Tuesday, March 17, 2009

SSRN's Most Downloaded Labor and Employment Law Faculty

Ssrn_logo_71 I realize that this list is controversial (see prior posts and comments here and here), but because SSRN downloads are one measure of publishing success, some information on the numbers can tell us who is using SSRN to post work, and who is being read by those who download from SSRN. It's some indication of who is doing some pretty interesting work.

These rankings are taken from the SSRN Top 1,500 Law Authors list, updated of March 14, 2009, and the criteria for selection were inclusion in that list, along with current teaching and writing in the field of Labor and Employment Law. Let me know in the comments if we missed anybody.

Labor & Employment Faculty Rankings by SSRN Downloads

Total New Downloads 

  All-Time Downloads 

Labor Faculty (School)

L&E Rank

Overall Rank

L&E Rank

Overall Rank

Levit, Nancy (UMKC)

1

73

4

298

Long, Alex (Tennesee)

2

99

9

417

Bales, Richard (N. Ky. Chase)

3

127

1

148

Secunda, Paul (Marquette)

4

158

11

478

Stone, Katherine (UCLA)

5

271

6

359

Lobel, Orly (San Diego)

6

317

7

381

Yamada, David (Suffolk)

7

384

30

1332

Dau-Schmidt, Kenneth (Indy Bloomington)

8

430

8

400

LeRoy, Michael (Illinois)

9

438

17

763

Jolls, Christine (Yale)

10

478

2

194

Thomas, Suja (Cincinnati)

11

555

10

432

Dannin, Ellen (Penn State)

12

559

15

655

Rubinstein, Mitchell (Adjunct, NYLS)

13

648

22

1099

Bodie, Matthew (St. Louis)

14

668

17

747

Zelinsky, Edward (Cardozo)

15

780

14

621

Gely, Rafael (Missouri)

16

794

3

285

Gordon, Jennifer (Fordham)

17

902

18

1022

Schwab, Stewart (Cornell)

18

909

5

300

Forman, Jonathan (Oklahoma)

19

924

28

1312

Hutchison, Harry (George Mason)

20

948

23

1116

Cherry, Miriam (McGeorge)

21

981

13

581

Doorey, David (York University)

22

987

27

1310

Selmi, Michael (George Washington)

23

1039

12

547

Hirsch, Jeffrey  (Tennessee)

24

1133

24

1145

Moss, Scott (Colorado)

25

1137

19

1047

Wooten, James (SUNY Buffalo)

26

1169

26

1255

Bagenstos, Samuel (Wash. U., Visiting UCLA)

27

1184

34

2052

Craver, Charles B.(George Washington)

28

1212

31

1356

Kotkin, Minna (Brooklyn)

29

1238

33

1787

Finkin, Matthew (Illinois)

30

1314

21

1076

Lofaso, Anne (West Virginia)

31

1326

32

1653

Davidov, Guy (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem)

32

1359

25

1225

Fisk, Catherine (U.C. Irvine)

33

1391

20

1049

Estreicher, Samuel (NYU)

34

1420

36

2555

Emens, Elizabeth (Columbia)

35

1451

16

742

Befort, Stephen (Minnesota)

36

1467

29

1313

Brake, Deborah  (Pittsburgh)

37

1467

35

2335


MM

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/laborprof_blog/2009/03/ssrns-most-downloaded-labor-and-employment-law-faculty.html

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Comments

As someone whose high ranking for recent downloads is admittedly a bit of a fluke, I'll join with those who believe these lists should be taken with a huge grain of salt.

Last November, I used the publication of two articles as the occasion to finally open an SSRN page. One piece was a law review article that has attracted a respectable readership. The other was a shorter piece on workplace bullying and ethical leadership, targeted at an interdisciplinary audience of scholars and practitioners that appeared in a peer-reviewed leadership journal, that somehow took off and was downloaded hundreds of times over a period of several days. (I'm guessing that somehow it was posted to some site for organizational behavior & management folks.) It wasn't a deep scholarly piece, yet if you look at my ranking and nothing else you'd think I just published some revolutionary article in the Yale L.J.

Personally, I'm delighted that my work apparently has struck a chord with an audience beyond law and outside academe, but if we're looking at these downloads as indicia of scholarly impact amongst law profs, well...my example is reason to question that assumption.

I think that individually, we should be happy when our work is being downloaded by others, as that is one sign of receptivity by whatever audience we're trying to reach. But I have real problems with the increasing commodification of scholarship via rankings of all kinds, especially by the growing tendency to consider those rankings as ends in themselves. Instead, let's try to find ways to support, nurture, and promote good scholarship, period, and to get those works in the hands of people who will benefit from reading them.

-David Yamada


Posted by: David Yamada | Mar 17, 2009 9:24:29 PM

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