Tuesday, June 22, 2021

Reporting Racism in Private Schools to the IRS

Tax-exempt private schools are required to have and to publish a racially nondiscriminatory policy.  In 2019, the IRS released Rev. Proc. 2019-22, which allows private schools to use their Internet websites to publicize such policies, a requirement for exemption under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  By way of background, Rev. Proc. 75-50 outlines the guidelines and recordkeeping requirements for determining whether a private school has a racially nondiscriminatory policy and in fact operates in accordance with such policy.  Rev. Proc. 75-50 applies to private schools that are applying for tax-exemption and to private schools that already are tax-exempt.

Specifically, Rev. Proc. 75-50 requires, inter alia, a private school to include a statement acknowledging it has a racially nondiscriminatory policy  “and therefore does not discriminate against applicants and students on the basis of race, color, and national or ethnic origin.”  The statement must be included in one of the listed governing documents and in its brochures, catalogues, and other written ads for prospective students.  Moreover, the school must make the policy “known to all segments of the general community served by the school.”  Newspaper circulation and certain broadcast media are listed as acceptable means of doing so.

Rev. Proc. 2019-22 modified Rev. Proc. 75-50 by naming a third means of making a racially nondiscriminatory policy known in the manner prescribed: the school’s Internet homepage.  Generally, the policy must be displayed on the school’s publicly accessible Internet homepage throughout the taxable year. Rev. Proc. 2019-22 even sets forth a sample notice for a private school’s homepage:

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS

The M school admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.

There are also enumerated factors used to determine whether the notice is “reasonably expected to be noticed” by homepage viewers, such as the size, color, and graphics used; whether the notice is unavoidable, etc.

Form 1023 is used to apply for tax-exemption under section 501(c)(3).  Schedule B pertains to Schools, Colleges, and Universities.  On Form 1023, there are a number of questions concerning the requirement of a racially nondiscriminatory policy for private schools.  Moreover, private schools applying for tax-exemption are informed that they will need to file an annual certification regarding their policy.  (Interestingly, there are also a number of questions under Schedule B that deal with racial discrimination, including whether the private school was established to subvert integration and the racial composition of the student body, faculty, and administrative staff).

Generally, tax-exempt organizations, including numerous private schools, must file an annual reporting return (Form 990 or 990-EZ).  The return includes a question allowing private schools to satisfy the aforementioned annual certification requirement.  Many of the other questions permit a private school to self-report and answer “yes” or “no” in regard to whether it maintains records regarding racial composition, engages in discriminatory practices in terms of admission policies and scholarships, etc. This comes as no surprise since our tax system is based largely on self-reporting.  However, self-reporting depends on the overall honesty of taxpayers.  Every year a tax student asks the inevitable question midway through the material on gross income (or sometimes earlier during the Cesarini/treasure trove lecture):  How would anyone ever know?  I respond by saying that I am there to teach them what the law says and how to abide by the law, and then I remind them that God will know.  Many students who are facing or who have faced racial discrimination at private schools undoubtedly ask whether anyone will ever know about the systemic challenges they face in applying or almost daily while engaging in the necessary and noble pursuit of acquiring an education. 

Perhaps one way the IRS could gain valuable insight into the true encounters of racial discrimination is to require private schools also to publish on their Internet homepages a number or a link to a nonprofit organization that would report such incidents to the IRS once a threshold number was reached.  If amendable, the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) could serve in this role as it has already publicly announced that it plans to release initiatives to stop systemic racism.  See NAIS Statement on Addressing Anti-Blackness and Systemic Racism.

 

Khrista McCarden

Hoffman Fuller Professor Tax Law

Tulane Law School

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/nonprofit/2021/06/reporting-racism-in-private-schools-to-the-irs.html

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