Media Law Prof Blog

Editor: Christine A. Corcos
Louisiana State Univ.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Xenos @dimitris_xenos on the Guardian's Publications of Snowden Files: Assessing the Standards of Freedom of Speech in the Context of State Secrets & Mass Surveillance

Dimitris Xenos, University of East London, has published The Guardian's Publications of Snowden Files: Assessing the Standards of Freedom of Speech in the Context of State Secrets and Mass Surveillance at Information & Communications Technology Law DOI: 10.1080/13600834.2016.1203507. Here is the abstract.

The unprecedented pressure that has been exerted on The Guardian by UK authorities for disclosing state secrets about mass surveillance programmes of security and intelligence services and the instrumental involvement of large high-tech corporations has legal and practical consequences. On one hand, it endangers freedom of speech that characterises and sustains democracy at domestic level and, on the other, it reinforces cross-jurisdictional tactics of media organisations and uncontrolled disclosures on the internet, where the danger of manipulation of national state secrets is considerable. The legal problem involved lies in a judicial deviation from the entrenched standards of constitutional review, forcing an exclusive focus on the alleged damage that is caused by media publications. To secure a healthy political and public debate domestically and avoid unwarranted disclosures and manipulation of national state secrets in foreign media and digital markets, the importance of the public interest issue that is disclosed by domestic media must be evaluated, and safeguarded accordingly by a higher level of protection of freedom of speech in constitutional review.

The full text is not available for download.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/media_law_prof_blog/2016/07/xenos-dimitris_xenos-on-the-guardians-publications-of-snowden-files-assessing-the-standards-of-freed.html

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