Individual Tax Planning Following the November 2020 Elections

TaxThe presidential election has passed and individual tax planning remains a touchy subject as there is a lot of uncertainty surrounding the topic. As of now, it is unclear what the remainder of this year holds, much less what the beginning of 2021 has in store. 

As of now, it appears that the Democrats will control the House of Representatives, it is unclear which party will control the U.S. Senate. Unfortunately, the uncertainty regarding the Senate will remain until the run-off for the two U.S. Senate seats in Georgia occurs in January 5, 2021. 

There has been a lot of talk about potential changes to tax policy under a Joe Biden presidency and if the Democrats end up in control of the House and the Senate, the changes are more than likely to occur. 

With this in mind, individuals are taking advantage of the current tax exemptions just in case they are gone in 2021. 

The potential changes would have an effect on taxes on Income, Capital Gains, and Estate taxes. 

If these changes worry you or you will simply just miss the current tax exemptions you have available to you, now is the time to get your affairs in order and take the necessary steps to utilize the exemptions. 

For strategies and tips to use to take advantage of tax exemptions, see the article cited below. 

See Mark J. Andres, Individual Tax Planning Following the November 2020 Elections, National Law Review, November 25, 2020. 

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

December 1, 2020 in Current Events, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 30, 2020

2021 Inflation Adjustments of Interest to International Tax Practitioners

Estate planningThe IRS recently released its annual Revenue Procedure containing inflation-adjustments for 2021.

 Of interest to international tax and estate planning practitioners are the following:

  • Estate and Gift Tax Basic Exclusion Amount: $11,700,000
  • Gift Tax Annual Exclusion Amount: $15,000
  • Increased Annual Exclusion for Gifts to Non-U.S. Citizen Spouses: $159,000
  • Tax Liability Threshold for Covered Expatriate Status: $172,000
  • Gain Exclusion Amount for Covered Expatriates: $744,000
  • Foreign Earned Income Exclusion Amount: $108,700

 

"Practitioners should note that the estate and gift tax basic exclusion amount is only available to U.S. citizens and U.S. domiciliaries. Foreign individuals do not receive any exclusion amount for U.S. gift tax purposes (other than the annual exclusion amounts) and only receive a $60,000 exemption for U.S. estate tax purposes."

November 30, 2020 in Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax, Income Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Article on Family Fiduciaries in the Protective Jurisdiction

Ben Chen recently published an article entitled, Family Fiduciaries in the Protective Jurisdiction, Wills, Trusts, & Estates Law ejournal (2020). Provided below is the abstract to the Article. 

Baby boomers in Australia are entering retirement with a higher life expectancy and more wealth than any generation before them. Mental and physical decline can make it difficult or impractical for many older people to safeguard their own financial interests. In particular, guardians and attorneys who manage property for the elderly have the opportunity to misuse their power to enrich themselves. Responding to recommendations from law reform commissions, Australian legislatures tend to impose the strictest form of fiduciary regulation on guardians and attorneys.

Bucking the trend, this article argues in favour of a flexible model of fiduciary regulation. This model originates from historical Chancery jurisprudence and continues to enjoy support in New South Wales. The prevailing, strict model not only tends to be overprotective, it also ignores the reality that litigation about the properties of the elderly is often driven by inheritance expectations. The flexible model can alleviate the potential overprotectiveness of fiduciary law and accommodate harmless conflicts in close families.

November 24, 2020 in Articles, Estate Planning - Generally, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Trusts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 22, 2020

Is Now the Right Time to Forgive Intrafamily Loans?

Estate planningIf you made intrafamily loans to family members in the past, or even more recently due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you should consider forgiving those loans. Here's why, as of now, the gift and estate tax exemption rates are at an all-time high. Also, the interest rates are at a record breaking low. 

It is possible that intrafamily loans can be used as an estate planning tool due to the ability to transfer wealth to your loved ones tax free so long as the loan proceeds reach a certain level of returns. 

"Generally, to ensure the desired tax outcome, an intrafamily loan must have an interest rate that equals or exceeds the applicable federal rate (AFR) at the time the loan is made. The principal and interest are included in the lender’s estate, so the key to transferring wealth tax-free is for the borrower to invest the loan proceeds in a business, real estate or another opportunity whose returns outperform the AFR."

Any excess from these investment returns over the interest expense will work as a tax-free gift to the borrower. With low interest rates, it is much easier to outperform the APR. 

If have some leftover exemption, forgiving an intrafamily loan will allow you to transfer the entire loan principal plus any accrued interest tax-free. This will allow you to take advantage of the $11.58 million exemption amount before it is gone. 

There are also income tax considerations. Typically, forgiving intrafamily loans will be considered a gift, which carries with it no income tax consequences. 

In deciding whether or not you should forgive an intrafamily loan, you should speak with your financial and/or estate planning advisor.

See Joseph R. Marion, III & David T. Riedel, Is Now the Right Time to Forgive Intrafamily Loans?, Adler, Pollock, & Sheehan P.C.: Insight on Estate Planning, October 27, 2020.

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

November 22, 2020 in Current Events, Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Generation-Skipping Transfer Tax, Gift Tax | Permalink | Comments (0)