Tuesday, November 1, 2022

Texas Tribune & ProPublica Investigate Churches Politicking

The Texas Tribune and Propublica published an investigation into churches, politicking and lack of IRS enforcement and quote a couple members, including myself, of this blog. From the article:

"At one point, churches fretted over losing their tax-exempt status for even unintentional missteps. But the IRS has largely abdicated its enforcement responsibilities as churches have become more brazen. In fact, the number of apparent violations found by ProPublica and the Tribune, and confirmed by three nonprofit tax law experts, are greater than the total number of churches the federal agency has investigated for intervening in political campaigns over the past decade, according to records obtained by the news organizations." . . . 

"Among the violations the newsrooms identified: In January, an Alaska pastor told his congregation that he was voting for a GOP candidate who is aiming to unseat Republican U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski, saying the challenger was the “only candidate for Senate that can flat-out preach.” During a May 15 sermon, a pastor in Rocklin, California, asked voters to get behind “a Christian conservative candidate” challenging Gov. Gavin Newsom. And in July, a New Mexico pastor called Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham “beyond evil” and “demonic” for supporting abortion access. He urged congregants to “vote her behind right out of office” and challenged the media to call him out for violating the Johnson Amendment."

Though the story is perhaps not news to those who follow this topic closely, it's a good piece, documenting pretty clear violations of the prohibition on charities from intervening in a political campaign. It has some nice history on the adoption of the amendment that I found useful alone. It also gives nice context for the PACI project where the IRS actually began actively looking at political activities in general, where many of the charities were indeed churches.

Though it is true that the IRS has barely enforced this provision over the years, the fact that there is a large effort among some churches to vigorously move into the politicking space today that is documented in this story is of concern. The biggest policy reason to focus in on this issue is summarized pretty well by the following quote by Andrew Seidel, vice president of strategic communications for the advocacy group Americans United for Separation of Church and State: “If you pair the ability to wade into partisan politics with a total absence of financial oversight and transparency, you’re essentially creating super PACs that are black holes.” 

Philip Hackney

 

November 1, 2022 in Church and State, Current Affairs, Federal – Executive, Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 28, 2022

S Corporations and Charitable Contributions

In light of the recent changes to the AGI limitations for charitable contributions, it is interesting to explore charitable giving in the S Corporation context.  In 2019, a CPA Journal article noted that unique planning opportunities exist for charitably minded S corporation shareholders.  For example, the rule that limits the pass-through deduction to the shareholder’s basis in S corporation stock and debt is not applicable when the S corporation donates appreciated property to a charity.  Thus, even if a shareholder has a zero basis in his/her S corporation stock, appreciated property donated to a charity would pass through as a charitable contribution.  In effect, the deduction becomes the portion limited by (and reducing) basis, plus the appreciation in the donated property. This interesting article addresses the incentives Congress has provided since 2006, which are still applicable under the TCJA.

 

Khrista McCarden

Hoffman Fuller Associate Professor of Tax Law

Tulane Law School 

October 28, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 6, 2022

California Governor Vetoes Tax Exemption & Insurrection Bill

DownloadLate last month, California Governor Gavin Newsom vetoed a bill (SB 834) that would have revoked the tax-exempt status of nonprofit in California that the state Attorney General determined engaged in treason, insurrection, conspiracy, government overthrow, or mutiny by members of the military as defined under federal law. Here is the governor's explanation for the veto:

Without question, extremist groups that participate in anti-government acts such as those that took place during the insurrection on January 6, 2021 should be renounced and investigated for their participation. However, these are issues that should be evaluated through the judicial system with due process and a right to a hearing.

The legislature has 60 days (excluding joint recess days) to override the veto by a two-thirds vote in both houses. And in the unlikely event that occurs (the best information I could find states there has not been an override for over 40 years), the law would almost certainly face constitutional challenge.

Coverage: CBS News/Bay City News Service; California GlobeLaw360.

October 6, 2022 in Federal – Executive, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 15, 2022

Patagonia Billionaire Commits Company Stock to Trust/Nonprofit

Sept. 15, 2022

The NYTimes published an article yesterday describing how Yvon Chouinard and his family have transferred all ownership of Patagonia, the company they own to a Trust and to a nonprofit organization that is organized and operated as a social welfare organization exempt from tax under section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code. The intent is described as "to combat climate change and protect undeveloped land around the globe."

Apparently, the family transferred two percent of shares to the Patagonia Purpose Trust, controlled by the family while they transferred 98 percent to an organization called Holdfast Collective that the story states is organized as a social welfare organization. 

I sure like conservation efforts, but have concerns about the way the NYTimes seems to treat this contribution less critically than it did a recent one by Barre Seid. It even compares the two. In that process, the author makes a number of claims that are off or sometimes wrong, at least in implication.

For instance, from the article: "Because the Holdfast Collective is a 501(c)(4), which allows it to make unlimited political contributions, the family received no tax benefit for its donation." They later compare the contribution by Barre Seid to a 501(c)(4) as well and claim the same.

It is incorrect that there is no tax benefit and it is also wrong to say that a section 501(c)(4) can make unlimited political contributions.

First, a clear tax benefit is that there is no gift tax owed on the transfer to a social welfare organization. The article properly noted that there was such a gift tax paid on the transfer to the family trust. Second, just like in Barre Seid, the transfer does not trigger a gain for income tax purposes on the contribution of highly appreciated assets - the Patagonia stock in this case. We don't know that appreciation, but given this is the founder, it is likely that the realized gain that no tax is paid upon here is large. Point is both Barre Seid and Chouinard obtained tax benefits. 

Second, while it is true that a social welfare organization is not prohibited from intervening in a political campaign as tax law prohibits of a charity, such activity does not further a social welfare purpose. The article seems to suggest that Holdfast could only support political campaigns, but it could not. It must engage primarily in social welfare activity. It is possible that the reporter was using that term loosely and intending to include lobbying within the conception of "political contributions". A social welfare organization can spend 100 percent on lobbying as long as that lobbying furthers its social welfare purpose.

Also, posting the breathless comments of the person who helped Chouinard set the transfer in motion uncritically is below what I would expect from the NYTimes. See for instance: "“There was a meaningful cost to them doing it, but it was a cost they were willing to bear to ensure that this company stays true to their principles,” said Dan Mosley, a partner at BDT & Co., a merchant bank that works with ultrawealthy individuals including Warren Buffett, and who helped Patagonia design the new structure. “And they didn’t get a charitable deduction for it. There is no tax benefit here whatsoever.” 

Again, that last statement is just not true.

It appears the difference that the reporter may be referring to between Seid and Chouinard is that in Seid, (1) Seid did not give all his fortune and (2) immediately upon the transfer of stock in Seid the social welfare organization sold the stock; Chouinard no longer personally holds Patagonia stock and the social welfare organization in this case is going to continue to hold the stock of Patgonia rather than selling it off. 

The difficulty in seeing the tax benefit here may be in that essential fact. It may be that some assume that as long as you haven't sold stock in some cash transaction there is no tax due. But that is not how things work. Any transfer of stock for any value can trigger tax. In fact, had Mr. Chouinard transferred the stock to a section 527 political organization, under section 84 of the Code, it would have had to pay tax on the difference between his basis and the stock's current FMV.  Many have argued that section 84 ought to be extended to contributions of appreciated assets to social welfare organizations. 

I think the case of the Chouinards suggests that section 84 should be so extended to a social welfare organization. Though Chouinard gave up a charitable contribution deduction, he also gains lots of ability to continue to control the use of that money as the article itself acknowledges. At the same time, he faces no gift tax and any sales of the stock will go without taxation. While there are some guard rails, they simply are nowhere near what would have happened had he transferred it to a charitable private foundation and face the rules under 501(c)(3) and 4940-4946. Thus, he can use these dollars earned at the nonprofit level tax free to accomplish purposes he and his family want to accomplish without any charitable limitations, including as the article notes political purposes. Note that Patagonia still is a for profit corporation that should still be paying tax at the corporate level.

Philip Hackney

 

September 15, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

Newman's Own Tax Provision

I'm pretty sure it was the salsa (mild, because my parents don't do spice), though it may have been the ranch dressing (a break from our usual Hidden Valley Ranch), that introduced me to Paul Newman. It was only later that I fell in love with The Sting and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. First, though, came the Newman's Own brand.

In the early 1980s, Newman started making and selling food. Initially, he wanted 100% of the company's profits to go to charity. When he died in 2008, Newman left the stock in his for-profit company to the Newman's Own Foundation, a private foundation (that, as I discussed yesterday, is the target of a lawsuit by two of Paul Newman's daughters).

Continue reading

August 30, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 5, 2022

Miami Herald Story on FPL Supporting Spoiler Democratic Candidate Through Dark Money

The Miami Herald has an interesting look at how Florida Power and Light used different means to support candidates in a Florida state senate race, including PACS and social welfare organizations. 

From the story:

"A strong Democratic challenger was threatening to unseat a friendly Republican incumbent in a Gainesville-area state Senate race in 2018. FPL, one of the country’s largest utilities, needed to make sure the GOP held onto the seat.

So FPL used a shadowy nonprofit group to secretly bankroll a spoiler candidate, a longtime Democrat named Charles Goston, according to new documents obtained by the Miami Herald. Running as a no-party candidate in the general election, Goston helped split the liberal vote, siphoning off enough votes from the Democratic challenger to swing the race to the GOP incumbent.

The documents show that FPL sent $200,000 to the nonprofit, a Washington D.C.-based group called Broken Promises, in the fall of 2018. Within five weeks, Broken Promises had donated $20,000 to Goston’s political committee and spent roughly $115,000 on mailers and advertising supporting him. Best of all for FPL: Because of its nonprofit status, Broken Promises didn’t have to disclose its donors — meaning the cash was untraceable. No one would know that FPL had paid to secretly manipulate a state election in favor of Republicans. Voters were in the dark about who funded Goston and why."

Read more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article264196761.html#storylink=cpy 

Philip Hackney

August 5, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, State – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 4, 2022

Representatives Ask IRS About Church Status of Family Research Council

Propublica reported a few weeks ago that the IRS had granted church status to a right-wing think tank, the Family Research Council. Sam Brunson blogged on here about why FRC might be interested in obtaining this special status.

Now, 40 Democratic representatives from the US House have sent a letter to the Treasury Department and the IRS asking them to explain this decision. Here is the letter.

"We are writing to express concern regarding the Family Research Council’s (FRC) tax-exempt status as an “association of churches.” In addition, we request a review of the existing Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance related to political advocacy organizations self-identifying as “churches” to obtain the status of churches, integrated auxiliaries, and conventions or associations of churches.

As you know, Congress has enacted many special tax rules that apply to churches and religious organizations. Under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code), churches are tax exempt organizations and are not required to file IRS Form 990, which provides transparency on tax-exempt organizations’ board members, key staff salaries, donations, and large payments to contractors. Further, there are special limitations on how and when the IRS can conduct an
examination of churches. In accordance with section 7611 of the Code, the IRS cannot conduct tax inquiries of churches without approval from a “high-level Treasury official.”

Philip Hackney

August 4, 2022 in Church and State, Current Affairs, Federal – Executive, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 28, 2022

Representative Introduces Bill to Replace Form 1023EZ

Representatives Betsy McCollum and Fred Upton introduced a bill on Tuesday to replace the Form 1023EZ. The bill is entitled the Nonprofit Sector Strength and Partnership Act of 2022.

The bill, among other things, would create a White House Office on Nonprofit Sector Partnership and an Interagency Council on Nonprofit Sector Partnership. 

From Rep. McCollum's press release

Congresswoman Betty McCollum (MN-04) and Congressman Fred Upton (MI-06) have introduced the Nonprofit Sector Strength and Partnership Act of 2022 to strengthen the nonprofit sector and its relationship with the federal government. The legislation will improve access to data about the nonprofit sector, and leverage the mission, knowledge, and impact of thousands of nonprofits to work together more effectively in pursuit of shared goals.

“In my home state of Minnesota, the nonprofit sector makes up nearly 14 percent of our workforce and generates $66 billion in annual revenue – which is why it is so important that the sector has a seat at the table when it comes to federal lawmaking,” Rep. Betty McCollum said. “Federal government, state, and local governments rely on the nonprofit sector and its ability to harness and direct the generosity, service, and volunteerism of the American people. Just as small businesses have the Small Business Administration (SBA) to facilitate access to federal resources, the nonprofit sector should be afforded this same level of support. I’m grateful to Independent Sector and other nonprofit leaders who have helped shape this idea into the legislation we’ve introduced today. Together, we can establish mechanisms that will enable nonprofits to better serve our communities.”

Philip Hackney

April 28, 2022 in Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Laws and Enforcement Governing the Political Activities of Tax Exempt Entities Hearing

The Senate Finance Committee's Subcommittee on Tax and IRS Oversight, chaired by Senator Whitehouse, is holding a hearing on May 4 on entitled Laws and Enforcement Governing the Political Activities of Tax Exempt Entities. 

It's a little odd to report on this one, because I am one of the witnesses who will present testimony.

The witness list includes

Philip Hackney, Associate Professor of Law, University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Pittsburgh, PA

Bradley A. Smith, Chairman and Founder, Institute for Free Speech, Washington, D.C. 

Ann M. Ravel, Former Chair (2015), United States Federal Election Commission, Los Gatos, CA

Scott Walter, President, Capital Research Center, Washington, D.C. 

I will be posting my testimony soon. I will try to post the other written testimony as well.

Philip Hackney

April 28, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

DAF Update: Biden Administration Tips Toe In; Studies and More Studies

Download (1)Cherry picking an issue flagged by the IRS in 2017 (Notice 2017-73) and addressed by one provision of the pending ACE Act (section 5), the Biden Administration's FY2023 Budget includes a provision (see page 132) that would bar private foundations from counting distributions to donor advised funds toward their minimum payout requirement under IRC 4942, except in limited circumstances (for more details, see pages 58-59 of the General Explanations of the Administration's revenue proposals). While passage of this provision is of course uncertain, it is important because it indicates that the Administration is at least tipping its toe into the DAF reform area. At the same time, 12 bipartisan members of the 43-member Ways and Means Committee issued a letter supporting DAFs and opposing recent DAF reform proposals. (Hat tip: Chronicle of Philanthropy (but incorrectly identifying the signers as all Republicans, when 7 of the 12 are Democrats)).

At the same time studies of DAFs continue to accumulate. The Institute of Policy Studies recently issued the results from two studies:

  • Private Foundation Giving to Commercial Donor-Advised Funds based on the IRS returns of private foundations that filed electronically from 2016 to 2018 and a list of the 45 largest commercial DAF sponsors, with the following findings: 
    • Private foundation giving to these commercial DAFs averaged $737 million per year from 2016 to 2018.
    • From 2016 to 2018, gifts from DAF-giving private foundations to these commercial DAFs averaged about $605,000 each, while their gifts to other recipients averaged just under $119,000 each.
    • 229 foundations gave $1 million or more to these commercial DAFs from 2016 to 2018.
    • Grants to these commercial DAFs made up one hundred percent of all charitable distributions for 157 foundations from 2016 to 2018.
  • Larger Community Foundations Have Become Heavily Reliant on Donor-Advised Funds based on the electronically filed IRS returns of 206 community foundations that participated in Candid's 2019 Columbus Survey, with the following findings:
    • DAFs accounted for a median 24 percent of assets.
    • A median 41 percent of all incoming contributions consisted of contributions to DAFs.
    • A median 42 percent of all outgoing grants were grants from DAFs.
    • Larger community foundations tend to be much more heavily reliant on DAFs for their incoming revenue streams; DAFs account for a much larger proportion of their outgoing grants; and DAFs make up a much larger proportion of their total assets.

The Donor Advised Fund Research Collaborative also recently made available the result of this study:

  • Donor-Advised Fund Account Patterns and Trends (2017-2020) based on 13,000 DAF accounts from 2017 to 2020 at 21 community foundations and religiously-affiliated DAF sponsors in the United States (but not including national, commercial DAFs), with findings including:
    • While 11% of DAFs had over $1 million in assets, the typical DAF is equally likely to be a small-sized DAF with assets under $50,000 or a medium-sized DAF with assets between $50,000 and $1 million.
    • The median four-year average payout rate among all accounts was 11%; among spendable DAFs, the median payout rate was 13%.
    • Large accounts over $1 million were 11% of all accounts and represented at least 85% of the assets in the DAFRC sample.
    • The majority of DAF contributions were received in the fourth quarter, including approximately 55% of dollars contributed and 42% of contribution transactions.

The Chronicle of Philanthropy also reported that giving from two of the largest sponsors of donor-advised funds grew slower in 2021 than in 2020.

Lloyd Mayer

 

April 13, 2022 in Federal – Executive, Federal – Legislative, In the News, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, March 22, 2022

Wyden and Crapo On Charitable Giving

Last week, the Senate Committee on Finance held a hearing on trends in charitable giving; the Committee heard from four witnesses. And over the next couple days I plan to look at (and, of course, blog about) what those witnesses said. But I thought the opening statements of Sen. Wyden, the Chair of the Committee, and Sen. Crapo, the Ranking Member, were interesting and worth a quick glance.

Both highlighted the work that nonprofits during the pandemic. Sen. Crapo praised nonprofits for "adapt[ing] to the COVID-19 situation incredibly well, often fulfilling their missions with fewer resources and volunteers or even cancelled events, all while ensuring the communities they serve were being helped." And Sen. Wyden found that "Americans stepped up when their neighbors needed help. Charitable giving reached new highs."

Both Senators set the stage for the government helping the charitable sector--from the Senators' introductions, it does not look like this was at all a critical hearing. Both Senators said that supporting the nonprofit sector has the bipartisan support of the whole committee. Sen. Crapo explained that his goals include using the tax policies to encourage giving while looking forward at new challenges (including crypto and crowdfunding).

And Sen. Wyden mentioned the fact that the doubling of the standard deduction had eliminated the tax benefits of charitable giving for a substantial portion of taxpayers. He seems to want to focus on extending the small above-the-line charitable deduction as well as provide direct aid to help nonprofit organizations keep their doors open.

It will be interesting to see what the witnesses said and where the federal government goes from here.

Samuel D. Brunson

March 22, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 14, 2022

Postal Reform Around the Corner -- Along with Higher Prices

POST OFFICE

Today's NonProfitTimes reminded us that postal reform legislation gained U.S. Senate approval by a wide margin last week, setting up President Joe Biden to quickly sign the measure.

The Postal Service Reform Act of 2022 (H.R. 3076) passed last month by a vote of 342-92 in the House of Representatives. Sponsored by Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), the measure gained approval from all 222 Democrats and 120 Republicans. Following House approval of the postal reform bill in February, Sen. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) objected, blocking the bill because of an apparent technicality.

Last Tuesday, however, the Senate approved its version of the legislation (S. 1720), by a vote of 79-19. The Senate’s 48 Democrats were joined by the two Independents and 29 Republicans in voting for the measure, sponsored by Chairman Gary Peters (D-Mich.), chairman of the Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee.

So what is the legislation all about?

According to the Times,

The Postal Service Reform Act is expected to save USPS $22.6 billion over 10 years by requiring new postal retirees to use Medicare as their primary insurance. Another $27 billion would be saved by the repeal of a pre-funding requirement for projected retiree healthcare costs that was included in the 2006 Postal Enhance and Accountability Act (PAEA). In addition to bipartisan support, the legislation had the backing of the National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC).

The new legislation comes with some costs for consumers:

New Consumer Price Index (CPI) data released last week is likely to push mailing rates higher than first envisioned. The Alliance of Nonprofit Mailers (ANM) estimates the average caps for each class of mail will increase between 6.789% and 8.789%. Actual increases will vary according to how USPS distributes the increase across rate cells and an organization’s mix of mail, according to Stephen Kearney, ANM’s executive director. 

“If USPS uses all the authority, it will lead to a second round of increases in less than a year,” Kearney said in an email to members on Friday. The ANM is advocating that the USPS defer at least some of the authorized rate increases given that it has $24 billion in cash, received a $10 billion grant for COVID relief last year, and will benefit from $107 billion in relief from the Postal Reform Act of 2022.

According to Kearney, USPS is expected to file in April with the Postal Regulatory Commission (PRC) no later than the next CPI release on April 12, and plans to use six months of CPI authority to raise rates again in January.

Prof. Vaughn E. James, Texas Tech University School of Law 

 

March 14, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 25, 2022

DAFs Update: Anonymous Giving Study, COF Community Foundation Recommendations, OpEds

LogoUPDATE: Fellow blogger Roger Colinvaux (Catholic) also responded to Katherine Enright's OpEd discussed below, in a Letter to the Editor titled The Status Quo Is Not Acceptable When It Comes to Donor-Advised Funds. And as previously noted in this space, he has written an article on the ACE Act, Speeding Up Benefits to Charity: Donor Advised Fund and Foundation Reform, Boston College Law Review (forthcoming).

Even as we await congressional action on the Accelerating Charitable Efforts (ACE) Act, studies, recommendations, and dueling opeds continue to emerge.

In terms of studies, Howard Husock at the American Enterprise Institute has posted a recent study on anonymous giving through DAFs that makes these points:

  • A review of grant data from the five largest sponsors of donor-advised funds—including the independent public charities, serviced by financial firms Fidelity, Vanguard, and Schwab—shows that anonymous grants comprise only 4.3 percent of all grants. It also shows that grants in the anonymous category that may include support for public policy matters include a small minority (12 percent) of that small group.
  • Most anonymous giving supports well-known and noncontroversial organizations, including American Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, and Salvation Army.
  • Any regulation designed to limit anonymous giving risks discouraging charity by donors that may choose anonymity for various reasons, including fear of public criticism, unwanted solicitation, or religiously motivated reasons.

Coverage: Chronicle of Philanthropy (including criticism of the study; subscription required). At the same time, Hayden Ludwig at the Capital Research Center posted a short report critical of the Silicon Valley Foundation, titled The Gilded Left’s Favorite Bay Area Bankroller

The Council on Foundations's Strengthening Community Philanthropy Ad Hoc Working Group also recently issued a set of recommendations for community foundations that hold donor-advised funds. The recommendations address the following issues:

Finally, Katherine Enright of the Council of Foundations wrote an OpEd titled Donor-Advised Funds Are Essential to Democratizing Philanthropy, which led to a response from a former director development titled Donor-Advised Funds Don’t Pass the Democracy Smell Test. And at the Wall Street Journal, Jeremy D. Tedesco of the Alliance Defending Freedom wrote a commentary pushing back the Unmasking Fidelity movement titled Cancel Culture Targets Charity: Left-wing political activists want to destroy America’s long tradition of private philanthropy.

It seems the DAF debate is quickly becoming a vehicle for a number of political arguments and divides. 

Lloyd Mayer

February 25, 2022 in Federal – Legislative, In the News, Studies and Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 23, 2022

Members of Congress Raise Concerns About Coach Compensation, Formerly For-Profit Florida Universities

Members of Congress have flagged two areas of concern relating to colleges and universities: the ever increasing salaries of FBS football head coaches; and for-profits converting to nonprofit status while still maintaining financial ties to insiders.

Photo-1Rep. Bill Pascrell (D-NJ), Chairman of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Oversight, has expanded his probe of college coaching salaries by sending letters to Stanford University and Rutgers University about their compensation of head football coaches. These letters follow ones to Michigan State University and University of Miami last month, and to LSU and USC late last year. All of the letters ask about highly compensated university employees generally as well as about the compensation of football and basketball coaches. They also ask about the contribution of athletics to the universities' educational missions, student financial aid, and the revenues, expenses, governance, and facilities of athletic departments. Hat tip: EO Tax Journal.

DownloadSeparately, the Washington Post reports that House Committee on Education and Labor is investigating payments relating to nonprofits Keiser University and Everglades University after they took over operation of previously for-profit institutions. The focus of the investigation is on millions of dollars received by Arthur Keiser, his family, and related businesses for various services, including chartered air travel and rent for properties used by the schools. See Committee Press Release (linking to a Letter from the Committee's Chairman to Education Secretary Miguel Cardona (incorrectly dated 2021)). The investigation is in the wake of a GAO report on the almost 60 conversions of for-profit colleges to nonprofit status from January 2011 to August 2020. Hat tip: Chronicle of Philanthropy.

Lloyd Mayer

 

 

February 23, 2022 in Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 9, 2022

Changes to DAF Rules Reintroduced on Capitol Hill

Late last week the NonProfit Times reported that Congressional representatives had introduced companion legislation that would set timelines on when donations to donor-advised funds (DAFs) would have to be distributed to working charities.

According to the Times, the Accelerating Charitable Efforts (ACE) Act, introduced by Rep. Chellie Pingree (D-Maine) and Rep. Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) with Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) and Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.), is similar to a measure introduced in the Senate last June by Senators Angus King (I-Maine) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa).

The legislation would update regulations for private foundations and set timelines for distributions from DAFs. The full text of the ACE Act can be accessed here.

In a prepared statement announcing the legislation, Rep. Pingree said: “For countless Mainers and people across the country, charitable organizations are life-changing and lifesaving,” yet $1 out of every $8 donated to charities goes to DAFs, giving generous tax breaks for charitable contributions but not ensuring that the funds help anyone in need. “Our half-century old philanthropy laws must be reformed to correct this fundamental flaw in our current system.”

The Initiative to Accelerate Charitable Giving (IACG), led in part by billionaire philanthropist John Arnold and Boston College law professor Ray Madoff, helped to develop the basis for the proposals. In a statement, IACG leaders noted that they were  “pleased that policymakers continue to seek a legislative solution to restore the connection between charitable tax benefits and direct contributions to charities.” They labeled the bill “a step toward getting more resources to our nation’s charities faster. . . a thoughtful and pragmatic approach that takes the policy ideas outlined in the coalition’s statement of principles and puts them into action at a time when charities across our communities need more help than ever.”

According to the Times report, 

Proponents of the federal reform estimate some $160 billion is set aside for future charitable gifts. While the funds are dedicated to charities once the contributions are made, there is no requirement to ever distribute them. Commercial DAFs, such as Fidelity Charitable and Schwab Charitable, have ballooned over the past decade, in part due to increasing contributions as well as appreciated assets to become some of the largest charities in the nation with tens of billions of dollars in assets.

As regards substance, the legislation would create two new types of DAFs:

  • 15-year DAFs would allow donors to receive upfront tax benefits as they do under current law but only if funds are distributed within 15 years of the donation.
  • 50-year DAFs would allow donors to elect an “aligned benefit rule,” continuing to receive capital gains and estate tax benefits upon donations but not the income tax deduction until all donated funds are distributed to charity. All funds would be required to be distributed to charities no later than 50 years after their donation.

Donors would be allowed to hold up to $1 million in DAF funds at any community foundation without being subject to payout rules. For amounts of more than $1 million, a donor would still receive up-front tax benefits if the DAF requires a 5% annual payout, or if donations must be distributed within 15 years of contribution.

For private foundations, salaries and travel expenses to a donor’s family members, or distributions to DAFs, could not be included in annual 5% payout obligations.

Opponents of the legislation have said that the measures to increase DAF distributions are solutions in search of a problem, noting that DAFs typically distribute at a higher annual rate than the 5% required of private foundations.

The NonProfit Times quotes Elizabeth McGuigan, director of policy at Philanthropy Roundtable, as saying in response to the House bill's introduction: “When people have the flexibility to give how, when and where they choose, it spurs even more generosity and uplifts those who we all wish to help. A bill that disincentivizes giving is tone deaf at best and at worst hurts communities around the country who rely upon their fellow Americans’ generosity.”

We shall see how the legislation fares this time.

Vaughn E. James, Judge Robert H. Bean Professor, Texas Tech University School of Law

 

 

February 9, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Legislation Proposed to Revoke International Olympic Committee's Tax Exempt Status

Reps. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.) and Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.) introduced a measure today intended to revoke the International Olympic Committee's exempt status in the United States.

From Politico: "Waltz and Wexton’s legislation, dubbed the Irresponsible Olympic Collaboration Act, specifically targets the IOC’s status as a 501c(4) tax-exempt organization by revoking that privilege for any international “multi-sport” organization that has revenues of more than $100 million." Wexton argues that social welfare organizations ought not host sporting events in China with ongoing genocide.

Have not found the text of the proposed legislation yet. However, you can see a resolution introduced on the issue back in December here. Be interested to see it, as the Politico story seems to suggest the bill was written neutrally yet would appear to apply to only one organization.

Update: Here is the link to the proposed bill. H/t to Sam Brunson

Philip Hackney

January 19, 2022 in Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (2)

Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Senate Finance Committee to Investigate Opportunity Zones

Senator Wyden, chair of the Senate Finance Committee, announced recently that the committee would begin an investigation into Opportunity Zones. The announcement begins:

"Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden, D-Ore., today launched an investigation into the Opportunity Zone Program and whether it has delivered on Republican promises to create jobs and drive investment in low-income communities, rather than just create a loophole for wealthy investors to avoid paying taxes.

In letters to SkyBridge CapitalBaker Tilly US, LLPCresset Partners, LLCHatteras SkyPTM Partners, LLCRelated GroupShopoff Realty Investments, Wyden wrote, “I have long been concerned that the Opportunity Zone program may permit wealthy investors another opportunity to avoid billions of dollars in taxes without meaningfully benefitting the distressed communities the program was intended to help. A report released by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) heightened my concern about the effects of the Opportunity Zone program. The GAO report notes that representatives of several Opportunity Funds indicated that they would have proceeded with projects in what are now designated zones without the tax incentives provided by the Opportunity Zone program…Currently, there are no safeguards or transparency measures in place to ensure taxpayers are not simply subsidizing high-end real estate investments by billionaires without demonstrating the benefit they are providing to low income-communities they claim to help.”

January 18, 2022 in Current Affairs, Federal – Legislative, In the News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 17, 2022

New Article: Who’s Afraid of Bob Jones?: 'Fundamental National Public Policy' and Critical Race Theory in a Delicate Democracy

Professor Lynn Lu has a new interesting article forthcoming in CUNY L. Rev.  looking at the broader impact of Bob Jones all these years later entitled Who's Afraid of Bob Jones?: 'Fundamental National Policy' and Critical Race theory in a Delicate Democracy. Here is the abstract:

In Summer of 2021, Republican legislators across the United States introduced a host of bills to prohibit government funding for schools or agencies that teach critical race theory (“CRT”), described by the American Association of Law Schools not as a single doctrine but a set of “frameworks” to “explain and illustrate how structural racism produces racial inequity within our social, economic, political, legal, and educational systems[,] even absent individual racist intent.” Characterizing such an explicitly race-conscious analysis of legal and social institutions as “divisive,” opponents of CRT, such as former Vice President Mike Pence, labeled it “nothing short of state-sponsored and state-sanctioned racism.”

The political campaign to “Stop CRT,” as articulated by strategist Christopher Rufo, seeks to redirect the time-honored civil-rights strategy of defunding racially discriminatory social institutions for use against race-conscious efforts to remedy the ongoing disparate racial, economic, and other social effects perpetuated by the same institutions. The movement to Stop CRT thus seeks to freeze civil rights progress where it stood decades ago, as when the Supreme Court acknowledged a “fundamental national public policy” against racial segregation in its 1983 decision in the notorious case of Bob Jones University v. United States, while leaving unresolved vital questions about whether and how to allocate public resources affirmatively to foster diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility in democratic society.

In Bob Jones, the Court upheld the federal taxation of private schools that excluded Black students because their religious beliefs allegedly mandated “racial separation.” Specifically, the Court ruled that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) properly withheld federal tax-exempt status to otherwise qualifying entities to enforce “fundamental national public policy” (“FNPP”), as expressed by all three branches of the federal government, against racial segregation in schools, and deemed desegregation a compelling government interest that outweighed any burden on religion. As a private tax dispute, Bob Jones stands alongside legions of other complaints brought by taxpayers aggrieved by IRS actions. But as a case involving an educational institution raising a religious liberty claim against antidiscrimination regulation, Bob Jones raised broader public law issues involving constitutional and federal statutory interpretation, as well as judicial review of administrative action.

This article assesses the legal and symbolic influence of Bob Jones not to relitigate the case or to rewrite history, but to highlight the case’s lasting symbolic impact and lessons for future civil rights advocacy, especially as informed by CRTs that developed alongside the federal courts’ retreat from enforcing existing antidiscrimination norms. Part I examines the case of Bob Jones to show how its political and legal context shaped its unique posture and path to the Supreme Court. Part II examines the afterlife of Bob Jones and its symbolic importance to conservatives motivated to prevent its expansion, even as the decision limits its own impact by leaving crucial substantive questions unresolved: namely, the role of pluralism in enforcing civil rights against First Amendment claims, the viability of race-conscious remedies for racial discrimination, and the visibility of redistributive economic justice concerns. Finally, Part III shows how CRT’s insistence on confronting those same questions reveals persistent inequities sustained by U.S. social and legal institutions, drawing the fire of efforts to Stop CRT. Part III assesses the prospects for moving the difficult questions left unresolved in Bob Jones back to the center of analysis, even with the current Supreme Court in a polarized and partisan political climate. The Article ultimately concludes that the legal reorientation demanded by Bob Jones and initiated by critical theorists, whatever their fate in the Court’s jurisprudence in the near term, remains crucial for identifying and challenging ongoing power disparities in and through every level of democratic government and society.

Philip Hackney

January 17, 2022 in Federal – Executive, Federal – Judicial, Federal – Legislative, Publications – Articles | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 9, 2021

IRS Issues Action on Decision in Mayo

In November, the IRS issued an Action on Decision in the case of Mayo Clinic v. United States, 997 F.3d 789 (8th Cir. 2021),
rev’g, 412 F.Supp.3d 1038 (D. Minn. 2019). They will follow the precedent in the 8th Circuit, but refuse to accept the interpretation of the 8th Circuit reading out the Treasury regulation requiring formal instruction to be a primary function of an educational organization under section 170(b)(1)(a)(ii). I previously wrote about this case here.

It involves whether Mayo Clinic may use an exception to the unrelated business income tax provided to educational organizations under section 514(c)(9)(C)(i). Mayo Clinic claims to be "an educational organization which normally maintains a regular faculty and curriculum and normally has a regularly enrolled body of pupils or students in attendance at the place where its educational activities are regularly carried on." The IRS, relying upon Treasury regulations, that require that an educational organization must have as "its primary function . . . the presentation of formal instruction," did not allow Mayo the exception.

The district court held that the primary function test was not a legitimate interpretation of the statute. While the Appeals court disagreed in part, it held that the IRS was wrong in its application of a primary function test. It remanded the case to the district court with instructions to ensure that Mayo Clinic primarily promotes education. 

I expressed concern regarding the case because I think it provides an easy path to public charity status for any organization that is primarily educational by normally having 1 faculty and some students. I did not expect the IRS to appeal, but thought they may choose to fight the case in other circuits. They have expressly taken this latter path.

In supporting its reasons the IRS stated: "We disagree with the Eighth Circuit’s invalidation of the long-standing regulatory requirement that the primary function of an educational organization described in section 170(b)(1)(A)(ii) must be formal instruction (the formal instruction requirement). First, in concluding that the formal instruction requirement “has no long history of congressional acceptance,” the Eighth Circuit did not consider the numerous times Congress has amended section 170(b), increasing the percentage of the allowable deduction and adding to the categories of organizations eligible for the preferential allowable deduction, since the regulations under section 170(b)(1)(A)(ii) were published in 1958, which is persuasive evidence of Congressional acceptance of such regulations. See, e.g., CFTC v. Schor, 478 U.S. 833, 846 (1986) (“It is well established that when Congress revisits a statute giving rise to a longstanding administrative interpretation without pertinent change, the ‘congressional failure to revise or repeal the agency’s interpretation is persuasive evidence that the interpretation is the one intended by Congress.’”). Second, the Eighth Circuit did not consider that the faculty-curriculum student-place requirement provides a statutory basis for the formal instruction requirement in the regulations. Finally, the Eighth Circuit did not consider the Government’s arguments regarding over one dozen Code sections cross-referencing section 170(b)(1)(A)(ii) (many of which predated the regulation’s 1958 publication), which further support the position that the purpose of the formal instruction requirement is to ensure that section 170(b)(1)(A)(ii) “could not reach very far, if at all, beyond schools, colleges, and universities in its coverage.” Brundage v. Commissioner, 54 T.C. 1468, 1474 (1970)."

Philip Hackney

December 9, 2021 in Federal – Executive, Federal – Judicial, Federal – Legislative | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Religious Organizations Prepare for 'Potential Onslaught' of Evictions

Writing for today's edition of Religion News Service (RNS) news, Kathryn Post states that the Supreme Court’s August 26 decision to end the federal eviction moratorium brings new challenges for religious leaders and organizations working to aid those at risk for homelessness. Post cites to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau indicating that more than 3.6 million Americans say they could face eviction in the next two months.

This startling statistic has brought the following response from Sarah Abramson, vice president of strategy and impact at Combined Jewish Philanthropies in Boston: "We’re very, very nervous. There is already a tremendous housing shortage in Boston. And we know from our data, and from the experience of our partners who do this work, just how difficult it was for somebody who has been evicted in the past to get housing.”

Jerrel T. Gilliam, executive director of Light of Life Rescue Mission in Pittsburgh, also shared concerns: “We are going to need to be very creative, and to think outside the box in order to prepare for what could be a potential onslaught of people needing assistance in a short amount of time.” 

In its August 26 decision, the Court ruled that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lacked the authority to establish a federal eviction moratorium. According to the Court, such a moratorium requires congressional approval. The decision comes as renters and landlords face a backlog of promised funds. According to Census Bureau data, the government has thus far distributed only about $5.1 billion of the $46.5 billion in federal rental assistance funds intended to prevent eviction.

“We definitely have to work hard to make sure that money reaches people,” said Shams DaBaron, a New York activist who also goes by “Da Homeless Hero.” “We have to cover both sides: these small landlords that need it, and those who are extremely poor.”

DaBaron is currently living in an apartment with the support of a voucher program, but he says the city is behind on three months of rent. An eviction moratorium is one measure that can help buy more time while such funds face bureaucratic delays.

DaBaron gained national attention as unofficial spokesperson for the residents of the Lucerne, a hotel-turned-shelter during the pandemic in Manhattan’s Upper West Side that became the center of New York’s “homeless hotel” debate. When he was not advocating for his fellow residents, DaBaron partnered with local group Open Hearts to develop a program called Soulful Walk and Talks. The program provided hotel shelter residents the opportunity to walk to the nearby Riverside Park with local faith leaders from a range of religious traditions who provided a safe space for spiritual reflection.

“We didn’t want to make it a religious thing, but we understand the value of spirit, of soul, of that deep essence within everybody,” said DaBaron. “One of the things that came out of it, from talking to many of the faith leaders, is that many of them were transformed, just as many of us were transformed.”

“It was definitely very impactful,” said Rabbi Lauren Herrmann of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, who joined in the Walk and Talks and organized other clergy participants. “For one thing, I really understood for the first time in my life the issues surrounding the shelter system, and why people choose to be on the streets instead of being in shelters. … The shelter system is deeply broken, and some of the stories I heard were deeply upsetting.”

Herrmann and DaBaron see the Soulful Walk and Talks as tending to the essential spiritual needs of those facing homelessness. They hope to continue and expand the program as the federal eviction moratorium lifts. Yet, DaBaron and Herrmann also pointed to structural changes that need to take place. New York state implemented a new eviction moratorium on Sept. 1 that extends until January 2022. However, the moratorium does not address the city’s lack of affordable housing, the income cliffs that foster dependence on government programs and the health and safety risks facing those in congregate shelters, where many former Lucerne residents are finding themselves since the hotel shelter closed this summer.

In Pittsburgh, Light of Life Rescue Mission takes a multifaceted approach to homelessness by providing a range of services including case management, education, unemployment services and accommodations for those facing housing insecurity.

Gilliam, the Christian organization’s executive director, is concerned the end of the eviction moratorium will mean a sudden, sharp increase in the number of residents facing evictions. At one point during the pandemic, evictions in Pittsburgh slowed to a complete halt — in a typical year, according to Gilliam, Pittsburgh sees 14,000 evictions.

Gilliam suggested implementing preventive measures that would allow landlords to receive rent payments while enabling those at risk for evictions to find suitable housing.

“We’re pleading with everyone,” said Gilliam. “Let’s try to get people help while they’re still in the home and help the landlord have another month or two of rent, so that we can find a place for them without them having to pass through homelessness to get assistance.”

The pandemic has not been as kind to all religious organizations working to serve those facing housing insecurity. Chaplain Asma Inge-Hanif, founder and executive director of Muslimat Al Nisaa, has been serving the Baltimore community for 30 years. The organization provides health, education and social services to all, regardless of their ability to pay, and its Home Shelter is especially designed to meet the needs of Muslim women. She says her organization has served thousands of people over the years.

In the last year and a half, Inge-Hanif almost died from COVID-19 and lost her organization’s signature location. “I couldn’t pay the rent anymore, even though they claim there was an eviction moratorium,” she said. Now, Inge-Hanif is working to keep the shelter open on a small scale so she can help meet housing needs, especially those of people arriving from Afghanistan.

“I’m getting so many requests all the time from people who are getting evicted,” she said. “It’s often people who have no status and people of color. Everyday I get seven to 10 requests for shelter and housing. And I can’t help them.”

As the federal eviction moratorium ends, Inge-Hanif is hoping to raise money for an apartment building so she can house more people. She also says governments need to make rental assistance and other services more accessible.

“That’s why people are being evicted. They can’t get through the paperwork,” said Inge-Hanif. “The people who need the help are not in a position to maneuver through all the red tape. … The way the system is set up prevents the people who are most in need from actualizing success and being self-sufficient.”

That, indeed, appears to be the sad truth.

Prof. Vaughn E. James, Texas Tech University School of Law

September 9, 2021 in Church and State, Current Affairs, Federal – Judicial, Federal – Legislative, In the News, Religion | Permalink | Comments (0)