Wednesday, February 10, 2010

Professionalism alert: How not to write to a potential employer.

Many of you may remember this law student-employer email dust-up from a few years back that traveled the globe and back, serving as a warning about how private emails can go viral as well as a lesson in how not to talk to an employer. 

It's happened again. This time it involves a still unidentified 3L and an IT consultant who mistakenly received the student's resume.  We'll let Above the Law's Elie Mystal take it from there:

The situation started innocently enough. The unidentified 3L sent in a résumé and cover letter to Webster & Associates LLC, looking for legal work. The letter was inartfully addressed to “Esteemed Mr. Webster, Partner:”

The problem is that Webster & Associates is not a law firm; it’s a company run by a man named Bruce Webster that specializes in IT consulting. Two seconds on the Webster & Associates website would have revealed this fact.

Webster sent the job seeker back an — admittedly curt — response. And then things got out of hand.

You can read about the denouement here.

Hat tip to the online ABA Journal and ATL.

I am the scholarship dude.

(jbl)

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/legalwriting/2010/02/professionalism-alert-how-not-to-write-to-a-potential-employer.html

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