Friday, April 26, 2019

COSELL XIV at UNLV on Oct. 11-12, Registration Available!

Friends-of-Blog Ann McGinley and Ruben Garcia send along the first announcement regarding COSELL this year which will be held at UNLV:

14th Annual Colloquium on Scholarship of Employment & Labor Law (COSELL)

The 14th Annual Colloquium on Scholarship of Employment & Labor Law (COSELL) will be take place in Las Vegas, Nevada at UNLV Boyd School of Law on Columbus Day weekend (October 11-12).  To register for the conference (we urge you to do so early), please click this link:

https://law.unlv.edu/event/14th-annual-colloquium-scholarship-labor-and-employment-law  

IMPORTANT: Hotels in Las Vegas for Colloquium

COSELL will be held during a very busy weekend (Columbus Day Oct. 11-12) in Las Vegas, and we urge you to make your reservations RIGHT AWAY. There are a number of nice hotels with good rates. We would recommend the following hotels, whose employees are represented by the Culinary Workers Union (and other unions as well). The prices listed on the Internet for the following hotels as of April 24, 2019 are reasonable for Strip hotels on the weekend (in the low $100s per night) will go up.

Some Recommended hotels:

Mandalay Bay – This is our top recommendation; our dinner on Friday night will be at Border Grill, which is located in Mandalay Bay. The Miller and Zimmer awards will be presented at the dinner at Border Grill.

Park MGM

Paris Las Vegas

If these hotels do not fit your budget, there are other hotels that are even cheaper. Check fairhotel.org and search “Las Vegas” for a list of hotels.

WARNING: Prices and availability do not last long. PLEASE BOOK EARLY.

 

 

 

April 26, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 22, 2019

Supreme Court Agrees to Decide Whether Title VII Covers LGBT Status

The Supreme Court has just granted cert. in three cases to determine whether Title VII prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. We've covered this issue for years, as the answer has gone from largely a uniform "no"; to the EEOC and DOJ saying "yes," while the circuits courts said "no"; to the current situation where some courts say "yes," others say "no," the EEOC says "yes," and the DOJ says "no." You get the idea--maybe the perfect storm of the classic split that attracts Supreme Court attention.

To say that I'm not optimistic about the Court holding that LGBT status is covered by Title VII is an understatement. I can probably best summarize my prediction by saying that I'd have more hope if Justice Scalia was still on the Court, as he would occasionally argue for strong deferral to the EEOC, even when he likely disagreed personally with the result (showing his past as an administrative law professor). The issue is really interesting from a legal perspective. It involve congressional purpose and history, statutory interpretation, and policy consequences that can go in different directions depending on its application in other cases--and that can result in political outcomes that advocates may not always like. The oral arguments in these cases will definitely have some fireworks, and the sure-to-be split decision will likely be quite heated. So hold on tight . . . .

-Jeff Hirsch

April 22, 2019 in Employment Discrimination, Labor and Employment News | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 11, 2019

New Book: Sperino's Law of Employment Discrimination

SperinoCongratulations to Sandra Sperino (Cincinnati) on the publication of her new book The Law of Employment Discrimination (1st ed., West 2019). Here's the publisher's description: 

This book provides comprehensive treatment of the major federal employment discrimination statutes, focusing on Title VII, the ADEA, the ADA, and Section 1981. It discusses who is liable for discrimination and the people the statutes protect from discrimination. The book offers an extensive discussion of the frameworks for analyzing discrimination, including frameworks for individual disparate treatment, pattern or practice, harassment, disparate impact, and retaliation. One chapter focuses on religious accommodation and another chapter focuses on disability accommodation. The book also contains separate treatment of affirmative action. It also explores defenses to discrimination claims, the procedure for pursuing claims, and remedies. The book provides extensive discussion of canonical cases.

rb

April 11, 2019 in Book Club, Employment Discrimination | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 5, 2019

Two Great Articles

Tippett HodgesLiz Tippett (Oregon) and Ann Hodges (Richmond, emerita) have each posted on SSRN terrific articles on unrelated labor/employment topics; both have been or will be published in the Employee Rights & Employment Policy Journal. Liz's article is Opportunity Discrimination: A Hidden Liability Employers Can Fix; here's an excerpt from the abstract:

This article applies a model of workplace advancement where big employment decisions — like promotions and pay raises — are influenced in part by the disparate distribution of smaller opportunities over time. These smaller opportunities generally do not qualify as “adverse employment actions” for the purpose of a discrimination claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. However, their legal significance has been underestimated. The disparate denial of smaller opportunities has been successfully used as evidence of disparate treatment when plaintiffs are later denied a big opportunity.

...

This article argues that employers should identify and address disparities at the opportunity level to advance workplace equality. Drawing from social science research on discrimination in school discipline, employers could identify the particular decision points and contextual factors that drive disparities and use that information to address the problem. Such undertakings would also be compatible with existing internal employment structures.

Ann's article is Employee Voice in Arbitration; here's the abstract:

The Supreme Court’s 2018 decision in Epic Systems v. Lewis allows employers to force employees to agree to individual arbitration of any claims against the employer, removing their ability to bring class and collective actions. These unilaterally imposed arbitration agreements deprive employees of any voice in this important term of employment.

If arbitration is to serve its intended function of a mutually agreeable forum to resolve disputes, Congress should require employers who desire to use arbitration to negotiate the terms of the agreement with a representative of their affected employees. Such a requirement would reduce some of the adverse effects of employment arbitration, making it more like labor arbitration, which has functioned as an effective dispute resolution mechanism under collective bargaining agreements for many years.

A negotiation requirement would insure that employees have notice of the arbitration provision and input into its terms. The National Labor Relations Board could use its existing election machinery to facilitate employee choice of representative which could be an individual, a group of employees, an attorney, a labor union, or another workers’ rights organization. In addition to providing employee voice, requiring negotiation would discourage arbitration where the employer’s only goal is to reduce employee rights and might also spur employee participation in the workplace and the community.

rb

 

April 5, 2019 in Arbitration, Employment Discrimination, Scholarship, Workplace Trends | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 4, 2019

LLRN 4 (Valaparasio, Chile) Program

The program for the 4th LLRN Conference has been announced and, as usual it looks really interesting (except maybe that Future of Work panel  . . .).

You can get the program here: http://www.pucv.cl/uuaa/derecho-del-trabajo/programa/2017-10-11/152305.html

The organizers also send a reminder that the registration deadline and submission for papers is May 25.

-Jeff Hirsch

 

April 4, 2019 in Conferences & Colloquia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Chapman Law Review Call for Papers--OSHA and Other Acts of 1970

Chapman Law Review is holding a call for papers for their next symposium issue: "A 50-Year Retrospective on Major Laws of the 91st Congress." The focus will be on legislation that came out of that period, including OSHA (also the National Environmental Policy Act, the Organized Crime Control Act, the Housing and Urban Development Act, and more). Abstracts of 1,000-1,500 words, along with a current CV, are due June 1, 2019 to Caroline J. Cordova (cordo115@mail.chapman.edu). Deadline for completed papers is August 26, 2019. 
 
You can get more info here: Call for Papers - Chapman Law Review.
 
-Jeff Hirsch

April 4, 2019 in Conferences & Colloquia, Scholarship, Workplace Safety | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Spitko on Regulating the Platform Workplace

SpitkoGary Spitko (Santa Clara) has just posted on SSRN his very timely article (forthcoming 2019 BYU L. Rev.) Reputation Systems Bias in the Platform Workplace. Here's the abstract:

Online reputation systems enable the providers and consumers of a product or service to rate one another and also allow others to rely upon those reputation scores in deciding whether to engage with a particular provider or consumer. Reputation systems are an intrinsic feature of the platform workplace, in which a platform operator, such as Uber or TaskRabbit, intermediates between the provider of a service and the consumer of that service. Operators typically rely upon consumer ratings of providers in rewarding and penalizing providers. Thus, these reputation systems allow an operator to achieve enormous scale while maintaining quality control and user trust without employing supervisors to manage the vast number of providers who engage consumers on the operator’s platform. At the same time, an increasing number of commentators have expressed concerns that the invidious biases of raters impact these reputation systems.

This Article considers how best to mitigate reputation systems bias in the platform workplace. After reviewing and rejecting both a hands-off approach and the anti-exceptionalism approach to regulation of the platform economy, this Article argues in favor of applying what the author labels a “structural-purposive” analysis to regulation of reputation systems discrimination in the platform workplace. A structural-purposive analysis seeks to ensure that regulation is informed by the goals and structure of the existing workplace regulation scheme but also is consistent with the inherent characteristics of the platform economy. Thus, this approach facilitates the screening out of proposed regulation that would be inimical to the inherent characteristics of the platform economy and aids in the framing of regulatory proposals that would leverage those characteristics. This Article then demonstrates the merits of a structural-purposive approach in the context of a regulatory framework addressing reputation systems discrimination in the platform workplace. Applying this approach, the Article derives several principles that should guide regulatory efforts to ameliorate the prevalence and effects of reputation systems bias in the platform workplace and outlines a proposed regulatory framework grounded in those principles.

rb

April 2, 2019 in Employment Discrimination, Scholarship, Workplace Trends | Permalink | Comments (0)