Saturday, October 8, 2022

Luke Meier on Achieving True Strict Product Liability (But Nor for Plaintiffs with Fault)

Luke Meier, Professor of Law at Baylor Law School, has posted to SSRN his manuscript, Achieving True Strict Product Liability (But Not for Plaintiffs with Fault).  Here is the abstract:

Under modern tort law, the strict product liability cause of action does not impose true strict liability. This Article suggests that this development can be traced to an analytical difficulty: How to prevent a plaintiff with fault from being able to take advantage of the strict liability standard? Courts have not developed a satisfactory doctrine that both imposes true strict product liability on manufacturers while simultaneously preventing plaintiffs with fault from recovery on this claim. In the absence of a better idea, courts have (mostly) retreated from a true strict product liability standard. This Article offers a solution to this analytical riddle: A simple change to the current comparative fault jury instructions would allow jurisdictions to impose strict product liability on manufacturers while simultaneously preventing plaintiffs with fault from recovering on a strict product liability claim. This is all that is necessary for jurisdictions that are inclined to put the “strict” back in the strict product liability cause of action.

October 8, 2022 in Mass Tort Scholarship, Products Liability | Permalink | Comments (0)