Friday, May 17, 2019

Chen & Liu: Regulating Provisions of Charitable Activities by Religious Organizations

Chen-jianlin Liu_LovedayJianlin Chen (University of Melbourne) and Junyu Loveday Liu (London School of Economics & Political Science; K&L Gates) have published Managing Religious Competition in China: Regulating Provisions of Charitable Activities by Religious Organizations, in Regulating Religion in Asia: Norms, Modes and Challenges (Cambridge University Press 2019). Here is the abstract:

Drawing on the Law & Religious Market theory, this Chapter utilizes the case study ofChina to explain 1) how regulation of ostensibly non-economically motivated activities(i.e., religion and charity) can be properly conceived as a form of market regulation; and, 2) how such a conception can add a valuable dimension to the discourse. In particular, this Chapter situates China’s regulation of charitable activities by religious organizationsin the context of recent major legal reform on charity law and highlights the contradictory treatment where, on one hand, the law recognizes the self-interested motivation of participants and donors of charitable activities and accommodates their co-opting of charitable activities to promote or advance commercial interests but, on the other hand, specifically prohibits religious organizations from any religiouspropagation during provisions of charitable services. This Chapter argues that from the perspective of market regulation, such denial of religious “self-interest” hampers the purported policy objectives of promoting greater religious participation in charitableactivities but may be justified on the grounds that it promotes religious competition that is normatively desirable.

Lloyd Mayer

May 17, 2019 in International, Publications – Articles, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Canada Revokes Organization's Charity Status for Violating Public Policy Against Providing Support for Israeli Defense Force and Permanence of Occupied Territories and Settlements

Israel-palestinian-oped-0131-1520797951

Section 149 of the Canadian Income Tax Act provides for tax exemption for charitable organizations.  To be exempt, a Canadian organization may not operate contrary to Canadian Public Policy.   Canada's Policy  on Occupied Territories and Settlements holds that Israeli control over territories occupied in 1967 -- the Golan Heights, the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip -- violates the Fourth Geneva Convention and UN Security Council Resolutions 446 and 465

On January 12, the Canadian Revenue Agency notified the Beth Oloth Charitable Organization of the revocation of its exempt status based on a finding that the organization supports the armed forces of a foreign country -- the Israeli Defense Force -- and uses its funds to support Israel's continued occupation of the Golan Heights, the West Bank, East Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip, in violation of Canadian Public Policy.  As reported in the Canadian Jewish News:

It is our position that these pre-army mechinot [a pre-military induction youth training academy] exist to provide support to the Israel Defence Forces, and that funds forwarded to these mechinot are therefore in support of foreign armed forces,” the CRA said. “While increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of Canada’s armed forces is charitable, supporting the armed forces of another country is not.”  Beth Oloth had explained that it was simply funding teachers to provide religious training. It pointed out that since Israel has mandatory army service, “providing any aid to anyone under the age of 18 may be construed as providing preparation for entrance into the military.” But, it stressed, that was not its position.  The audit also found about $1.2 million in donations to “projects conducted in the Occupied Territories.” However, the names of the projects are blacked out.  The CRA said a charity’s work cannot contradict Canadian public policy. Canada, it stated, does not recognize Israel’s permanent control over territories seized in the 1967 Six-Day War. “Providing assistance to Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories serves to encourage and enhance the permanency of the infrastructure and settlements, and therefore is contrary to Canada’s public policy and international law,” the CRA said.

The Canadian Revenue Agency's 94 page file and report contains the determination letter and is an interesting read.   For other media coverage see AlJazeera, Middle East Monitor, and Global News.  

Darryll K. Jones

January 30, 2019 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 21, 2019

Canada Revenue Agency proposes guidance "Public policy dialogue and development activities by charities"

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) issued draft administrative guidance "Public policy dialogue and development activities by charities," and is accepting comments on the proposed guidance until April 18. The guidance instructs charities that commentary on public policy must further its core mission, and prohibits activity that supports or opposes a political candidate.

January 21, 2019 in International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

UK's Cabinet Office Urges Charities to Speak Out about Public Grants

Apparently in response to increasing use of "gagging clauses" in grants that forbid public commentary on public grants, the United Kingdom's Cabinet Office recently urged charities to report improper behavior and wasteful government grants "without fear of consequences." From the full story at Third Sector, "The new rules have been prompted by concerns in the media that charities working on the Department for Work and Pensions’ universal credit programme were unable to speak about their concerns with how the programme was being delivered because of clauses in government contracts."

It will be interesting to see if this move actually emboldens charity whistleblowing, or if more concrete protections are needed.

-JWM

December 4, 2018 in In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 2, 2018

Legal Crackdown on NGOs in Pakistan

Aa-logo-x2According to BBC News, early last month the Pakistani government ordered eighteen international nongovernmental organizations to end their operations and leave the country within 60 days. Among those charities are ActionAid UK, a development organization that works with women and girls living in poverty, and Plan International USA, a development organization that focuses on communities. While previous attempts to force ActionAid and other organizations to leave Pakistan failed in the face of diplomatic pressure from Western government, the most recent report indicates that this attempt is still proceeding.

Hattip: Nonprofit Quarterly (which includes a list with all 18 entities, including World Vision and Catholic Relief Services)

Lloyd Mayer

November 2, 2018 in In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

Charities Regulation on the International Front: Emerging Issues in Globalization

The Nonprofit Management Program at Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies is presenting its next Master Class in the program's Professional Development Series on November 15, 2018:  "Charities Regulation on the International Front: Emerging Issues in Globalization."

A description of the program:

Regulation and enforcement in the charitable sector are increasingly global in scope. Whether addressing cross-border charitable solicitation, oversight issues within religiously based organizations, terrorism concerns, money laundering, or the burgeoning technological platforms that enable new and expanded reach for these activities internationally, charities regulators are on the front lines of some of the most cutting-edge international legal issues. Join us for a deep-dive discussion with our panel of experts discussing the new globalized context of charities regulation.

Panelists:

James G. Sheehan, Chief, Charities Bureau, New York State Attorney General's Office

Ruth M. Madrigal Partner, Steptoe & Johnson LLP, Former Attorney-Advisor, Office of Tax Policy Department of the Treasury

Marcus S. Owens Partner, Loeb & Loeb, Former Director, Exempt Organizations Division of the Internal Revenue Service

Sarah Atkinson, Director of Policy and Communications Charity Commission for England and Wales

Tony Manconi, Director General, Charities Directorate Canada Revenue Agency

Moderator: Cindy M. Lott, Esq., Academic Director, Nonprofit Management Programs and Senior Lecturer'

 

NMirkay

October 23, 2018 in Conferences, Current Affairs, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

New Zealand Denies Greenpeace Charitable Status because its Views on Environment Wouldn't Benefit the Public

Earlier this year, New Zealand denied charity status to Greenpeace because it found its policy positions to be contrary to the public interest. Under New Zealand law, charitable activities may involve seeking policy changes, but the purpose must be in furtherance of the public benefit. (For thorough coverage of New Zealand charity law, see this book by Poirier.) The registration board rejected Greenpeace's application on two grounds: image from world.350.org

  1. Greenpeace promotes its points of view on the environment and other issues in ways that cannot be found to be for the benefit of the public.
  2. Greenpeace and its members’ involvement in illegal activities amounts to an illegal purpose which disqualifies it from registration.

On the first point, the Charities Registration Board reasoned:

Although the Supreme Court in Greenpeace held that advocacy can be charitable, it indicated that promoting a cause or advocating a particular viewpoint will not often be charitable. This is because it is not possible to say whether the views promoted are for the public benefit in the way the law recognises as charitable.

The Board considers that Greenpeace’s focus is on advocating its point of view on environmental issues such fossil fuel exploration and the expansion of intensive dairy farming.  Most of Greenpeace’s environmental advocacy cannot be determined to be in the public benefit when all the potential consequences of adopting its views are taken into account.

The Board noted that advocacy for protection of the environment could be considered charitable, but Greenpeace's positions were simply too extreme to be considered in the public benefit. For example, the Board acknowledged that "in general" advocacy for sustainability is charitable, Greenpeace's concern about climate change and advocacy for specific policies such as the role of fossil fuels "is a complex issue that requires in-depth consideration of the potential consequences of New Zealand's international obligations and interests, environmental risks, the importance of fossil fuels in New Zealand's economy, the competing interests of industries, economic costs, and New Zealand's dealings with other nations." Finding Greenpeace's position on policy to not consider the other criteria, the Board couldn't find that "the views promoted by Greenpeace on climate change are of a benefit in the way that the law recognises as charitable."

The rejection of Greenpeace's application on the first ground may seem surprising to those in the US. Although there was once a time when governments in the US weighed whether an organization's policy viewpoints were in the public interest (and while some who dislike the NRA, the ACLU, or other advocacy grounds have urged a return to the discretionary denial of yesteryear), those days have largely passed, in no small part to Constitutional/First Amendment concerns.

Back to New Zealand, Greenpeace appealed an earlier board decision against it, so it will be interesting to see if this is heading up the courts again.

May 8, 2018 in Current Affairs, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 26, 2018

Webb: 99% of UK charities should lose their charitable status

image from www.ft.com

Merryn Somerset Webb penned an op-ed in The Financial Times entitled The charitable giving model is an undemocratic use of funds. Focused on the UK, the piece proposes that "99 per cent of the organisations with charitable status in the UK should have it removed." Instead, tax subsidies would apply to a limited number of official charities that would be tightly regulated. Read the entire piece at: https://www.ft.com/content/1093fcec-187a-11e8-9376-4a6390addb44 

February 26, 2018 in Current Affairs, In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 19, 2018

Nonprofits, Governance, and #MeToo

MeTooThe #MeToo movement has reached several major nonprofit organizations, raising serious accountability and governance questions. For example:

  • According to NPR, the General Counsel and Chief International Officer of the American Red Cross resigned in the wake of a report from ProPublica that several years ago ARC had forced a senior official to resign amid sexual harassment and assault allegations but still provided a positive review of his performance to another nonprofit interested in hiring him. 
  • Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres) announced that in 2017 it had dealt with 24 cases of alleged sexual harassment, resulting in the dismissal of 19 people, in an attempt to distinguish itself from the Oxfam and the scandal enveloping that organization (see below), according to Reuters.
  • The CEO of the Humane Society of the United States resigned in the wake of sexual harassment allegations, after fighting the allegations for weeks and even though a majority of the organization's board voted to immediately end an investigation into his behavior, according to the N.Y. Times. Additional coverage: NPR.
  • The Times of London reported that in 2011 Oxfam International covered up the use of prostitutes by senior aid workers in Haiti. Trying to get ahead of the growing scandal, Oxfam has promised to appoint an independent commission to investigate claims of sexual exploitation, according to The Guardian
  • The Presidents Club, a prominent United Kingdom charity that raised money from the British elite to fund grants to other charitable organizations, closed after The Guardian conducted an undercover investigation that revealed alleged groping and sexual harassment at the charity's most recent men-only fundraising dinner. Additional coverage: CNN.

In a Monkey Cage column in today's Washington Post, Nives Dolsak, Sirindah (Christianna) Parr, and Aseem Prakash, all at the University of Washington at Seattle, argue the presumption of virtue for nonprofits often leads to regulators and stakeholders neglecting issues of accountability and governance. (UPDATE: For a contrary perspective, see this Nonprofit Quarterly column by Ruth McCambridge and Steve Dubb.)  At the same time, even the above examples illustrate everything from an apparently robust response to allegations of sexual harassment in the case of Doctors Without Borders to the alleged creation of an environment that encouraged such harassment in the case of the Presidents Club. What appears inescapable, however, is that nonprofits, like for-profits, have to invest in developing procedures to properly handle such complaints and deal with alleged harassers.

Lloyd Mayer

February 19, 2018 in In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Nehme: Australian Charities and Not-for-Profit Commission

NehmeMarina Nehme (UNSW Australia) has written Australian Charities and Not-for-Profit Commission: Enforcement Tools and Regulatory Approaches, 45 Australian Business Law Review 79 (2017). Here is the abstract:

The Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission (ACNC) commenced operation on 3 December 2012 after a decade of inquiries and recommendations about the establishment of an independent “one-stop-shop” regulator for the charity sector. The introduction of this regulator is a move that recognises the unique and distinctive role that charities play in Australia. This article reviews the sanctions available to the ACNC. It considers some key aspects of the ACNC’s regulatory approach to date and discusses the benefits arising from this approach. The article then assesses whether the current enforcement regime available to the regulator supports the continued implementation of such a regulatory approach and empowers the ACNC to enforce the provisions in the legislation or whether some changes may be needed.

Lloyd Mayer

November 19, 2017 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Another Crackdown on Foreign NGOs - Will the G20 Try to Address This Issue?

Download (2)The N.Y. Times reports that the Cambodian Prime Minister has ordered U.S.-based Agape International Missions to end its operations in that country after it was featured in a CNN report on the sex trade there. As detailed in the story, the Prime Minister accused the NGO of possibly misleading CNN regarding the extent of the sex trade in Cambodia and thereby violating the terms of its operating agreement with the government. At this time it is not clear how Agape will respond or whether the Prime Minister's statements have in fact led to the expulsion of the group from that country.

Regardless of the details of this particular situation, there is a growing trend of foreign NGOs, domestic NGOs with foreign support, and sometimes domestic NGOs more generally being targeted for burdensome regulation or worse by the governments of many countries, as I have detailed in this space previously. These concerns have led Helmut K. Anheier (President of the Hertie School of Governance in Germany) to call on the G20 to address this issue in a recent G20 Policy Paper. Here is the abstract:

The roles of non-governmental or civil society organizations have become more complex, especially in the context of changing relationships with nation states and the international community. In many instances, state–civil society relations have worsened, leading experts to speak of a “shrinking space” for civil society nationally as well as internationally. The author proposes to initiate a process for the establishment of an independent high-level commission of eminent persons (i) to examine the changing policy environment for civil society organizations in many countries as well as internationally, (ii) to review the reasons behind the shrinking space civil society encounters in some parts of the world and its steady development in others, and (iii) to make concrete proposals for how the state and the international system on the one hand and civil society on the other hand can relate in productive ways in national and multilateral contexts.

Lloyd Mayer

August 17, 2017 in In the News, International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 23, 2017

Many Countries Continue to Tighten Restrictions on NGOs

Closing SpaceThis may be because I have been writing in this area (shameless plug), but there seem to be numerous recent stories about various countries increasing the legal restrictions on nonprofits and especially nonprofits with foreign connections. Here are several examples:

In India, the government refused a license to receive foreign funds to Compassion International, a Christian child sponsorship group, forcing the nonprofit to abandon its services to 145,000 children in India after 48 years in the country. If this had been an isolated incident the government's concerns about proselytization might have been plausible, but the N.Y. Times noted that Compassion was only the most recent of 11,000 nonprofits that had similarly lost such licenses since 2014.

In Turkey, the government revoked the registration of Mercy Corps, forcing that nonprofit to abandon its efforts based on Turkey to aid Syrian refugees, according to reports from the Washington Post and other news outlets. 

In Hungary, the government enacted laws to require nongovernmental organizations that receive foreign financing to publicly identify themselves and their donors in what some observers believed was an attempt to shut down nonprofits supported by George Soros, including the Central European University, as reported by the N.Y. Times.

In perhaps the most dramatic action, the President of Egypt signed a new law that imposes restrictions on all domestic nongovernmental organizations, regardless of their sources of funding, by making their work subject to approval by a new regulatory body that may be a front for interference by the country's security agencies, also as reported by the N.Y. Times.

Unfortunately there appear to be few viable ways for affected nonprofits to counter these new rules in most of the countries involved, as detailed in my forthcoming article linked to above.

Lloyd Mayer

June 23, 2017 in In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Blumberg, Canadian Registered Charities Revoked as a Result of Audit 1992-2017

Blumbergs-0928_crop_small_175_175_c1_c_cMark Blumberg (Blumberg Segal LLP) has put together a list, with relevant links, of all 447 Canadian registered charities that have had their charity status revoked by the Charities Directorate of the Canada Revenue Service over the past 25 years. For anyone interested in seeing what types of activities get Canadian charities into trouble with the federal tax authorities, this list could be invaluable. I am not aware of a similar compilation with respect to the IRS in the United States, although Terri Lynn Helge (Texas A&M) has an article in the Pittsburgh Tax Review (Rejecting Charity: Why the IRS Denies Tax Exemption to 501(c)93) Applicants) that looks at IRS denials of applications for recognition of exemption as a charity under section 501(c)(3).

Hat tip: globalphilanthropy.ca.

Lloyd Mayer

June 23, 2017 in International, Publications – Articles, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Interdisciplinary Nonprofit Studies: Recent Articles & Upcoming Conferences

IU PhilanthropyThe study of nonprofits goes well beyond the laws governing them, and there are a number of publications and organizations dedicated to that study. Here is a sampling of both recent articles and upcoming conferences from this broader academic space (the logo shown here is from the Indiana University-Purdue University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, which is hosting the first conference listed):

 

RECENT ARTICLES (click through to see tables of contents for these publications)

The Foundation Review, Volume 9, Issue 1 (2017): Exit Strategies

Nonprofit & Voluntary Sector QuarterlyApril 2017 Issue & June 2017 Issue

Nonprofit Policy Forum, January 2017 Issue

Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, April 2017 Issue & June 2017 Issue

 

UPCOMING CONFERENCES

Nonprofit Academic Centers Council Biennial ConferenceIndianapolis, July 31-August 2

Science of Philanthropy Initiative, Chicago, September 6-7, 2017

Comparing Third Sector Expansions Workshop, New York, October 4-7, 2017

ARNOVA Annual Conference, Grand Rapids, November 16-18, 2017

International Society for Third-Sector Research Conference, Amsterdam, July 10-13, 2018

 

Lloyd Mayer

June 23, 2017 in Conferences, International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 17, 2017

Mayer: The Challenge of Protecting Cross-Border Funding of NGOs

Mayer2015I have posted Globalization Without a Safety Net: The Challenge of Protecting Cross-Border Funding of NGOs, 102 Minnesota Law Review (forthcoming). Here is the abstract:

More than 50 countries around the world have sharply increased legal restrictions on both domestic non-governmental organizations (“NGOs”) that receive funding from outside their home country and the foreign NGOs that provide such funding and other support. These restrictions include requiring advance government approval before a domestic NGO can accept cross-border funding, requiring such funding to be routed through government agencies, and prohibiting such funding for NGOs engaged in certain activities. Publicly justified by national security, accountability, and other concerns, these measures often go well beyond what is reasonably supported by such legitimate interests. These restrictions therefore violate international law, which provides that the right to receive such funding is an essential aspect of freedom of association. Yet affected NGOs cannot rely on the international human rights treaties that codify this right because those treaties have limited reach and lack effective avenues for remedying these violations.

There is, however, a growing web of international investment treaties designed to protect cross-border flows of funds, leading some supporters of cross-border funding for NGOs to argue that NGOs can instead use these investment treaties to protect such funding. In this Article, I provide the most thorough consideration of this proposal to date, including taking into account not only the legal hurdles to invoking investment treaty protections in this context but also the practical hurdles based on recently gathered information regarding the costs to parties who pursue claims under these treaties. I conclude that while it may be possible to overcome both sets of hurdles in some situations, these hurdles are higher than previous commentators have acknowledged. In particular, overcoming the high costs of bringing claims under these treaties would at a minimum require a concerted effort to fund or reduce such costs through either securing substantial third party financing or recruiting significant pro bono assistance.

Given these obstacles to invoking the protections of international investment treaties, I then explore the insights that the remarkable growth in such treaties provide regarding the conditions that would need to exist for countries to be convinced to enact a similar set of agreements to protect cross-border funding of NGOs. I conclude that such conditions are currently absent and that it will take many years to see if they could develop, even assuming that many countries continue to increasingly restrict or effectively prohibit such funding. In the meantime, both recipients and providers of cross-border funding for NGOs will need to consider alternate strategies that do not rely on international law to counter such restrictions.

Lloyd Mayer

March 17, 2017 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Global Philanthropy: One Step Forward, Two Steps Back?

GlobeRecent events and news stories highlight the uncertain future of global philanthropy. On one hand, the Hudson Institute recently celebrated global philanthropy as it transferred its Index of Global Philanthropy and Remittances and its Index of Philanthropy Freedom to the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, and the Christian Science Monitor reported late last year that China is encouraging domestic philanthropy by its growing number of billionaires.  On the other hand, various news outlets have reported on numerous countries cracking down on foreign charities and foreign-funded domestics charities, including:

  • Hungary, where the Budapest Beacon reported earlier this year that the government is attacking allegedly "fake civil organizations," including the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, the Hungarian Civil Liberties Union, and Transparency International.
  • India, where the N.Y. Times reported last week that the child-sponsorship organization Compassion International is ending its support of 145,000 children in that country, joining more than 11,000 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that have lost their licenses to accept foreign funds since 2014. According to an earlier L.A. Times story from earlier this year, those NGOs include a domestic charity that fought caste-based discrimination for decades. (The N.Y. Times also reported that U.S. officials are trying to resolve the Compassion International case through diplomatic channels.)
  • Kenya, where a watchdog group reported late last year that government authorities froze the bank accounts of a U.S. NGO carrying out an electoral assistance program ahead of this year's general elections.

Tomorrow I will do a post about my recent article addressing these trends and the limited legal options NGOs currently have for countering them.

Lloyd Mayer

March 16, 2017 in In the News, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

New Issue of VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations

6Volume 27, Issue 6 (December 2016) of VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations is now available. Here is the table of contents:

  • Disentangling the Financial Vulnerability of Nonprofits
    Pablo de Andres-Alonso, Inigo Garcia-Rodriguez & M. Elena Romero-Merino
  • Exploring the Nexus of Nonprofit Financial Stability and Financial Growth
    Grace L. Chikoto-Schultz & Daniel Gordon Neely
  • Doing Well by Returning to the Origin. Mission Drift, Outreach and Financial Performance of Microfinance Institutions
    Matteo Pedrini & Laura Maria Ferri
  • Funding and Financial Regulation for Third Sector Broadcasters: What Can Be Learned From the Australian and Canadian Experiences?
    Fernando Méndez Powell
  • Funding Civil Society? Bilateral Government Support for Development NGOs
    David Suárez & Mary Kay Gugerty
  • Resource Dependence In Non-profit Organizations: Is It Harder To Fundraise If You Diversify Your Revenue Structure?
    Ignacio Sacristán López de los Mozos, Antonio Rodríguez Duarte & Óscar Rodríguez Ruiz
  • Resisting Hybridity in Community-Based Third Sector Organisations in Aotearoa New Zealand
    Jenny Aimers & Peter Walker
  • NPO Financial Statement Quality: An Empirical Analysis Based on Benford’s Law
    Tom Van Caneghem
  • A Review of Research on Nonprofit Communications from Mission Statements to Annual Reports
    Lawrence Souder
  • NGOs in the News: The Road to Taken-for-Grantedness
    Angela Marberg, Hans van Kranenburg & Hubert Korzilius
  • Understanding Contemporary Challenges to INGO Legitimacy: Integrating Top-Down and Bottom-Up Perspectives
    Oliver Edward Walton, Thomas Davies, Erla Thrandardottir & Vincent Charles Keating
  • Sensegiving, Leadership, and Nonprofit Crises: How Nonprofit Leaders Make and Give Sense to Organizational Crisis
    Curt A. Gilstrap, Cristina M. Gilstrap, Kendra Nigel Holderby & Katrina Maria Valera
  • Organizational Crisis Resistance: Examining Leadership Mental Models of Necessary Practices to Resist Crises and the Role of Organizational Context
    Jurgen Willems
  • Ideology, Practice, and Process? A Review of the Concept of Managerialism in Civil Society Studies
    Johan Hvenmark
  • Toward More Targeted Capacity Building: Diagnosing Capacity Needs Across Organizational Life Stages
    Fredrik O. Andersson, Lewis Faulk & Amanda J. Stewart
  • Dimensions of Capacity in Nonprofit Human Service Organizations
    William A. Brown, Fredrik O. Andersson & Suyeon Jo
  • The Effect of Attitudinal and Behavioral Commitment on the Internal Assessment of Organizational Effectiveness: A Multilevel Analysis
    Patrick Valeau, Jurgen Willems & Hassen Parak
  • Testing an Economic Model of Nonprofit Growth: Analyzing the Behaviors and Decisions of Nonprofit Organizations, Private Donors, and Governments
    You Hyun Kim & Seok Eun Kim
  • Book Review, David Fishel: The Book of the Board: Effective Governance for Non-profit Organisations (3rd edition)
    Chris Cornforth
  • Book Review, Block, Stephen R.: Social Work and Boards of Directors: The Relationship Model
    Raquel Rego
  • Book Review, Judith McMorland, Ljiljana Eraković, Stepping Through Transitions: Management, Leadership & Governance in Not-for-Profit Organisations
    Dyana P. Mason
  • Erratum to: Dependent Interdependence: The Complicated Dance of Government–Nonprofit Relations in China
    Zhang Yuanfeng
  • Erratum to: Institutional Variation Among Russian Regional Regimes: Implications for Social Policy and the Development of Non-governmental Organizations
    Thomas F. Remington
  • Erratum to: Modernizing State Support of Nonprofit Service Provision: The Case of Kyrgyzstan
    Yulia Shapovalova
  • Erratum to: France: A Late-Comer to Government–Nonprofit Partnership
    Edith Archambault
  • Erratum to: New Winds of Social Policy in the East
    Linda J. Cook
  • Erratum to: The Long-Term Evolution of the Government–Third Sector Partnership in Italy: Old Wine in a New Bottle?
    Costanzo Ranci
  • Erratum to: Poland: A New Model of Government–Nonprofit Relations for the East?
    Sławomir Nałęcz, Ewa Leś & Bartosz Pieliński

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Backer: Commentary on the New Charity Undertakings Law (China)

Backer (1)Larry Catá Backer (Pennsylvania State University) has posted Commentary on the New Charity Undertakings Law: Socialist Modernization Through Collective Organizations, The China Non Profit Law Review (Tsinghua University) (forthcoming 2016). Here is the abstract:

China’s new Charity Law represents the culmination of over a decade of planning for the appropriate development of the productive forces of the charity sector in aid of socialist modernization. Together with the related Foreign NGO Management Law, it represents an important advance in the organization of the civil society sector within emerging structures of Socialist Rule of Law principles. While both Charity and Foreign NGO Management Laws could profitably be considered as parts of a whole, each merits discussion for its own unique contribution to national development. One can understand, both the need to manage Chinese civil society within the context of charity ideals, and the need to constrain foreign non-governmental organizations to ensure national control over its own development. Moreover, the decision to invite global comment also evidenced Chinese understanding of the global ramifications of its approach to the management of its civil society, and its importance in the global discourse about consensus standards for that management among states. This becomes more important as Chinese civil society try to emerge onto the world stage. This essay considers the role of the Charity Law in advancing Socialist Modernization through the realization of the Chinese Communist Party(CCP) Basic Line. The essay is organized as follows: Section II considers the specific provisions of the Charity Law, with some reference to changes between the first draft and the final version of the Charity Law. Section III then considers some of the more theoretical considerations that suggest a framework for understanding the great contribution of the Charity Law as well as the challenges that remain for the development of the productive forces of the civil society sector at this historical stage of China’s development.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Chan: The Function (or Malfunction) of Equity in the Charity Law of Canada's Federal Courts

Chan-profileKathryn Chan (University of Victoria) has posted (on SSRN) The Function (or Malfunction) of Equity in the Charity Law of Canada's Federal Courts, 2 Canadian Journal of Comparative and Contemporary Law 33 (2016). Here is the abstract:

This essay explores what, if anything, it means for the Federal Court of Appeal to be a “court of equity” in the exercise of its jurisdiction over matters related to charitable registration under the Income Tax Act. The equitable jurisdiction over charities encompasses a number of curative principles, which the Court of Chancery traditionally invoked to save indefinite or otherwise defective charitable gifts. The author identifies some of these equitable principles and contemplates how their invocation might have altered the course of certain unsuccessful charitable registration appeals. She then considers the principal arguments for and against the Federal Court of Appeal applying these equitable principles when adjudicating matters related to registered charity status.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Erie: Sharia, Charity, and Minjian Autonomy in Muslim China

ErieMatthew S. Erie (Oxford) has posted (on SSRN) Sharia, Charity, and Minjian Autonomy in Muslim China: Gift Giving in a Plural World, 43 American Ethnologist 311 (2016). Here is the abstract:

In Marcel Mauss's analysis, the gift exists in the context of a homogenous system of values. But in fact, different types of normative systems can inhabit the same social field. This is the case among Hui, the largest Muslim minority group in China, for whom the “freedom” of the gift resides in the giver's capacity to follow the rules underlying gifting, in this case, the rules of sharia. I call this capacity “minjian (unofficial, popular) autonomy.” Hui follow sharia in pursuit of a good life, but their practices are also informed by mainstream Han Chinese gift practices and by the anxieties of the security state. In their gifting practices, Hui thus endeavor to reconcile the demands of Islamic, postsocialist, and gift economies.

Lloyd Mayer

November 15, 2016 in International, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)