Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Solicitation for MAPOC Faculty Awards for 2017

In anticipation of this year’s Mid-Atlantic People of Color Legal Scholarship Conference (MAPOC) this January 27 and 28 at George Washington University Law School, Washington, DC, the MAPOC Awards Committee is soliciting nominations for the Franklin D. Cleckley Award for outstanding faculty contributions and the Banks-Haddon Junior Faculty Award.

Details about the awards, qualifications, and the nomination process are below. In brief, please include the following in the nomination:

  • A nomination statement that identifies the nominee, the award for which they have been nominated (Cleckley Award or Banks/Haddon Award), the nominee’s academic institution, and the nominee’s title at that institution;
  • A narrative describing how the candidate meets the criteria for the award (explained below) for which they have been nominated; and
  • An up-to-date curriculum vitae (C.V.) for the nominee.
  • Additional letters of support (up to three) are welcome but not required.

All nominations must be by email. Please state “Cleckley Award Nomination” or “Banks-Haddon Award Nomination” in the subject line. Please send all nomination emails to atiba.ellis@mail.wvu.edu.

The deadline for nominations is January 10, 2017.

Background

Founded in 1994 and holding its first meeting in 1995 at Howard University, MAPOC created the Franklin D. Cleckley Award, named after Franklin D. Cleckley, born in 1940, who was the first black to serve on West Virginia’s Supreme Court of Appeals.  He is also the Arthur B. Hodges Professor of Law Emeritus of the West Virginia University College of Law.  He earned his J.D. from Indiana University and his LL.M. from Harvard, and during the Vietnam War, he served in the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General Corps.  An expert in West Virginia Evidence and Civil Procedure, Cleckley in 1987 was also awarded the W. Robert Ming Advocate Award from the NAACP for championing civil rights.  In 1990, he formed the Franklin D. Cleckley Foundation, a nonprofit organization, which devoted itself to assisting former convicts with educational and employment opportunities.

The Cleckley Award recognizes outstanding works of scholarship, teaching, and/or service by faculty, administrators, lecturers, and staff at law schools and universities within the Mid-Atlantic Region.   By Mid-Atlantic Region, MAPOC means the following states: Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, southern New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia.

During 1994-1995, MAPOC also created a junior faculty award, which was named in 2015 after Professor Taunya Banks and Chancellor Phoebe Haddon.  Like the Cleckley Award, the Banks-Haddon Award recognizes outstanding scholarship, teaching, and/or service by faculty and administrators who have been teaching six years or less, including tenure-track (but not-yet-tenured) faculty, and administrators, instructors, or staff who are contract employees or have not yet earned security of position at law schools and universities within the Mid-Atlantic Region. 

A graduate of Syracuse University and Howard University School of Law, Professor Taunya Banks is currently the Jacob A. France Professor of Equality Jurisprudence at the University of Maryland School of Law, where she teaches Constitutional Law, Torts, and Law in Popular Culture.  Before entering legal academe, she litigated civil rights cases involving voting rights and housing discrimination, and later while at the EEOC in Los Angeles, California, she litigated early sexual harassment cases. Since entering the legal academy, Professor Banks has become an important scholarly voice for race, gender, and law in contemporary culture, including serving as a contributing co-editor of Screening Justice – the Cinema of Law.  She has also an outstanding service record, which includes mentoring entering and pretenure law professors, and serving on the editorial board of Journal of Legal Education and on the advisory committee of the Law & Society Review.  Professor Banks was a member of the Association of the American Law School’s (“AALS’s”) Executive Committee, and had been a two-term Trustee of the Law School Admissions Council (“LSAC”).

Professor Phoebe Haddon, Chancellor, Rutgers University-Camden, is a nationally respected Constitutional Law and Torts scholar and leader in higher education. Professor Haddon earned her education at Smith College, Duquesne Law School, where she served as the editor in chief of its law review, and Yale University, where he earned her LL.M. After her legal education, she clerked for Judge Joseph A. Weiss, Jr., Third Circuit Court of Appeals, and practiced with Wilmer Cutler & Pickering in Washington, DC.  Prior to her appointment as Chancellor, she had been the dean at University of Maryland’s Francis King Carey School of Law, during which the law school received a $30 million endowment from the W. P. Carey Foundation, and before her decanal tenure, had served with distinction as faculty at the Temple University School of Law for 25 years. 

Chancellor Haddon has received numerous recognitions, including being named by the National Jurist as one of the “25 Most Influential People in Legal Education,” and like Banks, Haddon has an exceptional service record, which includes serving on numerous boards, on the board of governors as co-president of the Society of American Law Teachers (“SALT”), on the executive committee of the of the AALS, and as a trustee of the LSAC.  In 2014, Chancellor Haddon was an invited speaker at the American Law Institute’s Annual Meeting, which included as speakers U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Associate Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Selection Process and Criteria

These MAPOC awards will be conferred on any Mid-Atlantic Regional faculty or administrator, regardless of race, color, sex, ethnicity, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability, who through their scholarship, teaching, and/or service addresses issues that contribute to the knowledge, enrichment, development, and empowerment of ordinary people, whether locally, nationally, or internationally.

The awards will be announced at the annual MAPOC Legal Scholarship Conference in late January of each year.

Recipients of these awards will have consistently demonstrated the following qualities:

  • Scholarship – the recipient shall have demonstrated, through his or her scholarly works or public intellectual writings within the legal academy, a sustained commitment to the advancement of the legal, social, existential, and economic positions of ordinary people in our society – whether locally, nationally, or internationally;
  • Teaching – the recipient shall have demonstrated, through his or her teaching, whether traditional or innovative, a sustained commitment to educating students on public or private issues that advance and protect the legal, social, existential, and economic positions of ordinary people in our society – whether locally, nationally, or internationally; and/or
  • Service – the recipient shall have demonstrated, through his or her participation in the civic life of the communities outside the legal academy, a sustained role of leadership that advances and protects the legal, social, existential, and economic positions of ordinary people in our society – whether locally, nationally, or internationally.

Last, and perhaps most important, the Cleckley Award and the Banks-Haddon Award will be given to senior and junior colleagues, whether faculty, administrators, lecturers, or staff, respectively, who best demonstrate, above all else, a sustained and abiding commitment through their scholarship, teaching, and service, a willing ability to identify, highlight, discuss, expose, eradicate or attempt to eradicate all forms of power-based norms, rules, laws, policies, practices, mechanisms, principles, and beliefs that directly or indirectly disempower or marginalize ordinary people, regardless of age and status, socially, politically, psychologically, institutionally, organizationally, economically, religiously, spiritually, and existentially.

To nominate a candidate for the 2017 Franklin D. Cleckley Award or for the 2017 Banks-Haddon Junior Faculty Award, please submit the following:

 A nomination statement that identifies the nominee, the award for which they have been nominated (Cleckley Award or Banks/Haddon Award), the nominee’s academic institution, and the nominee’s title at that institution;

  • A narrative describing how the candidate meets the above-listed criteria for the award for which they have been nominated; and
  • An up-to-date curriculum vitae (C.V.) for the nominee.
  • Additional letters of support (up to three) are welcome but not required.

Please deliver these materials by electronic mail to Professor Atiba Ellis, West Virginia University College of Law, at atiba.ellis@mail.wvu.edu no later than January 10, 2017.

Materials will be accepted by electronic mail only. In the subject line of the email, as appropriate, please write “Cleckley Award Nomination” or “Banks-Haddon Award Nomination.” Please contact Professor Ellis if you have any questions.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/racelawprof/2016/11/solicitation-for-mapoc-faculty-awards-for-2017.html

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