TortsProf Blog

Editor: Christopher J. Robinette
Widener Commonwealth Law School

Monday, January 21, 2019

18th Annual Conference on European Tort Law

The European Centre of Tort and Insurance Law and the Institute for European Tort Law of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Graz will host the 18th Annual Conference on European Tort Law from April 25th through April 27th in Vienna, Austria. 

The Annual Conference provides a unique opportunity for both practitioners and academics to discover the most significant tort law developments from across Europe. A Special Session on Saturday morning is dedicated to the increasingly relevant topic of ‘Human Rights Violations in Global Supply Chains’. 

January 21, 2019 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Simons on the Tort/Crime Distinction

Prosser Award winner Ken Simons has posted to SSRN The Crime/Tort Distinction:  Legal Doctrine and Normative Perspectives.  The abstract provides:

This essay provides an overview of the crime/tort distinction. It first investigates some of the fundamental differences between criminal law and tort law in doctrine and legal structure. It then explores some important similarities and differences in normative perspectives between the two doctrinal fields. This typology should prove analytically useful for examining some of the specific issues at the borderline of crime and torts — such as the proper scope of punitive damage liability and the question whether criminal law as well as tort law should vary legal sanctions simply because of the fortuitous occurrence of harm.

This is a piece he wrote for a symposium here at Widener.

January 16, 2019 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 4, 2019

Torts Section Presents William Prosser Award to Ken Simons

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From Chair Stacey Tovino's Twitter page.  Congratulations, Ken!

January 4, 2019 in Conferences, TortsProfs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 31, 2018

More Torts at the AALS Annual Meeting

In addition to the traditional Torts Section's panel, there is a Jurisprudence panel entitled "Recognizing Wrongs:  Philosophy of Tort Law":

Start Date: 01/05/2019, 10:30 am
End Date: 01/05/2019, 12:00 pm
Room: Grand Salon Section 15
Floor: First Floor
Hotel: Hilton New Orleans Riverside
 
Speakers
 
Speaker: Maria Glover, Georgetown University Law Center 
Speaker: John C. Goldberg, Harvard Law School 
Speaker: Gregory C. Keating, University of Southern California Gould School of Law 
Moderator: Joshua Kleinfeld, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law 
Speaker: Alexandra D. Lahav, University of Connecticut School of Law 
 
 
Though not explicitly about torts, Ben Zipursky is speaking on a panel entitled "Philosophy Within the Departments of Law":
Start Date: 01/05/2019, 9:00 am
End Date: 01/05/2019, 10:25 am
Room: Grand Salon Section 15
Floor: First Floor
Hotel: Hilton New Orleans Riverside
 
Speakers
Moderator: Emad H. Atiq, Cornell Law School 
Speaker: Joshua Kleinfeld, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law 
Speaker: Daniel S. Markovits, Yale Law School 
Speaker: Jeremy James Waldron, New York University School of Law 
Speaker: Benjamin C. Zipursky, Fordham University School of Law 

December 31, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, December 30, 2018

Torts at the AALS Annual Meeting

Stacey Tovino is concluding her term as Chair of the Torts and Compensation Systems Section.  The program is as follows:

Start Date: 01/04/2019, 1:30 pm
End Date: 01/04/2019, 3:15 pm
Room: Grand Salon Section 16
Floor: First Floor
Hotel: Hilton New Orleans Riverside
Speakers
 
Speaker: Mark A. Rothstein, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law 
Speaker: Nadia N. Sawicki, Loyola University Chicago School of Law 
Moderator: Stacey A. Tovino, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law 
Speaker: Elizabeth Weeks, University of Georgia School of Law 
Speaker: John Valery White, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law 
 

This panel will explore the bi-directional relationship between the fields of tort law and health law. The influence of tort law on some basic aspects of health law is well known. For example, tort law provides causes of action, privileges, and defenses on which plaintiffs and defendants rely in traditional medical malpractice cases. This panel will focus on some of the less obvious ties and relationships between the fields, including the potential of tort law to perpetuate healthism (i.e., differential treatment based on health status) through various doctrines, including the active versus passive distinction, contributory negligence, assumption of the risk, and damages rules; the duty to warn of health care providers; the availability of governmental immunity for public hospitals; and the availability of assumption of the risk in cases in which patients select care that falls outside the standard of care.

Business meeting at program conclusion.

December 30, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 11, 2018

2018 Torts Section Newsletter

Scott Hershovitz has released the 2018 AALS Torts Section newsletter:   Download AALS Tort Section Newsletter November 2018

November 11, 2018 in Conferences, Scholarship, TortsProfs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

CFP: Oxford Studies in Private Law Theory

Oxford University Press is pleased to announce the launch of Oxford Studies in Private Law Theory, edited by Paul Miller (Notre Dame) and John Oberdiek (Rutgers), and to issue a call for papers for the first volume. 

Oxford Studies in Private Law Theory is a series of biennial volumes showcasing the best article-length work across private law theory.  The series will publish exceptional work exploring the full range of private law’s domains and doctrines—including contract, property, tort, and fiduciary law as well as equity, unjust enrichment, and remedies—and employing diverse methodological approaches to individual areas of private law as well as to private law in general.  Submissions should be approximately 12,000 words, inclusive of footnotes.  The deadline for submission is May 6th, 2019.

All accepted papers will be presented at a workshop at Notre Dame’s Global Gateway campus in London in late summer/early fall 2019.  The Notre Dame Program in Private Law will cover the expense of contributors’ travel and accommodation.  

To submit a paper for consideration, please email John Oberdiek at oberdiek AT law.rutgers.edu.

October 24, 2018 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 22, 2018

CFP: AI at Duquesne

Jan Levine and Wes Oliver are planning a conference at Duquesne on April 26 & 27 entitled "Artificial Intelligence:  Thinking About Law, Law Practice, and Legal Education."  The CFP is here:   Download Artificial Intelligence Conference%2c Call for Proposals%2c 10-3.18

October 22, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

"Civil Litigation Reform in the Trump Era: Threats and Opportunities" at Fordham Law School

In February, Fordham Law School held a symposium titled “Civil Litigation Reform in the Trump Era:  Threats and Opportunities.”  The articles are now available:

·         “Searching for Salvageable Ideas in FICALA” [Fairness in Class Action Litigation Act of 2017] by Fordham Prof. Howard Erichson

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/02_Erichson-19-35.pdf

 

·         “Jurisdiction in the Trump Era” by UC Hastings Prof. Scott Dodson.

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/05_Dodson-73-86.pdf

 

·         “Rights and Retrenchment in the Trump Era” by U. Penn. Prof. Stephen Burbank and UC Berkeley Prof. Sean Farhang

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/03_Burbank-Farhang-37-64.pdf

 

·         The Looming Battle for Control of Multidistrict Litigation in Historical Perspective” by UC Berkeley Prof. Andrew Bradt

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/06_Bradt-87-106.pdf

 

·         What We Don’t Know About Class Actions but Hope to Know Soon” by U. Penn. Prof. Jonah Gelbach and Stanford Prof. Deborah Hensler

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/04_Gelbach-Hensler-65-71.pdf

 

·         “Asbestos Trust Transparency” by Mark Behrens

http://fordhamlawreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/07_Behrens-107-124.pdf

October 2, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Chamallas Asks "Will Tort Law Have its #MeToo Moment?"

Martha Chamallas has posted to SSRN Will Tort Law Have its #MeToo Moment?Presented at AALS in January and forthcoming in the Journal of Tort Law, the abstract provides:

Using tort law’s treatment of claims for domestic violence and sexual assault as examples, this essay identifies prominent features of a feminist historical approach to law to demonstrate how gender inequality is reproduced over time, despite changes in legal doctrine. When informed by feminist theory, history can function as a critique of past and present regimes of inequality, highlighting the various techniques of exclusion and marginalization that emerge to prevent law from redressing serious, recurring injuries suffered disproportionately by women. The essay explores two such techniques: sexual exceptionalism that treats gender-related torts differently than other harms and the adoption of ostensibly neutral rules that have a disparate impact on women and marginalized groups. The essay speculates as to whether the #MeToo movement can provide the momentum to produce a break from the past, particularly with respect to third-party claims holding employers and other institutional defendants responsible for sexualized harms.

September 12, 2018 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

ALI: Update on Torts-Related Projects

The ALI's 95th Annual Meeting concludes today, but the torts and torts-related projects are finished.  Two of the projects are truly complete.  The membership approved a Proposed Final Draft of the Economic Harm project (Ward Farnsworth, Reporter) and the Law of Liability Insurance project (Tom Baker and Kyle Logue, Reporters).  Several additional sections of the Intentional Torts project (Ken Simons and Jonathan Cardi, Reporters) were also approved.

May 23, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 9, 2018

Zipursky on Online Defamation

Ben Zipursky has posted to SSRN his Monsanto Lecture Online Defamation, Legal Concepts, and the Good Samaritan.  The abstract provides:

Federal and state courts around the country – aided by academics on almost all sides – have completely misread the Communications Decency Act [“CDA”] § 230(c). This widely cited provision was designed to protect Internet service providers and certain Internet users from liability for the defamatory statements posted by others online. Congress did not want these actors to face a defamation-law equivalent of a duty to rescue strangers -- an affirmative duty to remove third parties’ defamatory statements about others. And it certainly did not want a service provider’s efforts to protect a stranger’s reputation to backfire by suddenly creating liability for everything the service provider failed to remove. So, like every state legislature has done for off-duty medical personnel who act as good Samaritans, Congress in 1996 created a law saying that good faith efforts to filter offensive or defamatory material do not create an affirmative duty to remove such material and do not open them up to liability. For good measure, the statute also laid down a basic rule that there is no liability simply for being the conduit of what others have posted or for failing to remove such postings from one’s own site, and it preempts any state law that does otherwise. The CDA thus ensures that states’ defamation law runs roughly parallel to duty-to-rescue doctrine in the common law of negligence as amended by good Samaritan statutes. Indeed, that is why “Good Samaritan” is in the title of CDA § 230(c).

Under the sway of a talented First Amendment bar and in an academic culture hostile to common law concepts, judges around the country have selected an entirely different and misguided interpretation of § 230(c). They read the statute as, in effect, an abrogation of libel law’s classic republication rule, which states that a person who republishes a defamatory statement is liable as if she were the one who first said it. According to the overwhelmingly dominant interpretation of courts today, once someone says something defamatory, anyone who reposts it enjoys complete immunity from all state and federal law, even if the republisher knows the statement to be false and defamatory. Those academics who have rejected this interpretation tend to swing to the other extreme, advocating that website owners who have notice of a defamatory posting should be liable for failure to remove it. This too misses the point of the statute’s text. Through a detailed examination of libel doctrine and a close analysis of the case (Stratton Oakmont v. Prodigy) that generated the development of a protective federal statute, the article displays the correct reading of the statute and the importance of retaining a robust version of the republication rule online.

April 9, 2018 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 9, 2018

4th Annual Civil Procedure Workshop Call for Papers Due March 23

As a reminder, the 4th Annual Civil Procedure Workshop due date is quickly approaching.  The flyer is here:  Download Civil Procedure Workshop Call For Papers.2018

March 9, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 9, 2018

Fordham Symposium: Civil Litigation Reform in the Trump Era

The Fordham Law Review is hosting a symposium on Friday, February 23.  Speakers are:  Mark Behrens, John Beisner, Andrew Bradt, Stephen Burbank, Scott Dodson, Howard Erichson, Sean Farhang, Jonah Gelbach, Maria Glover, Deborah Hensler, Alexandra Lahav, and Judge Lee Rosenthal.  From the announcement:

In the first year of the Trump presidency, several litigation reform bills passed the House of Representatives. The fate of these bills remains uncertain, but the set of issues they raise will not disappear anytime soon. Legal reform advocates see an opportune moment to pursue an aggressive reform agenda, while critics view the bills as threats to civil justice. In addition, the Trump administration has been at the center of a swirl of litigation, raising issues about the role and processes of civil justice. This one-day symposium will address the prospects of civil litigation reform in the Trump era, taking seriously both the threat to the justice system and the opportunities for improving the litigation process.

February 9, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 29, 2018

4th Annual Civil Procedure Workshop: Call for Papers

The 4th annual Civil Procedure Workshop will be held at Stanford on November 9-10, 2018.  Confirmed speakers include Judge Diane Wood, Janet Alexander, Elizabeth Burch, Margaret Lemos, David Engstrom, Myriam Gilles, and Deborah Hensler.  More information, and a call for papers, is available here:  Download Civil Procedure Workshop Call For Papers.2018

January 29, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 27, 2018

2018 AALS Annual Meeting Torts Section Podcast

In case you could not join is in San Diego earlier this month, the podcast from the Torts Section's meeting is here:  

https://soundcloud.com/aals-2/torts-and-compensation-systems/s-qQHGP?in=aals-2/sets/2018-annual-meeting/s-kIL0u

(You will need to log in with your AALS username and password.)

January 27, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 4, 2018

AALS Annual Meeting: Torts Section

I hope to see many of you tomorrow at the Torts and Compensation Systems Section's program at the Annual Meeting.  The program is Friday, January 5 from 1:30-3:15.  We will do three things:

1.  Present the William L. Prosser Award:  Mike Rustad will introduce the 2018 winner, Marshall Shapo.

2.  Panel presentations on "The Role of History in Tort Theory":  Speakers are Martha Chamallas, Don Gifford, John Goldberg, and Ted White.  Unfortunately, John Witt is not able to speak.  The panel will take questions from the audience.

3.  Elect the 2018-19 Executive Committee:  The slate is Chair:  Stacey Tovino; Chair-Elect:  Adam Scales; Secretary:  Scott Hershovitz; Treasurer:  Mary Davis; Members:  Tim Lytton and Nora Freeman Engstrom.

January 4, 2018 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Sugarman on Torts and Guns

Steve Sugarman has posted to SSRN Torts and Guns.  This piece is an expansion of his remarks at last year's AALS Torts Section panel and will appear in volume 10:1 of the Journal of Tort Law.  The abstract provides:

When Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders squabbled during their 2015-16 election campaigns over the federal Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCCA), they were talking past each other, misleading their listeners, and failing to understand what this statute pre-empting some state tort claims against the gun industry was actually about. Many critics of PLCCA argue that gun makers and sellers should be liable just like those in the auto, pharmaceutical drug, and tobacco industries. Yet, it is very rare for defendants in those industries to be successfully sued in tort for the sort of conduct that gun control advocates would like to hold the gun industry liable. In contrast to the hopes and fears of Clinton and Sanders, repealing PLCCA would not likely result in a burst of successful lawsuits, although some might be winners. Perhaps potential and actual tort litigation against this industry is better understood as part of a longer term battle over public opinion and eventual legislative reform.

September 21, 2017 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

AALS Torts Panel: The Role of History in Tort Theory

AALS Torts & Compensation Systems Section

January 5, 2018; 1:30 pm - 3:15 pm (Register here)

The Role of History in Tort Theory

Claims about the nature of tort law are often coupled with historical claims.  Thus, many mid-twentieth century proponents of an expansive, compensation-oriented tort law argued strict liability was prevalent under the common law writ system.  What is the purpose of such appeals to history?  Are they necessary to tort theory, or merely tangential?  Does the importance of history depend on whether the theory is descriptive or normative?  A panel of experts takes up these issues and wrestles with the role of history in theorizing about tort law.

Speaker: Martha E. Chamallas, The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law

Speaker: John C.P. Goldberg, Harvard Law School

Moderator: Christopher J. Robinette, Widener University Commonwealth Law School

Speaker: G. Edward White, University of Virginia School of Law  

Speaker: John F. Witt, Yale Law School

The 2018 Prosser Award will be presented to Marshall S. Shapo, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law .

September 12, 2017 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Sharkey on Data Breach Claims and the Economic Loss Rule

Cathy Sharkey has posted to SSRN Can Data Breach Claims Survive the Economic Loss Rule?.  The abstract provides:

Data security breach cases are fertile ground to explore the impact of the economic loss rule and to challenge the conceptual underpinnings of this judge-made doctrine. The extent to which the economic loss rule serves as a formidable barrier to credit card data security breach cases depends upon the underlying state law; in particular, whether a state adopts the majority or minority position on the rule, as well as how it defines various exceptions thereto. Upon closer examination, it becomes clear that the rule operates in a fundamentally distinct manner in the “stranger paradigm” as compared to the “contracting parties paradigm.” What makes the credit card data security breach cases so vexing is that they often straddle the stranger/contracting parties paradigms. The credit card data breach cases can be reframed in a coherent way that defers to contractual allocation of risk and responsibility but nonetheless allows tort liability to be deployed when needed to ensure the internalization of third-party costs. Seen from a broader regulatory perspective — especially taking into account state statutory provisions relating to enforcement of private industry standards in the credit card arena — the economic loss rule functions as a boundary-policing doctrine between tort and regulation as alternative mechanisms to regulate private parties. Moreover, as a more robust third-party liability insurance market emerges in response to a greater threat of tort liability, insurers will engage in further risk management, exerting more potent regulatory control.

August 16, 2017 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)