Saturday, May 29, 2021

Call for Submissions: Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal

From Marty Malin, one of the editors of the Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal (along with Michael Green and Noah Zatz). Note that this is one of the few, peer-reviewed law journals. I may be biased, as I'm on the board of the journal and participate in the editing process, but I think they do a very good job of providing quick and useful reviews of submissions--especially with its accelerated review process. 

Employee Rights and Employment Policy Journal invites you to submit your work for publication. This summer we are again using a special review process for submissions received by Thursday, July 1. For these submissions, we will complete our peer-review selection process by Friday, August 13. Selected articles will be published in the final issue of 2021 (volume 25). For more than twenty-four years, EREPJ has been a faculty-edited, peer-reviewed journal based at Chicago-Kent College of Law. Since 2016, it has been a joint project of Chicago-Kent and The Labor Law Group. Our process is quite different from the sometimes frustrating one typical of student-run law reviews. Our peer-review process provides authors with editorial suggestions from their peers who are knowledgeable about the areas in which the authors are writing, as well as light editing and rapid publication post-acceptance.

The one downside to the peer review process is that it often takes more time than the typical student-run law journal review process. To address this, EREPJ is committing itself to an accelerated review process: you send us your work by July 1, and we will give you an answer on or before August 13. This rapid turnaround means that if we do not offer to publish your work, you will still be able to submit it to student-run journals in the late summer/early fall submission season. During our review period, out of respect for the time of our colleagues who will be conducting the double-blind review, we ask that you not submit your article for consideration by another journal.

Submissions to EREPJ are treated to a double-blind review by members of the editorial board (a group of distinguished professors in labor and employment law and related disciplines) and edited by your peers—people who can help you improve your work, not just publish it. You receive suggestions that you may use at your discretion—we do not rewrite your article (although we do correct errant citations, grammar mistakes, typos, and the like). We have a student staff that performs Bluebooking and cite-checking but our authors never have to deal with them—we do!

Finally, under our standard publication agreement, you retain the copyright and give us a nonexclusive license to publish and to sublicense others. We respect our authors' time, we respect their expertise, we respect their writing styles, and we respect their intellectual property rights. We encourage you to publish with us.

Please submit articles by e-mail to [email protected] or use the submission portal at http://go.iit.edu/erepj (n.b. to facilitate the double-blind review, make sure that all identifying information—your name; institutional affiliation; postal and email addresses; and phone number—is on a separate cover).

Jeff Hirsch 

May 29, 2021 in Labor and Employment News, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 24, 2021

Hayden & Bodie: New Article, Book on Codetermination & Corporate Governance

Hayden-Grant-M Bodie_matthewGrant Hayden (SMU) and Matt Bodie (SLU) have both a new article and a new book out. The article is Codetermination in Theory and Practice, 73 Fla. L. Rev. 321 (2021). Here's the abstract:

Codetermination—a system of shared corporate governance between shareholders and workers—has been mostly ignored within the U.S. corporate governance literature. When it has made an appearance, it has largely served as a foil for shareholder primacy and as an example of corporate deviance. However, over the last fifteen years—and especially in the last five—empirical research on codetermination has shown surprising results as to the system’s efficiency, resilience, and benefits to stakeholders.

This Article reviews the extant American legal scholarship on codetermination and provides a fresh look at the current state of codetermination theory and practice. Rather than experiencing the failures predicted by our law-and-economics framework of shareholder primacy, codetermination has fared better than alternative systems, particularly with respect to the ravages of the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. At a time when corporate leaders, politicians, and academics are rethinking the shareholder primacy model, this Article presents an updated perspective on codetermination and invites U.S. scholars to reexamine their prior assumptions.

The new book is Reconstructing the Corporation: From Shareholder Primacy to Shared Governance (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2021). Here's a description:

Modern corporations contribute to a wide range of contemporary problems, including income inequality, global warming, and the influence of money in politics. Their relentless pursuit of profits, though, is the natural outcome of the doctrine of shareholder primacy. As the consensus around this doctrine crumbles, it has become increasingly clear that the prerogatives of corporate governance have been improperly limited to shareholders. It is time to examine shareholder primacy and its attendant governance features anew, and reorient the literature around the basic purpose of corporations. This book critically examines the current state of corporate governance law and provides decisive rebuttals to longstanding arguments for the exclusive shareholder franchise. Reconstructing the Corporation presents a new model of corporate governance - one that builds on the theory of the firm as well as a novel theory of democratic participation - to support the extension of the corporate franchise to employees.

Congratulations!!!

rb

May 24, 2021 in Book Club, Scholarship, Workplace Trends | Permalink | Comments (0)

Conference: Future of Work & AI

GenevaDesiree LeClerq (Cornell ILR) sends word of an upcoming (free to register) video conference on 3 June at 4pm CET for a joint conference series on the Future of Work and AI. Here is the description:

Big data and artificial Intelligence have started to impact Human Resource management. Hiring, firing, performance appraisal, competence development and talent management have all seen an increasing use of AI-based tools. Where do we stand at the moment in this process? What can AI already achieve today and what may it achieve in the near future? And will the employment of AI also create more opportunities and bestow us with better jobs?

Join us on 3 June at 4pm CET for a discussion with top speakers Peter Cappelli (Wharton School), Ashutosh Garg (Eightfold.AI) and Janine Berg (International Labour Organization) as well as many other experts during the first event of our joint conference series on the Future of Work and AI. Register here,

rb

 

May 24, 2021 in Workplace Trends | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 13, 2021

DC LERA Webinar: Worker Cooperatives in Spain

Dc leraTequila Brooks writes to tell us about another great DC LERA webinar: Worker Cooperatives in Spain. It will be Wednesday, May 19, 2021, 11AM - 12 pm Eastern Time. The webinar will be in the form of a conversation between Oskar Goitia, Chairman of the Mondragon Corporation, and Lucia Ortiz Sanz of the Embassy of Spain to the United States, about worker cooperatives in Spain and around the world. It's free; register here.

rb

May 13, 2021 in Conferences & Colloquia, International & Comparative L.E.L. | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Business, Forced-Labor in China, and the ILO

HillJanice Bellace (U. Penn. - Wharton) and George Dragnich (DC LERA) published yesterday an op-ed in “The Hill” entitled A path for business out of the China forced labor dilemma.  Here's Janice's description of the op-ed:

It addresses the China Uyghurs forced-labor situation and the role the ILO could play. It is written to attract the attention of companies by pointing out why companies might want to explore this possibility and explaining one way employers could pursue this route could be in June at the International Labour Conference.

George and I wrote this to draw attention to the ILO and its role regarding the abolition of forced labour. As you know, in the U.S., the media nearly always totally ignore the ILO. Even though Kevin Cassidy in the Washington office of the ILO has done terrific work in trying to close this recognition gap, it is an uphill slog. For instance, truly annoying is when they are discussing ILO labor standards (as was done recently in an article about the Xinjiang situation) and they refer to "a UN agency" rather than "the ILO." Since the dilemma facing companies has received coverage recently, we thought this and the timeliness of the issue would be “the hook” for a piece (since newspapers and other media typically want to see what will attract readers to the item, what will hook them in).

George and I both believe that the ILO has an important role to play and in fact, the most useful role with regard to the abolition of forced labour in Xinjiang. We hope this op-ed piece makes a helpful contribution.

rb

May 11, 2021 in International & Comparative L.E.L., Labor and Employment News, Wage & Hour | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 7, 2021

Labor Rights and Geospatial Data

GeoEthics-web-bannerAriana Levinson (Louisville) sends word of this international and interdisciplinary webinar on labor rights and geospatial data that will be taking place on June 1 at 11 a.m.- 1:30 p.m. EST. The webinar is being sponsored by the American Association of Geographers as part of its GeoEthics series.

The panelists will be:

  • Jenny Chan (China Research and Development Network, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University) will discuss Independent Contractors in China’s Last-Mile Delivery (Buy with 1-Click).
  • Christina Jayne Colclough (Why Not Lab) will discuss Why Workers Need Much Stronger Collective Data Rights (In Defense of the Right to be Human).
  • Dragana Kaurin (Localization Lab) will discuss the Use of Geospatial Data in Workplace Immigration Raids (Tracking People and Movement).
  • Ariana Levinson (University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law) will discuss Workers’ Rights, Legislation, and Creative Litigation.
  • The webinar will be co-moderated by Richard P. Appelbaum (University of California, Santa Barbara) and William A. Herbert (Hunter College, City University of New York.

rb

May 7, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, May 6, 2021

Grossman & Thomas on Post-Young Pregnancy Accommodation Cases

In Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc., the Supreme Court created a modified McDonnell Douglas standard to evaluate pregnancy accommodation cases. If you are wondering how courts are handling these claims post-Young, I highly recommend an article by Joanna Grossman and Gillian Thomas. Their article, Making Sure Pregnancy Works: Accommodation Claims After Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc., discusses appellate and trial court opinions post-Young and shows how Young affected how courts analyze these claims.

The article is published at 14 Harv. L. & Pol'y Rev. 319, 330 (2020) and is also available here.

-Sandra Sperino

May 6, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)