Monday, September 21, 2020

Shira Perlmutter Selected as Next Registrar of Copyrights

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden has announced her selection of Shira Perlmutter as the 14th Register of Copyrights. Click here for more information on the appointment.

(mew)

September 21, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 20, 2020

Yale Law Journal Deadline for Articles and Essays is Wednesday

The Yale Law Journal is accepting articles and essays for its next volume until Wednesday, September 23, 2020.

Click here for more information.

(mew)

September 20, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Tips on Keeping Current

Michael Goldblatt has some tips for attorneys on how to keep current with legal developments. Have a look at this post on his Law Practice Tips Blog.

(mew)

September 19, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Justice Ginsburg

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a great legal writer. In 2009, she received a Lifetime Achievement Award from Scribes--The American Society of Legal Writers. Here is a link to the transcript of Justice Ginsburg's conversation with Bryan Garner, as published in the Scribes Journal of Legal Writing.

(mew)

September 19, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Reminder & Extended Deadline - JLWI Call for Essays & Book Reviews

The Journal of the Legal Writing Institute has extended the deadline for Essay and Book Review Submissions to Monday October 19, 2020. More information below!

Screen Shot 2020-09-01 at 9.01.33 AM

The Journal of the Legal Writing Institute invites essay and book review submissions around the theme of “Disruption” to be considered for publication in Volume 25 of JLWI.  We anticipate publishing Volume 25 in March 2021. 

In these times, we invite writers to think about the topic broadly, considering the following questions, among others:

* How has COVID-19 and/or the civil unrest surrounding police brutality disrupted or changed your approach to teaching?  Your course goals?  Your scholarship?

* Do you find yourself thinking differently about interactions with students and colleagues as you learn from these disruptions?

* Are these disruptions good or bad and why?     

Call for Essays:

We invite essays addressing the topic outlined above. Essays about online teaching methods are discouraged. Much has already been written on the subject and more will be written by the time Volume 25 is published.  Rather, we are looking for essays related to the long-term effects these major societal disruptions have had on your approach to legal writing and your future teaching and scholarship.

Essays should continue the Journal’s mission, which is to provide a forum for the publication of scholarly works on the theory, substance, and pedagogy of legal writing. Essays may be scholarly either because they fully prove a thesis with relevant support or because they are part of a larger, coordinated section of related essays that build on each other toward a shared thesis. Essays should not feel like an underdeveloped article. The form an author chooses — essay or article — should be driven by the thesis and its necessary proof.   An essay is typically shorter than an article and may be less formal and more personal. It may focus on an unusual experience in, or insight into, the field or careful analysis of a new topic. An essay often demonstrates a deft hand with humor or a lovely way with words.

We envision essays ranging in length from 500 to 3,000 words, but the Board will consider essays of any length.  To read essays we printed in Volume 24, please visit http://www.legalwritingjournal.org/volume-24/. Please submit essays for consideration by email no later than Monday, October 19, 2020, to the Journal’s Essay Editors, Brenda Tofte: bltofte@gmail.com and Irene Ten-Cate: itencate@central.uh.edu. Please email Brenda and/or Irene with any questions or concerns. We look forward to reviewing your submission.

Call for Book Reviews:

What have you been reading to better understand and grapple with current societal disruptions in the context of your teaching and/or scholarship?  Have you found any legal writing textbooks particularly responsive to current concerns? We encourage you to submit a book review on this topic, keeping in mind the Journal's mission, which is to provide a forum for the publication of scholarly works on the theory, substance, and pedagogy of legal writing.  

Book reviews typically run between 1,000 and 3,000 words.  To read book reviews we printed in Volume 24, please visit http://www.legalwritingjournal.org/volume-24/. The deadline for submitting a book review is Monday October 19, 2020.  

September 1, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 13, 2020

AALS Panel on "The Unequal Workplace"

Professor Deborah Borman organized and moderated an excellent panel presentation on The Unequal Workplace: Well Being at Stake, held earlier this year at the 2020 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools in Washington, D.C., on Thursday afternoon, January 2nd. The session was so-sponsored by the AALS Section on Balance in Legal Education and the Section on Teaching Methods. In addition to Professor Borman, the speakers included:

Renee N. Allen, St. John’s University School of Law
Cindy Galway Buys, Southern Illinois University School of Law
DeShun Harris, The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law
Alicia Jackson, Florida A&M University College of Law
Lucy Jewel, University of Tennessee College of Law
Nicholas A. Mirkay, III, University of Hawaii, William S. Richardson School of Law
Palma Joy Strand, Creighton University
Elaine Sylvester, Esq., Associate, Gunderson Dettmer LLP
Angela K. Upchurch, Southern Illinois University School of Law

The speakers provided ideas for addressing implicit bias, teaching cultural competency, developing cultural capital in marginalized groups, developing leadership skills to support and work with diverse persons in a variety of workplaces, and preparing students to recognize and successfully deal with instances of discrimination they may encounter in the legal profession.

(spl)

August 13, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

UNH Law is Hiring an Academic Dean

The University of New Hampshire Law School in Concord, New Hampshire, is looking for an academic dean. Click here for more information.

Hat tip to Amy Vorenberg.

(mew)

August 13, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

JALWD Announces Its New Editorial Board

The editorial board of Legal Communication & Rhetoric: JALWD announced its new editorial board members and editorial board members taking on new roles:
 
Aysha Ames (Brooklyn): Aysha joins LC&R as an Associate Editor. Before joining Brooklyn Law in 2018, Aysha served as an attorney for the United States Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights.
 
Maikieta Brantley (Denver): Maikieta joins LC&R as our Social Media Editor. Before joining the Lawyering Process Program at Denver Law in 2019, Maikieta did commercial and civil litigation work
 
Brad Desnoyer (Indiana): Brad previously served as an Associate Editor for LC&R and is now stepping into a Lead Editor role. Brad previously taught at the University of Missouri. Brad is the author of an exam-writing book published by West Academic, as well as co-author of an article on Race, Rhetoric, and Judicial Opinions.
 
Rachel Goldberg (Cornell): Rachel joins LC&R as an Associate Editor. Prior to joining Cornell, Rachel practiced appellate-level criminal defense at the Center for Appellate Litigation in New York City. She has a Ph.D. in English Language and Rhetoric from the University of Washington, where she also co-directed the Expository Writing Program.
 
Kristin Gerdy (BYU): Kristin has been an editor for LC&R since 2010 and now steps into a new role, Inter-Journal Liaison. She previously served as Editor-in-Chief and Assistant Editor-in-Chief of JLWI and has been a member of the ALWD and LWI Boards. She has authored numerous articles and essays on topics including the use of technology in the classroom and introducing first-year students to the "heart" of lawyering, and has a forthcoming article on literary references in the federal appellate courts.
 
Margaret Hannon (Michigan): Margaret previously served as an Associate and Lead Editor for LC&R and is now stepping into the co-Editor-in-Chief role. Margaret previously served as Managing Editor and Editor-in-Chief of LWI's Monograph Series, and is currently serving as Site Committee Host Liaison for ALWD's 2021 conference. Margaret co-authored an employment discrimination textbook and has contributed to Perspectives, the ABA's Before the Bar blog, and the Appellate Advocacy blog. She also volunteers as a cooperating attorney for the ACLU of Michigan.
 
Sherri Keene (Georgetown): Sherri previously served as an Associate Editor for LC&R and is now stepping into a Lead Editor role. Before joining Georgetown Law, Sherri served as the director of Maryland's legal writing program. Sherri was selected as a Distinguished Speaker by ALWD and organized Maryland Law Review's 2018 symposium on race and rhetoric. Sherri's most recent writing focuses on race and racial issues in criminal procedure.
 
Abby Pathoff (Chapman): Abby previously served as Social Media Editor for LC&R and is now stepping into an Associate Editor role. Before joining Chapman Law, Abby taught at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she was nominated for a teaching excellence award. Abby has written on the impact of fear-based narratives on law students.
 
Joe Regalia (UNLV): Joe joins LC&R as an Associate Editor. Before joining UNLV, Joe taught as an adjunct at Loyola Law (Chicago), John Marshall, and UNLV. He co-edits and writes for the Appellate Advocacy Blog and is the co-founder of Write.law and Pro Se Bootcamp.
 
Ruth Anne Robbins (Rutgers): Ruth Anne has served as co-Editor-in-Chief of LC&R since 2010 and is now transitioning into an Editor-in-Chief Emeritus role. She co-founded the Applied Legal Storytelling conference, served on the LWI Board and as LWI's president, and co-authors a 1L textbook about persuasive legal writing. Ruth Anne's writing focuses on applied legal storytelling and visual design in legal documents.
 
Kent Streseman (Santa Clara): Kent joins LC&R as an Associate Editor. Before joining Santa Clara, Kent served as a professor of appellate advocacy and director of the appellate advocacy program at Chicago-Kent College of Law, and as an assistant professor at Baylor Law. Kent was voted Chicago-Kent Professor of the Year five times by the school's Student Bar Association. Kent is a long-time member of LWI's Moot Court Committee and is a contributing editor for the Appellate Advocacy Blog.
 
Beth Wilensky (Michigan): Beth joins LC&R as a Lead Editor. Beth has previously served as a peer reviewer for LC&R, with which she has also published. She has also published articles with the Journal of Legal Education, Perspectives, Scribes, and the Second Draft. Beth's writing focuses on legal writing pedagogy, including collaborations with doctrinal faculty and incorporating live-client work and professionalism into the curriculum.
 
These new editors join an experienced and professional team of continuing editors:
JoAnne Sweeny (Louisville): co-Editor-in-Chief
Susan Bay (Marquette): co-Managing Editor
Jessica Wherry (Georgetown): co-Managing Editor
Jeff Jackson (Washburn): Lead Editor
Amy Langenfeld (Arizona State): Lead Editor
Joan Magat (Duke): Lead Editor (and a former Editor-in-Chief)
Kristen Murray (Temple): Lead Editor
Amy Griffin (Colorado): Associate Editor
Carol Mallory (Northeastern): Associate Editor
Aliza Milner (Syracuse): Associate Editor
Nantiya Ruan (Denver): Book Review Editor
 
Hat tip to Margaret Hannon of Michigan Law School
 
(mew)

August 13, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2020

Appalachian Law School is Hiring

The Appalachian School of Law in Grundy, Virginia, invites applications from entry-level and lateral candidates for a full-time legalwriting faculty position.

Applicants must be able to demonstrate a high probability of success as a teacher and awillingness to contribute to the law school's academic mission.

Applicants must possess a J.D. or equivalent degree andoutstanding academic credentials. Relevant experience in private practice, government service or a judicial clerkship is preferred. We strongly encouragewomen, minorities and others who would enrich the diversity of our academiccommunity to apply.

To learn more about our Law School, please visit their website at http://www.asl.edu for more information. Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and three references by email at personnel@asl.edu

(mew)

August 10, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 9, 2020

Last Call for Nominations for the AALS-LWRR Section Award

Here's a final reminder that the Awards Committee of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is soliciting nominations for the 2021 Section Award. This prestigious award recognizes individuals who have made a significant lifetime contribution to the field of legal writing and research.

 

The deadline for submitting nominations for the 2021 Section Award is Friday, August 14, 2020. The committee encourages nominations that reflect the richness and diversity of the legal writing community, including nominations of women, people of color, and members of other traditionally underrepresented groups.

 

Although there is no specific nomination form, committee members will appreciate a thorough and thoughtful nomination letter explaining the ways in which the nominee has contributed to the field of legal writing and research. Also, a link to a publicly available professional biography or CV is helpful. Please send nominations to both committee co-chairs, Ken Swift, krswift@central.uh.edu, and Dana Hill, dana-hill@law.northwestern.edu. Please note that, due to a change in the section bylaws, previous year nominations no longer carry over. Nominators are free to resubmit materials from a previous year’s nomination.

 

The 2021 AALS Section award will be presented at the Section Luncheon during the AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. The luncheon is a ticketed event.

 

The award was created at the AALS Section Business Meeting in 1995 and conferred for the first time in January 1996 at the AALS Annual Meeting. Past winners of the AALS Section Award include the following:

 

2020 – Grace Tonner (UC-Irvine)

2019 – Charles Calleros (Arizona State)

2018 – Darby Dickerson (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2017 – Linda Berger (UNLV)

2016 – Suzanne Rowe (Oregon)

2015 – Mark E. Wojcik (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2014 – Jan Levine (Duquesne)

2013 – Terrill Pollman (UNLV) and Jill Ramsfield (Hawaii) [two winners]

2012 – Susan Brody (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago) and Mary Barnard Ray (Wisconsin) [two winners]

2011 – Elizabeth Fajans (Brooklyn)

2010 – Joe Kimble (Thomas Cooley)

2009 – Richard K. Neumann, Jr. (Hofstra)

2008 – Eric Easton (Baltimore)

2007 – Anne Enquist (Seattle)

2006 – Terri LeClercq (Texas)

2005 – Marilyn Walter (Brooklyn)

2003 – Laurel Currie Oates (Seattle)

2002 – Helene Shapo (Northwestern)

1997 – Ralph Brill (Chicago-Kent)

1996 – Mary Lawrence (Oregon)

The Awards Committee is co-chaired by Ken Swift (Houston) and Dana Hill (Northwestern) and the members are Heather Baxter (Nova), DeLeith Gossett (Texas Tech), Lucy Jewel (Tennessee), Dyane O’Leary (Suffolk), Pamela Saindon (UIC-J. Marshall), Susie Salmon (Arizona), Michelle Zakarin (Touro).

 

The Chair of the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is Mary Adkins; the Chair-Elect is Rosa Kim; the Secretary is Lori Johnson; and the Past Chair is Wendy-Adele Humphrey. The other members of the Executive Committee, which will approve the recommendations of the Awards Committee, are Kate Brem, Candace M. Centeno, Shailini J. George, Sammy M. Mansour, and Kayonia L Whetstone.

 

Hat tip to Dana Hill.

 

(mew)

August 9, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 27, 2020

AALS 2021 Annual Meeting Goes Online

AALS LogoGiven the risks posed by COVID-19, and considering feedback gathered from faculty and deans across the United States, the Association of American Law Schools announced today that it will  hold the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in a virtual format rather than holding the in-person meeting in San Francisco.

(mew)

July 27, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 26, 2020

Nominations for AALS-LWRR Section Award

Here's a reminder that the Awards Committee of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is soliciting nominations for the 2021 Section Award. This prestigious award recognizes individuals who have made a significant lifetime contribution to the field of legal writing and research.

 

The deadline for submitting nominations for the 2021 Section Award is Friday, August 14, 2020. The committee encourages nominations that reflect the richness and diversity of the legal writing community, including nominations of women, people of color, and members of other traditionally underrepresented groups.

 

Although there is no specific nomination form, committee members will appreciate a thorough and thoughtful nomination letter explaining the ways in which the nominee has contributed to the field of legal writing and research. Also, a link to a publicly available professional biography or CV is helpful. Please send nominations to both committee co-chairs, Ken Swift, krswift@central.uh.edu, and Dana Hill, dana-hill@law.northwestern.edu. Please note that, due to a change in the section bylaws, previous year nominations no longer carry over. Nominators are free to resubmit materials from a previous year’s nomination.

 

The 2021 AALS Section award will be presented at the Section Luncheon during the AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. The luncheon is a ticketed event.

 

The award was created at the AALS Section Business Meeting in 1995 and conferred for the first time in January 1996 at the AALS Annual Meeting. Past winners of the AALS Section Award include the following:

 

2020 – Grace Tonner (UC-Irvine)

2019 – Charles Calleros (Arizona State)

2018 – Darby Dickerson (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2017 – Linda Berger (UNLV)

2016 – Suzanne Rowe (Oregon)

2015 – Mark E. Wojcik (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2014 – Jan Levine (Duquesne)

2013 – Terrill Pollman (UNLV) and Jill Ramsfield (Hawaii) [two winners]

2012 – Susan Brody (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago) and Mary Barnard Ray (Wisconsin) [two winners]

2011 – Elizabeth Fajans (Brooklyn)

2010 – Joe Kimble (Thomas Cooley)

2009 – Richard K. Neumann, Jr. (Hofstra)

2008 – Eric Easton (Baltimore)

2007 – Anne Enquist (Seattle)

2006 – Terri LeClercq (Texas)

2005 – Marilyn Walter (Brooklyn)

2003 – Laurel Currie Oates (Seattle)

2002 – Helene Shapo (Northwestern)

1997 – Ralph Brill (Chicago-Kent)

1996 – Mary Lawrence (Oregon)

The Awards Committee is co-chaired by Ken Swift (Houston) and Dana Hill (Northwestern) and the members are Heather Baxter (Nova), DeLeith Gossett (Texas Tech), Lucy Jewel (Tennessee), Dyane O’Leary (Suffolk), Pamela Saindon (UIC-J. Marshall), Susie Salmon (Arizona), Michelle Zakarin (Touro).

 

The Chair of the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is Mary Adkins; the Chair-Elect is Rosa Kim; the Secretary is Lori Johnson; and the Past Chair is Wendy-Adele Humphrey. The other members of the Executive Committee, which will approve the recommendations of the Awards Committee, are Kate Brem, Candace M. Centeno, Shailini J. George, Sammy M. Mansour, and Kayonia L Whetstone.

 

Hat tip to Dana Hill.

 

(mew)

July 26, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 20, 2020

New Editorial Board Announced for the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute

The Legal Writing Institute announced some new members of the Editorial Board members for the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute:

Irene Ten Cate

Annalee Hickman

Sara Ochs

Wayne Schiess

Drew Simshaw

Christine Venter

Katherine Vukadin

Pamela Wilkins

 

They join these experienced Editorial Board members:

Alyssa Dragnich

Liz Frost

Elizabeth Inglehart

Tami Lefko

Lori Johnson

Sarah Morath

Dyane O'Leary

Rachel Stabler

Brenda Tofte

Kathy Vinson

 

Congratulations also to the new Editorial Board leadership:

Elizabeth Inglehart, Editor-in-Chief

Liz Frost, Assistant Editor-in-Chief

Sarah Morath, Dyane O’Leary, and Rachel Stabler, Managing Editors

Lori Johnson, Book Review Editor

Brenda Tofte, Essay Editor

 

And these members of the Editorial Board are rotating off after aerving the Journal and the legal writing community:

Lindsey Gustafson

Anna Hemmingway

Kim Holst

Jeff Jablonski

Lisa Mazzie

Karen Sneddon

 

Hat tip to Lindsey Gustafson

 

(mew)

July 20, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

JLWI Call for Essays and Book Reviews!

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Legal Writing: The Journal of the Legal Writing Institute, invites essay and book review submissions around the theme of “Disruption” to be considered for publication in Volume 25 of JLWI (March 2021).  JLWI encourages writers to think about the topic broadly, considering the following questions, among others:

  • How has COVID-19 and/or the civil unrest surrounding police brutality disrupted or changed your approach to teaching?  Your course goals?  Your scholarship?
  • Do you find yourself thinking differently about interactions with students and colleagues as you learn from these disruptions?
  • Are these disruptions good or bad and why?     

Call for Essays:

JLWI is specifically looking for essays related to the long-term effects these major societal disruptions have had on your approach to legal writing and your future teaching and scholarship (rather than online teaching tips). Essays should continue the Journal’s mission, which is to provide a forum for the publication of scholarly works on the theory, substance, and pedagogy of legal writing. Essays may be scholarly either because they fully prove a thesis with relevant support or because they are part of a larger, coordinated section of related essays that build on each other toward a shared thesis. Essays should not feel like an underdeveloped article. The form an author chooses — essay or article — should be driven by the thesis and its necessary proof.   An essay is typically shorter than an article and may be less formal and more personal. It may focus on an unusual experience in, or insight into, the field or careful analysis of a new topic. An essay often demonstrates a deft hand with humor or a lovely way with words. Essays in JLWI ranging in length from 500 to 3,000 words. Please submit essays for consideration by email no later than Thursday, October 1, 2020, to Brenda Tofte: bltofte@gmail.com

Call for Book Reviews:

JLWI encourages writers to submit a proposal for a book review on the topic of disruption, also keeping in mind the Journal's mission.  Book reviews in JLWI typically run between 1,000 and 3,000 words.  The deadline for submitting book review proposals is Monday August 3, 2020, and book review drafts will be due by October 1, 2020.  An accepted proposal is not a guarantee of publication in the Journal (as final book reviews remain subject to editorial approval). Please submit both proposals and completed book reviews to the Journal’s Book Review Editor, Lori Johnson: Lori.Johnson@unlv.edu

To read book essays and book reviews JLWI printed in previous volumes, please visit http://www.legalwritingjournal.org/volume-24/.  

{ldj}

July 15, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 6, 2020

Nominations for AALS-LWRR Section Award

The Awards Committee of the Association of American Law Schools Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is now soliciting nominations for the 2021 Section Award. This prestigious award recognizes individuals who have made a significant lifetime contribution to the field of legal writing and research.

 

The deadline for submitting nominations for the 2021 Section Award is Friday, August 14, 2020. The committee encourages nominations that reflect the richness and diversity of the legal writing community, including nominations of women, people of color, and members of other traditionally underrepresented groups.

 

Although there is no specific nomination form, committee members will appreciate a thorough and thoughtful nomination letter explaining the ways in which the nominee has contributed to the field of legal writing and research. Also, a link to a publicly available professional biography or CV is helpful. Please send nominations to both committee co-chairs, Ken Swift, krswift@central.uh.edu, and Dana Hill, dana-hill@law.northwestern.edu. Please note that, due to a change in the section bylaws, previous year nominations no longer carry over. Nominators are free to resubmit materials from a previous year’s nomination.

 

The 2021 AALS Section award will be presented at the Section Luncheon during the AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco. The luncheon is a ticketed event.

 

The award was created at the AALS Section Business Meeting in 1995 and conferred for the first time in January 1996 at the AALS Annual Meeting. Past winners of the AALS Section Award include the following:

 

2020 – Grace Tonner (UC-Irvine)

2019 – Charles Calleros (Arizona State)

2018 – Darby Dickerson (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2017 – Linda Berger (UNLV)

2016 – Suzanne Rowe (Oregon)

2015 – Mark E. Wojcik (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago)

2014 – Jan Levine (Duquesne)

2013 – Terrill Pollman (UNLV) and Jill Ramsfield (Hawaii) [two winners]

2012 – Susan Brody (The John Marshall Law School-Chicago) and Mary Barnard Ray (Wisconsin) [two winners]

2011 – Elizabeth Fajans (Brooklyn)

2010 – Joe Kimble (Thomas Cooley)

2009 – Richard K. Neumann, Jr. (Hofstra)

2008 – Eric Easton (Baltimore)

2007 – Anne Enquist (Seattle)

2006 – Terri LeClercq (Texas)

2005 – Marilyn Walter (Brooklyn)

2003 – Laurel Currie Oates (Seattle)

2002 – Helene Shapo (Northwestern)

1997 – Ralph Brill (Chicago-Kent)

1996 – Mary Lawrence (Oregon)

The Awards Committee is co-chaired by Ken Swift (Houston) and Dana Hill (Northwestern) and the members are Heather Baxter (Nova), DeLeith Gossett (Texas Tech), Lucy Jewel (Tennessee), Dyane O’Leary (Suffolk), Pamela Saindon (UIC-J. Marshall), Susie Salmon (Arizona), Michelle Zakarin (Touro).

 

The Chair of the AALS Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research is Mary Adkins; the Chair-Elect is Rosa Kim; the Secretary is Lori Johnson; and the Past Chair is Wendy-Adele Humphrey. The other members of the Executive Committee, which will approve the recommendations of the Awards Committee, are Kate Brem, Candace M. Centeno, Shailini J. George, Sammy M. Mansour, and Kayonia L Whetstone.

 

Hat tip to Dana Hill.

 

(mew)

July 6, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 2, 2020

Loyola New Orleans is Hiring a Westerfield Fellow

Position:  Westerfield Fellow, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law; start date: August 2020 

Description: This position is designed for individuals pursuing a career in law teaching and seeking to gain law teaching experience, while being afforded time to devote to scholarly writing and publication.  Applicants should have strong academic credentials, writing experience in a judicial clerkship, law practice, or both, and excellent written and oral communication skills.  The Fellow will be responsible for teaching legal reasoning, legal research, legal writing, and oral advocacy skills to two sections of first-year law students in a three-credit hour class each semester.  The Fellow will teach his or her own classes, but will have the benefit of working under the guidance of an experienced director and with experienced professors in a program in which the director and the professors teaching the courses coordinate the content and pace of the courses.  The Fellow will also have student teaching assistants to aid with courses.  The Fellow will have a faculty mentor in addition to the other professors teaching in the program.  One-year contracts may be renewed.  Salary is competitive with fellowships of a similar nature.  Westerfield Fellows have been successful in obtaining tenure track positions at a number of ABA accredited law schools.

About the School: The College of Law is located in a largely residential area of New Orleans, one of the most culturally diverse cities in the United States, with unique cuisine, numerous museums and historical sites, and a flourishing arts community.  New Orleans is also the seat of the United States Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana, the Louisiana Supreme Court, and the Louisiana Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, as well as other lower courts.   The College of Law has a student population of approximately 500 students, over forty faculty members, active clinics that have spearheaded numerous social justice reform efforts, and summer programs in Europe and Central America.  Its location in Louisiana, one of the world’s best known “mixed jurisdictions,” provides unique opportunities for comparative and international law scholarship.

Loyola University New Orleans is an educational institution dedicated to fostering intellectual achievement, personal development, and social responsibility, and it is committed to the human dignity and worth of every person.  Loyola University New Orleans strives to create and maintain a working and learning environment in which individuals are treated with dignity, decency, and respect. The University acknowledges and values individual differences, including, but not limited to, the dimensions of race; color; sex; national origin; age; religion; gender identity; transgender status; sexual orientation; ethnicity; disability status; and marital status and citizenship status. We recognize that diversity enriches our social interactions and intellectual lives, and we strongly encourage applications from individuals who will bring diversity to the College of Law.

Dean Louis Westerfield was the first African American dean of the College of Law.  He is remembered for promoting diversity and excellence in legal education.

Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.  Applications should be emailed to resumes@loyno.edu. 

Hat tip to Mary Garvey Algero.

(mew)

July 2, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 30, 2020

Susie Salmon Wins the 2020 Edith Sayer Auslander Established Visionary Award

Professor Susie Salmon of the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law has been selected by the Arizona State University Commission on the Status of Women, Equity, and Mentoring workgroup as a recipient of the 2020 Edith Sayer Auslander Established Visionary Award.

This award honors leaders who exemplify the vision set out by the original Arizona Board of Regents Commission in 1990. Vision Award recipients cultivate diversity and actively advance CSW goals relating to campus climate, career and professional development, and issues of equity and inclusion.

Hat tip to Professor Tessa L. Dysart

(mew)

May 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bluebook Rule on Citing Movies

While we all wait patiently for the new, 21st edition of the Bluebook to appear next month, here's an essay to enjoy by Rafi Reznik on the burning subject of whether Bluebook Rule 18.6 is really the best way to cite movies.

Hat tip to Andrew Kerr.

(mew)

May 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

What Should Law Schools Do Now to Plan for the Fall Semester: Guest Blog Post from Mary Garvey Algero -- A Response to Professor Josh Blackman's "Typical University Day in the COVID-19 Era"

Professor Josh Blackman is a constitutional law professor at the South Texas College of Law in Houston, an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, and the President of the Harlan Institute. Professor Blackman recently posted an essay on the Volokh Conspiracy regarding what our law schools would look like in fall 2020 if we are on the ground. At the end of his essay, "A Typical University Day in the COVID-19 Era," he admits it "was written somewhat tongue-in-cheek" but that he hoped to convey that "Nostalgia for 'in-person' classes may distort judgments about what this experience will look like in the fall."
 
Mary Garvey AlgeroDean Mary Garvey Algero wrote a response to Professor Blackman's essay, and we're publishing it here on the Legal Writing Prof Blog. Dean Algero is the Associate Dean of Faculty Development and Academic Affairs, the Philip and Eugenie Brooks Distinguished Professor of Law and the Warren E. Mouledoux Distinguished Professor of Law at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law.
 
(mew)
 
Here is Dean Algero's response:

What Should Law Schools Do Now to Plan for the Fall Semester

Inspired by Josh Blackman’s essay of 5/22

by Mary Garvey Algero

“Necessity is the mother of invention.” (An English proverb of unknown origin, meaning that ingenious solutions often come from difficult situations.)

Imagine if law schools had given up in March 2020 when the pandemic was imminent, and we had simply told students we would resume law school once we had a vaccine or even a cure for Covid-19.  We could have said that only classes that faculty had previously designated as online classes would be able to continue and finish out the spring semester in April or May 2020; the rest would be on hold.  We could have justified that decision by pointing to the following: 1) ABA Standard 306, which limits hours earned by law students through distance education (online); 2) our own law school rules about distance education, such as rules that courses to be taught in an online format must be approved in advance of the semester by the full faculty; and 3) the reality that many of our faculty not only had never taught online, but they did not even know how or where to start and what platform to use. 

We did not do that.  We worked hard to figure out a way to complete the semester.  Moreover, we figured this out in an extremely short timeframe.  We brainstormed with ABA officials to work on waiving rules that stood in the way of teaching out the semester online.  We brainstormed with each other and with our faculty, staff, and students to figure out ways to continue the semester and complete classes from a distance.  We met with our university administrations to ensure they had contracts with platforms that allowed large online video meetings/classes and to ensure that all professors had licenses to use these services.  We scrambled to get technology in the hands of the people who needed it—faculty, staff, and students.  Some faculty had to upgrade desktop or laptop computers or purchase cameras or microphones to be ready to teach online.  Students had to do the same.  We found funds to purchase laptops, tablets, and “hotspots” to deliver to students. 

We gathered people from across our universities who either knew how to use the technology or were willing to devote the time to learn the technology so that we had a team of people who were “experts.”  These experts instructed faculty on how to use the technology to teach and function successfully online.  These experts held workshops for faculty, they met with faculty individually, and we even assigned them to assist particular faculty members as they taught until they were comfortable.  In large part, we counted on our students to figure out the technology, but we also offered them assistance from our group of experts if they needed it.  We held meetings online, both one-on-one and in large groups to reassure students, to answer their questions, and to find out what their concerns were so that we could try to respond to them. 

We held many faculty meetings.  Not only were these meetings focused on responding to individual questions or needs, but also these meetings were key to developing policies about grading and attendance and other issues that needed to be decided because of our changed circumstances.

All of this was done in an extraordinarily short time period because it had to be.  Because we, as law school administrators, faculty, and staff, were committed to providing our students with the rich education they deserve.

So, now we face decisions about the fall semester and what our law schools will look like.  We owe it to everyone involved, and especially our students, to think through all of the issues we could face with offering an on-ground experience, to prioritize the things we value most about that on-ground experience, and to determine what we can do successfully.  The Blackman essay points out some real concerns and issues that law schools face for the fall.  I appreciate the sobering reality of it all.  However, rather than resigning ourselves to the obvious difficulties of education in person before a vaccine, I think we owe it to all involved to think creatively about what can be--to think creatively through the pros and cons; to consider the issues and how we might solve for them. 

For example, if we value providing 1L students with an on-ground experience because we want them to get to know each other and us in person and feel a part of the law school community, we can work through issues of their presence on campus to provide that experience because we decide it is worth it.  We might stagger class start times so that we limit the number of students moving through the building at any given time.  We could consider dividing students into small cohorts who attend some classes in a compressed schedule only on certain days of the week, while attending other classes online.  These students could have assigned seats in only one or two classrooms for the days they are in the building, thereby limiting their need for movement and contact.  Perhaps we assign each cohort a faculty member and a staff member to be their contact with the school should issues arise.  We might have various members of the law school community visit these small cohorts throughout the semester, before or after classes, to address them on law school matters, to introduce them to the school, and to help them feel that they are a part of the larger law school community. 

Yes, if we do this we must figure out stairway traffic, restroom availability, and many other logistical issues that might seem impossible at first blush.  However, we would solve for these issues because we would have decided that this on-ground experience was valuable enough to our students and our law schools that it was worth the extra work and resources. 

What we did in March and April was not easy, but we did it.  Had someone told us at the AALS Annual meeting in January that we would move all of our courses and programs online over the course of a week or two in March with little warning, we would have laughed and rejected the possibility.  We now sit with a few months (not just a few days) to plan for a fall semester.  I suggest that law schools immediately identify what we value for us and our students in terms of on-ground experiences, we identify what we can do well at a distance, and we work to make those things happen successfully, knowing the obstacles.  Not only will providing successful on-ground experiences require ingenuity, expertise, and contingency planning, but successful distance teaching will require these same things. 

The planning for the fall 2020 semester is and will continue to be intense.  It will also likely provide us with some new ways of doing things we may choose to continue even beyond a pandemic.  So, push up your sleeves and think creatively about what your law school values, what you do well, and how you can best deliver those things.  Engage experts and stakeholders in your discussions so that you consider the many sides of the issues under consideration and figure out what is actually possible.  And, write in pencil so that you can make changes when your plans must be adjusted because of new or different circumstances.                

Mary Garvey Algero

May 27, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 16, 2020

Vance Legal Writing Competition on Customs and International Trade Law

Miami Law is now hosting the Andrew Vance Memorial Essay Competition in cooperation with the Customs and International Trade Bar Association (CITBA).  The competition awards cash prizes to two students, and there's  a publication opportunity in the Miami International and Comparative Law Review. Students can be in a J.D. or LL.M. program.

This year's deadline is May 22, 2020, which is probably too soon for most students. But you never know who might have a paper ready to submit. Click here for the details.

Hat tip to Kathleen Claussen at the University of Miami School of Law

(mew)

May 16, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)