Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Reminder: Nominations for the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education

Here's a reminder that nominations are sought for the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education. Nominations are due on March 21, 2016 (at 11:59 p.m. EDT).

The Burton Awards for Legal Achievement promote and publicize the importance of writing in the legal profession. The Awards, which recognize lawyers and law students whose work exemplifies the goals of our field, were founded in 1999 by William Burton, author of Burton's Legal Thesaurus and recipient of LWI's 2010 Golden Pen Award. More information about the awards is available by clicking here.

For fifteen years, the Burton Awards have included a category--the award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education--that emphasizes the vital role that educators play in improving legal writing throughout our nation's legal system. The award is given annually during a black-tie gala at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. to an individual or group that has made an outstanding contribution to the education of lawyers in the field of legal analysis, research, and writing, whether through teaching, program design, program support, innovative thinking, or writing. We consider an array of achievements, including significant acts in a given year or the accumulated work of a career.

Previous recipients of the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education are:

  • Dean Kent Syverud of Vanderbilt
  • Dean Darby Dickerson of Texas Tech (previously at Stetson)
  • Professor Ralph Brill of Chicago-Kent
  • Professor Laurel Oates of Seattle University
  • Professor Mary Beth Beazley of The Ohio State University
  • Professor Richard Neumann of Hofstra
  • Professor Helene Shapo of Northwestern University
  • Professor Marjorie Rombauer of the University of Washington
  • Professor Tina Stark of Boston University
  • Professor Mary Lawrence of the University of Oregon School of Law
  • Professor Anne Enquist of Seattle University
  • Professor Marilyn Walter of Brooklyn Law School

The Burton Awards are an excellent forum to publicize the achievements of those in our field. The award committee asks that you nominate deserving individuals or groups for the Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education Award. Nominations should describe the contributions of the nominee and should be sent to one or more of the following members of the selection committee by e-mail by March 21, 2016.

  • Noah Messing (noah.messing@yale.edu)
  • Grace Tonner (gtonner@law.uci.edu); or
  • Nancy Schultz (nschultz@chapman.edu).

Hat tip to Noah A. Messing at Yale Law School.

(mew)

March 16, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Nominations Sought for the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education

Nominations are sought for the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education. Nominations are due on March 21, 2016 (at 11:59 p.m. EDT).

The Burton Awards for Legal Achievement promote and publicize the importance of writing in the legal profession. The Awards, which recognize lawyers and law students whose work exemplifies the goals of our field, were founded in 1999 by William Burton, author of Burton's Legal Thesaurus and recipient of LWI's 2010 Golden Pen Award. More information about the awards is available by clicking here.

For fifteen years, the Burton Awards have included a category--the award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education--that emphasizes the vital role that educators play in improving legal writing throughout our nation's legal system. The award is given annually during a black-tie gala at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. to an individual or group that has made an outstanding contribution to the education of lawyers in the field of legal analysis, research, and writing, whether through teaching, program design, program support, innovative thinking, or writing. We consider an array of achievements, including significant acts in a given year or the accumulated work of a career.

Previous recipients of the Burton Award for Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education are:

  • Dean Kent Syverud of Vanderbilt
  • Dean Darby Dickerson of Texas Tech (previously at Stetson)
  • Professor Ralph Brill of Chicago-Kent
  • Professor Laurel Oates of Seattle University
  • Professor Mary Beth Beazley of The Ohio State University
  • Professor Richard Neumann of Hofstra
  • Professor Helene Shapo of Northwestern University
  • Professor Marjorie Rombauer of the University of Washington
  • Professor Tina Stark of Boston University
  • Professor Mary Lawrence of the University of Oregon School of Law
  • Professor Anne Enquist of Seattle University
  • Professor Marilyn Walter of Brooklyn Law School

The Burton Awards are an excellent forum to publicize the achievements of those in our field. The award committee asks that you nominate deserving individuals or groups for the Outstanding Contributions to Legal Writing Education Award. Nominations should describe the contributions of the nominee and should be sent to one or more of the following members of the selection committee by e-mail by March 21, 2016.

  • Noah Messing (noah.messing@yale.edu)
  • Grace Tonner (gtonner@law.uci.edu); or
  • Nancy Schultz (nschultz@chapman.edu).

Hat tip to Noah A. Messing at Yale Law School.

(mew)

March 10, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Illinois Supreme Court Gives Brief Writers an Option: Number of Pages or Number of Words

The Illinois Supreme Court recently amended Rule 341, changing fundamentally how Illinois lawyers will write their briefs and reply briefs. Under the new rule that became effective in January, lawyers will have the option of writing briefs of up to 50 pages or 15,000 words, and reply briefs of 20 pages or 7,000 words.

Here's the amended rule:

Illinois Supreme Court Rule 341(b) Length of Briefs.

      (1) Page Length Limitation. The brief of appellant and brief of appellee shall each be limited to 50 pages, and the reply brief to 20 pages. Alternatively, the brief of appellant and brief of appellee shall each be limited to no more than 15,000 words, and the reply brief to 7,000 words. This page length limitation excludes pages containing and words contained in the Rule 341(d) cover, the Rule 341(h)(1) statement of points and authorities, the Rule 341(c) certificate of compliance, the certificate of service, and those matters to be appended to the brief under Rule 342(a). Cross-appellants and cross-appellees shall each be allowed an additional 30 pages, or alternatively 8,400 words, and the cross-appellant’s reply brief shall not exceed 20 pages, or alternatively 7,000 words.

See also Jonathan Amarilio, Why One Seemingly Minor Change Will Transform the Way We Write, Chicago Bar Ass'n Record, Jan. 2016, at 32.

(mew)

March 9, 2016 | Permalink | Comments (0)