Friday, December 11, 2020

CA Counters US Call for SCOTUS to Grant Cert in CA Sched B Disclosure Case

In Americans For Prosperity Foundation v. Becerra, California recently filed a Supplemental Brief countering the US brief in the case, which argued that while the US Schedule B requiring donor disclosure of charitable organizations was constitutional, the California version was unconstitutional:

"1. The United States principally contends that the court of appeals applied the wrong standard of scrutiny. U.S. Br. 8-19. But it is difficult to see any material difference between the standard embraced by the United States and the one applied below. According to the United States, “compelled disclosures that carry a reasonable probability of harassment, reprisals, and similar harms are subject to exacting scrutiny.” Id. at7. Exacting scrutiny, in turn, calls for “a form of narrow tailoring” (id.) that requires “‘the strength of the governmental interest [to] reflect the seriousness of the actual burden on First Amendment rights’” (id. at 9); that dem ands a means-ends fit that is “‘reasonable’” but not “‘perfect’” (id. at 16); and that ensures that the compelled disclosure does “not sweep significantly more broadly than necessary to achieve [a] substantial governmental interest” (id. at 12). See also id. at 9 (compelled disclosure requirements are valid where “the public interest in disclosure outweighs the harm”) (internal quotation marks and ellipses omitted). The United States also asserts that “narrow tailoring is to  some degree implicit in the requirement that the governmental interest in the compelled disclosure be ‘legitimate and substantial’” because “it is difficult to demonstrate a ‘substantial’ interest in a broad disclosure scheme when narrower disclosures would be sufficient.” Id. at 10-11.

The court of appeals held that California’s Schedule B filing requirement is subject to “‘exacting scrutiny,’” and it understood exacting scrutiny in the same way as the United States. Pet. App. 15a.1 It recognized that the “strength of the governmental interest must reflect the seriousness of the actual burden on First Amendment rights.” Id. (internal quotation marks omitted). It examined whether the State’s chosen approach swept too broadly. See id. at 19a-23a, 29a. And it determined that concerns about overly broad regulation are part and parcel of the substantial-relationship test. See id. at 15a-16a (requirement “that the State employ means ‘narrowly drawn’ to  avoid needlessly stifling expressive association” is not “distinguishable from the ordinary ‘substantial relation’ standard”).

The United States ignores the overlap between the court of appeals’ approach and its own and asserts that the lower court erred in declining to require an adequate means-ends fit. U.S. Br. 16. But what the court of appeals declined to adopt was “the kind of ‘narrow tailoring’ traditionally required in the context of strict scrutiny,” including the requirement that “the state . . . choose the least restrictive means of accomplishing its purposes.” Pet. App. 16a; see also Opp. 6, 14-15. And the United States itself agrees that strict scrutiny and its “particularly stringent form of narrow tailoring” do not apply to information-reporting requirements like the one at issue here. See U.S. Br. 16."

Philip Hackney

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/nonprofit/2020/12/ca-counters-us-call-for-scotus-to-grant-cert-in-ca-sched-b-disclosure-case.html

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