Tuesday, June 2, 2015

China's "Foreign NGO Management Law" Continues to Spark Criticism

China's draft "Foreign NGO Management Law" continues to spark criticism that it is actually an effort to silence criticism of the central government.  The Wall Street Journal has run two recent articles, one of which states:

A Chinese draft law treats the entire sector of foreign nonprofits as potential enemies of the state, placing them under the management of the Ministry of Public Security.  To drive home the point, the law is being readied as part of a package of legislation that also includes a national-security law and an anti-terrorism law—and it contains similar language, according to Western legal experts who have studied the texts . . . Undoubtedly, the undercover operations of a few politically motivated nonprofits in China have complicated life for the vast majority offering philanthropic assistance.  Foreign nonprofits are widely viewed as a bridgehead for subversion. Intensely suspicious of any networked activity it doesn’t directly control, the government is especially wary of the grants they scatter that have allowed the domestic NGO sector to flourish. In a preamble, the draft law says its aim is to protect the “rights and interests” of foreign NGOs while “promoting exchange and cooperation.” But it piles on new layers of bureaucracy. Nonprofits will have to pay tax and hire Chinese accountants to conduct regular audits. They will have to go through approved agencies to hire staff and recruit volunteers. To enforce compliance, police will have unchallenged rights to enter offices, seize documents and inspect bank accounts.

The International Center for Not for Profit has a very use primer on Chinese NGO laws.  

dkj

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/nonprofit/2015/06/chinas-foreign-ngo-management-law-continues-to-spark-criticism.html

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