Wills, Trusts & Estates Prof Blog

Editor: Gerry W. Beyer
Texas Tech Univ. School of Law

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

How Covid-19 Will Change Aging and Retirement

Estate planningThe most recent Fall wave of COVID-19 continues to destroy lives and communities throughout the United States. The pandemic has also affected retirement and old age and how Americans deal with and plan for these things. 

Physician and entrepreneur Bill Thomas stated, "isolation of older people has long been a problem, but Covid is focusing attention on the issue and adding urgency" to address it. With rising government deficits and falling bond yields, there is a lot of uncertainty surrounding retirement and how to fund it. Thus, many people are continuing to work for as long as possible. 

However, innovations are on the rise. Laura Carstensen, director of Stanford University's Center on Longevity stated that people will begin to "rethink retirement altogether." In the wake of Covid, there has been more emphasis on mortality, causing us to consider how we want to live in die. 

It is likely that more people will age at home. Covid has cast the spotlight on long-term care facilities, revealing "how shockingly inadequate our care infrastructure and systems are." Innovation will hopefully provide better nursing homes and more resources for people to age at home. 

Also, innovation is aimed at older people due to the pandemic and the aging population. However, Covid-related lockdowns are likely to "reduce the life expectancies of those who avoid or survive the virus." 

New innovations will hopefully cause people to work longer, value life more, save more for retirement, embrace healthier lifestyles, and plan for death. 

See Anne Tergesen, How Covid-19 Will Change Aging and Retirement, Wall Street Journal, November 15, 2020. 

Special thanks to Lewis Saret (Attorney, Washington, D.C.) for bringing this article to my attention.  

November 25, 2020 in Current Events, Death Event Planning, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Elder Law, Estate Planning - Generally | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 30, 2020

Legal Considerations of Living Together in a Multi-Generational Home

HouseDue to COVID-19, many people have had to balance working remotely with caring for their children. That being said, many are using their homes as an office and a school, while also maintaining it as a home. 

The difficulty balancing, remote learning and homework, virtual meetings and work calls, and shopping, cooking and cleaning has created more housework. It is no surprise that wear and tear and stress levels have increased. 

Many are considering moving in with their parents or children are needing to consider the legal implications of doing so. When living with multiple generations, new considerations come into play. These considerations include,  "the burdens and the benefits of raising and teaching the children together, dividing the chores, maintaining the home, and pooling their finances together during this time of uncertainty."

Below are a  few initial questions that you should discuss with your family when considering living in a multigenerational home: 

  • Who is contributing to the purchase price?
  • Is it a gift, advance on inheritance, loan, or will they hold an ownership interest equal to their capital contribution? 
  • How do you equalize your estate to the remainder of your family?
  • What happens if a couple gets divorced?
  • Who has the right to reside in the home and how will the ownership be divided?
  • What happens if a parent must later reside in a nursing home for care?
  • Do they have sufficient assets in their name to pay for nursing care or will Medicaid look to his or her ownership interest in the home for payment?
  • If one of the owners dies, who receives his or her interest in the home?

With all of the uncertainty surrounding us, these questions are very important, and the answers even moreso. 

See Rebecca MacGregor, Legal Considerations of Living Together in a Multi-Generational Home, Bowditch & Dewey, Estate, Financial & Tax Planning Group, October 13, 2020. 

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

October 30, 2020 in Current Events, Death Event Planning, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Elder Law, Estate Administration, Estate Planning - Generally, Estate Tax, Gift Tax, Guardianship, Trusts, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Celebrity Estate Planning: Misfires of the Rich and Famous III

CelebrityWe tend to look at celebrities like they are supernatural, even immortal, which is probably why we are often shocked and confused when one of our favorite celebrities pass on. The truth is, like us, celebrities are normal people and like us, they often neglect estate planning. This is the truth despite the amount of attorneys and other representatives they have on their team. 

Discussed below are a couple of celebrity stories that will hopefully teach you a useful lesson on the importance of estate planning and the risks of avoiding the issue. 

Johnny Hallyday

You may know Hallyday as the "French Elvis." Hallyday died of lung cancer in December of 2017 at the age of 74. At the time of his death, Hallyday was married to his fourth wife when he passed and had adopted children as well as natural born children. 

Hallyday died with estate planning documents that had been executed in California that left his estate to Laeticia, his fourth wife and their two children upon her death. Hallyday's natural born children opposed this estate plan in French court arguing that French law should apply to Hallyday's estate. In 2019, a French court agreed with Hallyday's natural born children, finding that forced heirship applied. 

The lesson from this story is to make sure that your client knows exactly what they want and the emotional and financial battles that can result from certain estate planning decisions. 

In a like Hallyday's where the client may be able to choose their domicile, you will want to make sure you are clear as to which law will govern the estate. 

Stan Lee

Stan Lee is one of the creative minds behind Marvel. Lee died at the age of 95 in November of 2018. Despite his fame and contribution to the world, Lee was also subject to "predators who seek to take advantage of the elderly." Lee's estate was estimated at $80 million when he died. He was only survived by a daughter. 

After Lee's wife passed on, Lee was left without stable care and security. This lead to a battle between Lee's daughter and other people that had snaked their way into Lee's life. Lee realized that he had multiple people trying to manipulate him and steal his money and was forced to send out a "cry for help" in an affidavit. Luckily, one of these aforementioned snakes was arrested following an investigation by the Los Angeles Police. 

Lee had to spend his last months on this Earth protecting himself from elder abuse. If someone would do that to Stan Lee, you can bet your bottom dollar that they would do it to you too.

 

There are many, many more celebrity stories that shed light on the importance of estate planning and the risks associated with failing to do so. For more, 

See Jessica Galligan Goldsmith et al., Celebrity Estate Planning: Misfires of the Rich and Famous III, American Bar Association: Probate and Property, September/October 2020. 

September 29, 2020 in Current Events, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Elder Law, Estate Administration, Trusts, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Remote Notarization Law Now Available in Massachusetts

WilltestamentThe number of states that have recently passed legislation to allow remote notarization for estate planning documents during the ongoing pandemic is quickly growing. Massachusetts is number 45 with Governor Baker signing the bill into law on April 27th.

There are certain guidelines that must be followed.

  • The allowance only lasts until three days after the end of the state of emergency, which has been extended to May 18th.
  • Only attorneys and paralegals under their supervision may notarize estate planning documents: wills, trusts, durable powers of attorney, and HIPAA releases.
  • All remote notarization sessions must be recorded and the recording saved for 10 years.
  • The notary must sign a supplemental affidavit verifying a number of facts, including that the person signing the documents and all the witnesses were in the state of Massachusetts.
  • The notarization is not effective until the notary receives and compiles all original signature pages, notarizes the document, and completes supplemental affidavit.

For the immediate future this is great news, but the question remains: why is this law not permanent? Also, why do all the witnesses need to be in Massachusetts? 

See Laura Goodman & Harry S. Margolis, Remote Notarization Law Now Available in Massachusetts, Margolis.com, April 28, 2020.

Special thanks to Joel C. Dobris (Professor of Law, UC Davis School of Law) for bringing this article to my attention.

April 30, 2020 in Current Affairs, Current Events, Death Event Planning, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Elder Law, Estate Planning - Generally, New Legislation, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 25, 2020

CLE on Primer on Life Insurance and Basic Structuring

CLEThe Section of Real Property, Trust & Estate Law of the American Bar Association is presenting a webinar entitled, Primer on Life Insurance and Basic Structuring, on Tuesday, April 28, 2020 at 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm EST. Provided below is a description of the event.

This fundamentals program will provide an overview of commonly used life insurance products and basic structuring to give planners the tools to advise clients who own or are considering purchasing a life insurance policy.

The topics covered will include:

    • Types of insurance products
    • Suitability
    • Taxation
    • Life insurance trusts in general
    • Considerations for life insurance trust trustees

Speaker include:

    • Bruce Tannahill, Mass Mutual, Phoenix, AZ
    • Melisa Seyhun, Merrill Lynch, Chicago, IL

April 25, 2020 in Current Affairs, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Estate Planning - Generally, Income Tax, Trusts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 20, 2020

Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House

HouseGifting a house outright to an adult child or adding them to the property's deed may avoid the hassle of probate, but doing so may bring along its own slew of issues. These problems range from a potentially large tax bill to the house being in danger if the child files for bankruptcy.

Sometimes parents transfer a home to their child to try to qualify for Medicaid, the government program that pays health care and nursing home bills for the indigent. But gifts or transfers made within five years of applying for Medicaid can lead to a penalty period when seniors are disqualified from receiving benefits.

If an adult child is gifted a house through inheritance or a will, they will also get a "step-up in tax basis." Meaning the value of the house upon the conveyance will not be based on the date they acquired it, but rather when the previous owner acquired it. Kenneth Robinson of Rocky River, Ohio had a client that received his mother's house as a gift - against his advice - prior to the mother's death. The mother purchased the house in 1976 for $16,000, but the son acquired the property with a market value of $200,000 with a tax bill of $32,000 because of the $184,000 gain.

However, Section 2036 of the Internal Revenue Code says that if the mother retained a “life interest” in the property, which includes the right to continue living there, the home would remain in her estate rather than be considered a completed gift. There are specific rules for what constitutes a life interest, including the power to determine what happens to the house and liability for its bills. The executor of the person would then file gift tax return on the deceased's behalf to show that the recipient was given a remainder interest, or the right to inherit at the person's death.

See Liz Weston, Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House, Nerd Wallet, April 3, 2020.

April 20, 2020 in Current Affairs, Disability Planning - Property Management, Estate Planning - Generally, Gift Tax, Income Tax, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, April 19, 2020

CLE on Electronic Wills: Recent Developments, State Legislation, the New Uniform Electronic Wills Act, and More

CLEThe American Law Institute is holding a webcast entitled, Electronic Wills: Recent Developments, State Legislation, the New Uniform Electronic Wills Act, and More, on Monday, April 20, 2020 at 1:00 - 2:00 pm Eastern. Provided below is a summary of the event.

Why You Should Attend

The “electronic wills” movement has become a hot topic in recent years and continues to stir debate while gaining cautious acceptance. Further, the Uniform Electronic Wills Act was recently approved by Uniform Law Commission and is now ready for consideration by the states. What is meant the term electronic will? What are the reasons behind this movement and what are the controversial elements associated with electronic wills?

What You Will Learn

Electronic wills are gaining wider acceptance as more states permit wills and other estate planning documents to be signed entirely electronically. Join us for a 60-minute webcast to find out the latest developments involving electronic wills, and the opportunities and risks associated with signing estate planning documents electronically.

Our faculty have been closely involved in the electronic wills movement for years and will discuss:

- Fundamental Elements of Will Statutes

- Factual Scenarios from Actual Electronic Will Cases

- Types of Electronic Wills

- Legal, Technological, and Market Factors Influencing the Electronic Wills Movement

- Legislative Activity in the United States

- The Uniform Electronic Wills Act

- How States are Responding to Proposed Legislation

- Perspectives on the Impact of Electronic Wills Movement on Professional Practices


All registrants will receive a set of downloadable course materials to accompany the program.

Who Should Attend
Estate planning and financial planning professionals will benefit from our experienced panelists’ insights as to where the law may be headed and how the electronic wills movement might impact their professional practice.

April 19, 2020 in Conferences & CLE, Current Affairs, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Estate Planning - Generally, Technology, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 17, 2020

If Not Now, When? New Legislation Simplifies Estate Planning in the Time of Coronavirus

ElecNew Jersey has now joined many other states that have enacted laws to allow for digital or remote notarization of estate planning documents during the COVID-19 pandemic. Governor Murphy has signed legislation that was sought by the legal bar to allow real estate closing, estate planning, and other legal transactions to move forward while maintaining social distancing through electronic communications.

A will does not require a notary but does require two witnesses in New Jersey, but to make it a self-proving a notary is required, which means that the will can be admitted to probate without the witnesses needing to be tracked down to attest to the signing. Health care directives require either a notary or two witnesses, although it is standard procedure to have both. Powers of attorney must be notarized. Now neither the witnesses nor the notary have to remain six feet away, but rather can witness remotely through Facetime, Zoom, or any other video application.

See Shana Siegel, If Not Now, When? New Legislation Simplifies Estate Planning in the Time of Coronavirus, National Law Review, April 15, 2020.

Special thanks to Jim Hillhouse (Professional Legal Marketing (PLM, Inc.)) for bringing this article to my attention.

April 17, 2020 in Current Affairs, Current Events, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Estate Planning - Generally, New Legislation, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 26, 2020

Americans are Rushing to Make Online Wills with 143% Uptake During Coronavirus Outbreak - But Lawyers Warn Some Might be Invalid

WillAs of Wednesday, March 26, 2020, there have been 823 deaths linked to the novel coronavirus in the United States and over 60,000 confirmed cases. Spreading faster than the virus itself may be people's realization of their mortality, as many Americans are rushing to their computers to make digital wills.

Online will company Gentreo told CNBC they have seen a 143% week on week increase in business; Trust & Will has seen a 50% rise. Around 40% of Americans are thought to currently have wills place. Attorney Alain Roman, who assists with estate planning, said "Seeing in the news that so many people are passing away worldwide and here in the U.S., people are getting a little scared. It’s getting them thinking about having a plan in place in case something happens to them."

But legal experts have a warning for those signing wills online: be wary of their legality. Leslie Tayne, founder of Tayne Law Group, said the digital document will only be valid if it "meets all of the legal requirements of your state." Tayne added that "since the vast majority of DIY wills are created and executed without any oversight from an attorney, a larger number of wills (may not be) executed in compliance with the proper will formalities, and that could end up making the will invalid."

See Lauren Fruen, Americans are Rushing to Make Online Wills with 143% Uptake During Coronavirus Outbreak - But Lawyers Warn Some Might be Invalid, Daily Mail, March 25, 2020.

Special thanks to Joel C. Dobris (Professor of Law, UC Davis School of Law) for bringing this article to my attention.

March 26, 2020 in Current Affairs, Current Events, Disability Planning - Property Management, Estate Planning - Generally, Technology, Wills | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

CLE on Medicaid: Qualifying Clients for Immediate Care and Protecting Assets

CLEThe National Business Institute is holding a webcast entitled, Medicaid: Qualifying Clients for Immediate Care and Protecting Assets, on Friday, April 17, 2020 at Central: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Provided below is the description of the event.

Program Description

Helping Clients Secure Nursing Home Coverage Without Destroying Family Assets

Medicaid planning is most effective when done ahead of time. Sadly, most clients seek help when the need for nursing home is urgent or when the loved one is already in the facility. Do you have all the tools at your disposal for tackling such tough cases? This practical guide zeroes in on the very techniques that work in the crisis situations - when the penalty period is already triggered or care is already being provided. Learn what asset transfer approaches are still available and how to make certain to protect family assets. Help clients make the best of a tough situation. Register today!

    • Clarify what types of asset transfers will NOT trigger penalty periods of ineligibility.
    • Get all the tools you need to provide for the spouse staying in the community.
    • Draft caregiver agreements that are sure to qualify for Medicaid compensation.
    • Learn what can still be done with an adverse Medicaid decision.
    • Protect the family home with techniques tailored to specific family dynamics and circumstances.

Who Should Attend

This Medicaid planning guide is designed for attorneys. It will also benefit nursing home administrators, accountants, geriatric care managers, care coordinators, social workers and paralegals.

Course Content

    • What Happens in an Emergency Medical Situation
    • Asset Purchase and Transfer Strategies
    • How to Transfer a Residence
    • Using Promissory Notes to Help Clients Currently in the Nursing Home
    • Life Care Contracts Between Parents and Children
    • Contesting Denial of Benefits, Penalty Period Dates and Other Adverse Medicaid Decisions
    • Providing for the Community Spouse
    • Legal Ethics in Medicaid Practice
    • Emergency Medicaid for Non-Qualified Non-Citizens and Undocumented Individuals

March 25, 2020 in Conferences & CLE, Disability Planning - Health Care, Disability Planning - Property Management, Elder Law, Estate Planning - Generally, Professional Responsibility | Permalink | Comments (0)