Wednesday, September 1, 2021

First Effects of the AFPF Donor Disclosure Decision and Additional Analysis

UntitledUPDATE: A reader commented that 1st Circuit has cited but distinguished the AFPF decision in rejecting a constitutional challenge to certain Rhode Island disclosure and disclaimer laws applicable to election-related communications, possibly setting the stage for the Supreme Court to consider the AFPF decision's applicable to campaign finance disclosure laws. See Gaspee Project v. Mederos (1st Circ. Sept., 14, 2021). In contrast, a federal district court in Colorado has relied in part on the AFPF decision in enjoining a municipal independent expenditures disclosure law. See Lakewood Citizens Watchdog Group v. City of Lakewood (D. Colo. Sept. 7, 2021).  And finally, the Hawaii Attorney General has posted the following notice on its Tax & Charities website: "Effective immediately, the State of Hawaii Department of the Attorney General’s Tax & Charities Division will no longer require the filing of Schedule B to the IRS Form 990 as part of the registration and annual reporting requirements."

 

The first effects of the Supreme Court's decision in Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta are now being felt, although it will take years for the full effects of this landmark donor disclosure case to be realized. 

Not surprisingly, California quickly posted the following notice on its Charities webpage in recognition of its loss:

Effective July 1, 2021, the Registry of Charitable Trusts will no longer require the filing of Schedule B to the IRS Form 990 as part of the registration and annual reporting requirements.

New Jersey, which has a filing requirement similar to California's, announced it would not be enforcing its requirement on its Charities Registration Section webpage, saying:

In light of the United States Supreme Court’s recent decision in Americans for Prosperity v. Bonta, the Division's Charities Registration Section has determined that the requirement that charities submit the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Form 990 Schedule B upfront as part of their initial and yearly registrations can no longer be enforced. The Division will therefore be revising its rules, and in the interim will not be taking enforcement action based on the failure to include Schedule B or an equivalent donor schedule in such registrations. The Division will deem any entities that were previously deemed non-compliant solely because they failed to submit Schedule B or an equivalent donor schedule to be in compliance with registration requirements. All other regulations at N.J.A.C. 13:48-1.1 et seq. remain in effect and the Division continues to require the submission of all other schedules and statements.

And as already noted in this space, New York has also suspended collection of that schedule pending review of the decision. Both New York and New Jersey faced legal challenges from the Liberty Justice Center to their collection of the schedule, which may have pushed them to get these notices out quickly. No word yet on whether Hawaii, which is the other state with a similar requirement, will follow their lead. (Ballotpedia also identifies Kentucky as having such a requirement, but filings in the AFPF litigation indicate this is not accurate.) Coverage: The NonProfit Times.

For recent, in-depth analysis of the possible further effects of the decision, see Americans for Prosperity Foundation v. Bonta: Questions and Answers, written by Professor Bradley A. Smith (Capital University) for the Institute for Free Speech. One interesting aspect of his analysis is his take on the possible effect on the federal tax law donor disclosure requirement (operationalized through Schedule B) (footnotes omitted):

Does This Mean Nonprofits No Longer Have to File Schedule B With the IRS?

No. In 2020, the IRS repealed the requirement that donor names and addresses be reported on Schedule B for most nonprofits, but not for those operating under Sections 501(c)(3) or 527 of the Internal Revenue Code. The AFPF majority specifically noted that, “revenue collection efforts and conferral of tax-exempt status may raise issues not presented by California’s disclosure requirement.”

It is hard to say how the courts would respond to a challenge to the IRS’s Schedule B filing requirement. Such a challenge would now be analyzed under the AFPF framework, meaning the IRS would have to show an important need for the information and that the demand was narrowly tailored. However, as 501(c)(3) donors claim a tax deduction, the IRS would likely argue that the information is needed to ensure tax compliance – i.e., that the donations claimed by individual filers are actually received by charities. Given the potential revenue consequences, and a more direct connection between the information sought and the potential fraud than existed under California’s policy, courts might still uphold the rule, as the majority appears to suggest.

As often happens with Supreme Court decisions announcing new or clarified standards of review, how lower courts interpret the case going forward will be almost as important as the case itself.

Lloyd Mayer

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/nonprofit/2021/09/first-effects-of-the-afpf-donor-disclosure-decision-and-additional-analysis.html

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Comments

Gaspee Project v Mederos, a recent first circuit decision, may be the first case interpreting Bonta. It upheld Rhode Island's disclosure and disclaimer provisions. A cert petition will be forthcoming. The disclaimer part of the ruling ignores many controlling opinions, and relies on inapplicable cases.

Posted by: robbin stewart | Sep 21, 2021 1:21:31 PM

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