Tuesday, July 24, 2018

ABA House of Delegates to Consider Major Changes for Legal Education

The American Bar Association House of Delegates ("HOD"), the body that determines association-wide policy, will review proposals at the upcoming ABA Annual Meeting to change rules and procedures affecting how the ABA accredits the nation’s 204 law schools. The HOD will also consider updates to the model rules governing lawyer-client communications.

The HOD made up of 601 delegates from state, local, and other bar associations and legal groups from across the country. It will meet at the Hyatt Regency Chicago on Aug. 6-7, 2018, at the close of the Annual Meeting, which begins August 2. Altogether, about 50 proposals are on the House’s agenda. The HOD debates are open to observers and may also be available by webcast.

Proposed Changes to the ABA Standards and Procedures to Approve Law Schools

 

The proposed revisions to the ABA Standards and Rules of Procedure for Approval of Law Schools  follows a lengthy review and comment process. The changes will modify not only rules and standards, but the way the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar – the association’s independent arm which serves as the national accreditor of law schools -- operates. Altogether, there are five legal education resolutions (111A-111E) before the House.

For law schools, the most significant proposed change affects the standard requiring a “valid and reliable test” for prospective law students. While a test, such as the LSAT, would no longer be required, language would establish that a school whose admissions policy and practices are called into question is presumptively out of compliance with the standards if it does not require a valid and reliable admissions test as part of its admission policy. In recent years, close to two dozen schools have announced they will accept the GRE in addition to the LSAT.

The Council, which is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as the sole national accrediting agency for law school education, is also seeking to eliminate both its Accreditation and Standards Review committees and fold their work into the Council itself to accelerate its review of schools. Under ABA rules, the House can either concur with the recommended changes or send them back to the Council with or without a recommendation. The Council must then resend any changes back to the House for re-consideration, but the final decision rests with the Council. 

Proposed Changes to the ABA Rules of Professional Responsibility

The lawyer communications proposal culminates several years of work by the ABA Standing Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and affiliated groups, which have shepherded the process for review of model rules related to advertising and lawyer communications with clients.

The standing committee is asking the House to approve amendments to the following ABA Model Rules: 7.1: Communications Concerning a Lawyer’s Services, 7.2: Advertising, 7.3: Solicitation of Clients, 7.4: Communication of Fields of Practice and Specialization, and 7.5: Firm Names and Letterheads.  Proponents contend the current web of complex, contradictory and detailed advertising rules impedes lawyers’ efforts to expand their practices and thwart clients’ interests in securing the services they need.

The key changes focus on model rule provisions related to false and misleading “communications” and solicitations by lawyers. The changes in the ABA Model Rules, which serve as recommended guidelines to state regulators, would streamline and simplify the rules and still adhere to constitutional limitations on restricting commercial speech; protect the public; and permit lawyers to use technologies to inform consumers accurately and efficiently about the availability of legal services. For instance, “office address” would be changed to “contact information” (to accommodate technological advances), and the changes add new language to the general provision against paying for recommendations to permit nominal “thank-you” gifts.

Other Proposed Changes Before the HOD

The House is also being asked to approve a major change in how the ABA collects dues from its members. Under the proposed new membership model, the current 157 price points would be streamlined into five, ranging from $75 to $425 depending on years of bar admittance. Under the plan, the change would take place in the association’s 2020 fiscal year, which begins September 1, 2019.

Other proposals before the House include:

  • Resolution 103, which adopts the ABA Model Impairment Policy for Legal Employers, dated August 2018, to provide a mechanism within law firms to identify impairment and craft proper intervention, and to prevent professional standards and the quality of work for clients from being compromised by any legal employer personnel’s impairment. The resolution also urges legal employers to adopt the new model policy.
  • Resolution 106A, which reaffirms the ABA’s commitment to advance the rule of law and condemns the harassment, arbitrary arrest and detention, arbitrary disbarment, denial of due process, other ill-treatment and killings of judges, lawyers, other members of the legal profession and their extended families throughout the world for serving in their designated capacities.
  • Resolution 114, which adopts the black letter and commentary to the ABA Ten Guidelines on Court Fines and Fees, dated August 2018, and urges governmental agencies to promulgate law and policy consistent with the guidelines, which are intended to minimize excessive penalties if an individual cannot afford to pay them.
  • Resolution 118, which urges the federal government to recognize that service by persons who otherwise meet the standards for accession or retention, as applicable, in the U.S. Armed Forces should not be restricted, and transgender persons should not be discriminated against, based solely on gender identity.
  • Resolution 10A, which asks states to adopt General Provisions for Regulation of Online Providers of Legal Documents to establish reasonable standards of product reliability and efficacy for online legal providers.
  • Resolution 100B, which urges Louisiana and Oregon to require unanimous juries to determine guilt in felony criminal cases and reject the use of non-unanimous juries where currently allowed in felony cases.

All proposed and filed resolutions and reports can be found here. Only proposals adopted by the House constitute association policy.

(Adapted from an ABA Press Release)

(mew)

July 24, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 19, 2018

The John Marshall Law School will Merge with the University of Illinois at Chicago, Creating the First Public Law School in the City of Chicago

UIC and John Marshall Join Forces to Create Chicago's Only Public Law School
 

The board of trustees of both the University of Illinois at Chicago and The John Marshall Law School have voted to create UIC John Marshall Law School—Chicago’s first and only public law school.

"The decision to create a public law school marks a historic day for higher education in Chicago," said Michael Amiridis, UIC Chancellor. "It is also a historic day for UIC, which will fill a 50-year gap in its academic offerings as a comprehensive research university. Through our research and scholarship, we have celebrated and contributed to the rule of law for decades, and now we open the doors of our academic community to those who teach the law and those who study the law. We look forward to welcoming the John Marshall family into UIC."

UIC initiated informal discussions with The John Marshall Law School leadership in 2016. Subsequently, the parties determined that this transaction would be financially feasible without requiring any new state funds. At the closing, significant John Marshall assets will transfer to UIC and the University of Illinois Foundation. The law school's real estate in the Loop will initially be leased and then transferred within five years. UIC will bear no financial obligation for the acquisition and will fully integrate the law school into UIC after the closing.

In addition to providing current and prospective students with a more affordable legal education, UIC's acquisition of John Marshall will create opportunities for interdisciplinary courses and new joint and dual-degree programs aligned with UIC strengths in disciplines such as the health sciences, engineering and technology, urban planning and public administration, the social sciences and business. John Marshall joining UIC will also open up new possibilities for research collaborations between UIC and John Marshall faculty.

"When you combine the strengths of the John Marshall Law School and UIC, one plus one is much greater than two," said Mayor Rahm Emanuel. "The merger of these two bright lights on Chicago's scholastic landscape will strengthen education and career opportunities for generations of Chicago students, and strengthen our city's reputation for world-class academic excellence."

The UIC John Marshall Law School will require accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission and the American Bar Association's Section on Legal Education and Admission to the Bar, and approval for a change of control from the U.S. Department of Education. A law school at UIC is also subject to review and approval by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. If the necessary approvals are obtained within the anticipated timeframe, the first entering class of the UIC John Marshall Law School is expected to matriculate in fall 2019.

"Chicago is the largest city in the U.S. without a public law school. The UIC John Marshall Law School will fill that gap while also enhancing legal services available to the people of Chicago. We are already putting plans in place to enhance the program of legal education, build innovative programs within a strong public university, and continue the law school's long-standing efforts to increase diversity in the legal profession," said John Marshall's Dean Darby Dickerson, who will stay on as dean of the UIC John Marshall Law School.

Both institutions have track records of excellence in research and scholarship, access for underserved students, and service to Chicago and its people. "Our shared commitment in these areas guarantees that the doors of UIC John Marshall Law School will continue to remain open to all aspiring law students regardless of their socioeconomic backgrounds," said Paula Holderman, President of the Board of Trustees of The John Marshall Law School.

"John Marshall has a broad curriculum, an excellent faculty, and a long history of giving back to the community by providing pro bono legal services in the areas of veterans’ affairs, international human rights, fair housing, family law, landlord-tenant issues and more," said Susan Poser, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at UIC. "There are UIC faculty who study these same issues from the perspective of social science, public administration, and health care. We plan to harness these areas of expertise to graduate lawyers who are grounded in and understand the context in which they will practice."

Approximately 900 Juris Doctor (JD) students and 117 Master of Laws (LLM) and Master of Jurisprudence (MJ) students are currently enrolled at John Marshall. The school expects to add a fall 2018 entering JD class of approximately 280.

When the transaction closes, John Marshall students will become UIC students and will have enhanced student services, including access to health care services, recreational facilities, residence halls, and college athletics. UIC students will benefit from access to law courses and opportunities to take classes jointly taught by John Marshall and UIC faculty.

The new UIC John Marshall Law School will continue to operate at its downtown Loop location at the corners of State Street, Jackson Boulevard and S. Plymouth Court and will become the sixteenth college at UIC. The dean will report to the UIC Provost, and John Marshall staff will become UIC employees. UIC also welcomes John Marshall alumni to the UIC community.

Press release from The John Marshall Law School.

(mew)

July 19, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

International Human Rights Clinic Wins Illinois State Bar Association Award

The International Human Rights Clinic at The John Marshall Law School in Chicago has won the 2017 Elmer Gertz Award from the Illinois State Bar Association. The award will be presented to the Clinic this evening at a ceremony in Chicago.

The Elmer Gertz Award recognizes long-standing, continuing, and exceptional commitment by an individual or an organization to the protection or advancement of Human Rights. It is named for Elmer Gertz, a civil rights attorney and former adjunct professor at The John Marshall Law School. He also was the plaintiff in the landmark defamation case of Gertz v. Robert Welch, Inc.

The Illinois State Bar Association established the Elmer Gertz Award in 2000.  The award is designed to honor often-unsung heroes of the legal community who have shown a continued commitment to preserve and advance human rights. For many years, the award was jointly presented by the ISBA and the Blind Services Association.

RuhakThe 2017 recipient of the award is the International Human Rights Clinic at The John Marshall Law School. Pictured here with Blog Editor Mark Wojcik is the Clinic Director, Sarah Dávila-Ruhaak, who will accept the award this evening. The clinic is e a non-profit, non-partisan legal clinic dedicated to the protection of human rights in the United States and around the world. It has advocated for human rights in international and domestic tribunals, provided resources and research on human rights, and engaged in public education and outreach on various human rights issues.

Here is a list of past recipients of the Illinois State Bar Association Gertz Award:

  • 2017 - The John Marshall Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic
  • 2016 - Cindy Buys, Southern Illinois University Law School
  • 2015 - Mary M. McCarthy, executive director, National Immigrant Justice Center
  • 2013 - Jody Raphael, DePaul University College of Law
  • 2012 - Judge Martha A. Mills, Cook County Circuit Court
  • 2009-20011 - Award not given
  • 2008 - Prof. Doug Cassel, Notre Dame University School of Law
  • 2007 - R. Eugene Pincham, Retired Justice, Illinois Appellate Court
  • 2006 - Prof. Michael P. Seng, The John Marshall Law School
  • 2005 - Award not given
  • 2004 - Fay Clayton, Chicago
  • 2003 - Prof. Victor J. Stone, University of Illinois  College of Law
  • 2002 - Prof. Ralph Ruebner, The John Marshall Law School
  • 2001 - Gregory A. Adamski, Chicago

Photo by Karen Cross

(mew)

July 18, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Sheila Slocum Hollis Finishes Three Years as Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress

20180702_010644Sheila Slocum Hollis has finished a three-year term as Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress. She's pictured here with incoming Standing Committee Chair, Professor Mark E. Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago, at the 2018 Burton Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Legal Writing.

Sheila Slocum Hollis is chair of the Washington, D.C. office of Duane Morris LLP, and was the office’s founding managing partner, as well as the founding practice group leader for the firm’s Energy, Environment and Resources Practice Group. She served on the firm’s Executive Committee for more than a decade and the Partners Board for 20 years. Ms. Hollis practices in the areas of energy transactional and regulatory law and international and administrative law before government agencies, Congress, state and Federal courts, and other entities. She focuses on domestic and international energy, water and environmental matters, representing governmental bodies, the power and natural gas industries, and other entities.

Established in 1932 as the American Bar Association's Standing Committee on the Facilities of the Law Library of Congress, with a name change in 1993 to the Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress, the committee serves as the voice of the legal profession concerning the Law Library of Congress (LLC). Over the years, working with Members of Congress and their staffs, the committee has obtained higher levels of funding for the LLC. In addition, collaborating with other nationally recognized professional societies, the committee facilitates efforts to increase Law Library visibility and supports the digitization of legal materials and other efforts that improve access to legal literature and resources. The committee has continued to work toward the development of the LLC as a national resource serving not only Congress but also the legal profession, universities, law schools, and the public.

Professor Mark E. Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School in Chicago will become the new Chair of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress at the conclusion of the ABA Annual Meeting in Chicago this August. He has been a member of the Standing Committee and also previously served on the Advisory Commission to the Standing Committee.

(mew)

July 1, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 30, 2018

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

ASIL-Midwest LogoASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

Carbondale, Illinois, September 7-8, 2018

Call for Submissions by July 15, 2018

Here's a reminder that ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), will co-sponsor its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference this year at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, Illinois on September 7-8, 2018. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chairs Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (ydutton@iupui.edu) by July 15. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September 7 (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it is in an early stage) to workshop attendees no later than August 25, 2018.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chairs by July 15. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

For any questions about papers and presentations, please contact ASIL-Midwest Interest Group Co-Chairs, Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (For questions about conference logistics, contact immediate past-Chair, Cindy Buys (cbuys@siu.edu).

(mew)

June 30, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, June 24, 2018

Internatioanl Panels at the Legal Writing Institute Biennial Conference

The Legal Writing Institute Biennial Conference in Milwaukee on July 11-14, 2018 includes four panels organized by the LWI Global Legal Writing Skills Committee that may be of interest to attendees:
  • Teaching Students (and Ourselves) to Think Globally:  The Why, What, and How of Infusing Transnational Law into the JD Legal Skills Curriculum
    • Rosa Kim
    • Diane Penneys Edelman
    • Susan DeJarnatt
    • Adrienne Brungess
  • Best Practices in Designing Curricula and Teaching LL.M. Students
    • Katherine Brem
    • Lurene Contento
    • John Thornton
  • Understanding Cultural Competency as a Core Lawyering Skill
    • Cara Cunningham
    • Deleso Alford
    • Sha-Shana Crichton
    • Mary-Beth Moylan
    • Sandra Simpson
  • Incorporating Ideas from Applied Linguistics and English Education into the Legal Writing Classroom
    • Lurene Contento
    • Jeremy Francis
    • Alissa Hartig
    • Diane Kraft

Click here for more information about the LWI Conference.

Hat tip to Rosa Kim (Suffolk University Law School)

(mew)

June 24, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 18, 2018

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference Call for Submissions

ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), is co-sponsoring its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, IL on September 7-8, 2018. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chairs Neha Jain or Yvonne Dutton by July 15. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September 7 (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community.  Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group.  Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it is in an early stage) to workshop attendees no later than August 25, 2018.  

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chairs by July 15. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

(cgb)

June 18, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 7, 2018

Traveler IQ Challenge

In 2012, we blogged about a Traveler IQ Challenge Game. The link to that game went dead, but thoughtful blog reader Emily North (who describes herself as an Illustrator, Graphics Designer, and Creator of Worlds) found a new link to the game at https://www.crazygames.com/game/traveler-iq-challenge. Enjoy, particularly if you're trying to avoid grading.

Hat tip to Emily North.

(mew)

June 7, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

ECJ Rules in Favor of Same-Sex Binational Couples

One day after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled narrowly in favor of a baker who refused to create a wedding cake to celebrate a same-sex marriage (ostensibly because the baker did not receive an unbiased hearing in the tribunal below), the European Court of Justice has ruled that the term "spouse" within the meaning of the EU law on freedom of residence for EU citizens and their family members must include same-sex spouses. Although EU member states have the freedom to decide whether to authorize same-sex marriage in their own jurisdictions, they may not obstruct the freedom of residence of an EU citizen by refusing to grant a derived right of residence for a same-sex spouse who is a national of a country that is not an EU member state.

The decision is Coman v. Inspectoratul General, N. C-673/16 (5 June 2018).

(mew)

June 5, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 2, 2018

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

ASIL-Midwest LogoASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

Carbondale, Illinois, September 7-8, 2018

Call for Submissions by July 15, 2018

Here's a reminder that ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), will co-sponsor its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference this year at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, Illinois on September 7-8, 2018. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chairs Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (ydutton@iupui.edu) by July 15. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September 7 (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it is in an early stage) to workshop attendees no later than August 25, 2018.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chairs by July 15. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

For any questions about papers and presentations, please contact ASIL-Midwest Interest Group Co-Chairs, Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (For questions about conference logistics, contact immediate past-Chair, Cindy Buys (cbuys@siu.edu).

(mew)

June 2, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 14, 2018

ABA Reports 1.3 Million Licensed, Active Attorneys in the United States

Newly released survey data from the American Bar Association on the nationwide population of lawyers indicates a total of 1,338,678 licensed, active attorneys in the United States. The total represents a 0.2 percent increase since last year and a 15.2 percent rise over the past decade in number of U.S. lawyers.

The American Bar Association National Lawyer Population Survey is an annual snapshot of the number of licensed practicing lawyers in the 50 states, Washington, D.C., and five U.S. territories. The association compiles this information each year from data voluntarily submitted by state bar associations or licensing agencies that are asked to provide the number of resident and active attorneys as of December 31 of the prior year. Under those parameters, the 2018 survey represents data as of December 31, 2017.

Overall, the 2018 survey indicates a slight gain in the national lawyer population, rising 0.2 percent from 1,335,963 active resident attorneys on December 31, 2016 to 1,338,678 lawyers on the same day in 2017. A look at the 10-year trend in lawyer population also shows modest year to year increases since 2008, culminating in 2018 with an overall 15.2 percent gain in practicing U.S. lawyers over the decade. 

Among other findings from the report, the top five areas with the largest number of active attorneys in residence are New York (177,035), California (170,044), Texas (90,485), Florida (78,244) and Illinois (63,422). The top five areas with the fewest resident attorneys are North Dakota (1,694), Virgin Islands (776), Guam (270), North Mariana Islands (128) and American Samoa (59).

The 2018 data is presented in three tables. The first is a state-by-state listing of the number of resident lawyers with comparable data from the previous year. The next table shows the trend in population over the past 10 years, again organized by geographic area. And the last table offers the total number of lawyers by year from 1878 to present. 

The numbers presented in the 2018 population report reflect the best available data provided to the ABA from the state associations and agencies. The organizations responding to the survey sometimes change their reporting standards. Among the changes affecting the 2018 report, Vermont was not able to provide current data for 2017 so the data from the most recent submission were used (2016). Virgin Islands was not able to provide residency data in 2018 due to Hurricanes Irma and Maria, causing the significant increase in lawyer count. In 2018, Oklahoma removed senior members from the count of active residents (they can still practice but are over the age of 70), causing the significant drop in lawyer count. Each table is footnoted to provide relevant detail on the data submitted by each responding entity.

A full copy of the 2018 survey is located here.

With more than 400,000 members, the American Bar Association is one of the largest voluntary professional membership organizations in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law.

(ABA Press Release)

May 14, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

ASIL-Midwest LogoASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), will co-sponsor its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference this year at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, Illinois on September 7-8, 2018.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. 

(mew)

May 8, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference: Final Reminder of Deadline to Submit Calls for Presentations or to be a Commentator

ASIL-Midwest LogoASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

Carbondale, Illinois, September 7-8, 2018

Call for Submissions by July 15, 2018

ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), will co-sponsor its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference this year at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, Illinois on September 7-8, 2018. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chairs Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (ydutton@iupui.edu) by July 15. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September 7 (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it is in an early stage) to workshop attendees no later than August 25, 2018.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chairs by July 15. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

For any questions about papers and presentations, please contact ASIL-Midwest Interest Group Co-Chairs, Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (For questions about conference logistics, contact immediate past-Chair, Cindy Buys (cbuys@siu.edu).

(mew)

May 8, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

ASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

ASIL-Midwest LogoASIL-Midwest Works-in-Progress Conference

Carbondale, Illinois, September 7-8, 2018

Call for Submissions by July 15, 2018

ASIL-Midwest, an interest group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), will co-sponsor its fifth annual scholarly works-in-progress conference at the Southern Illinois University (SIU) College of Law in Carbondale, Illinois on September 7-8, 2018. The goal is to create a friendly, open conversation about works in progress and to foster a Midwestern United States international law community. To that end, the workshop will include both full drafts and early works in progress.

Those interested in presenting at the conference should send a 500-word abstract to ASIL-Midwest Co-Chairs Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (ydutton@iupui.edu) by July 15. Please also include a sentence about the stage the paper is expected to be in by September 7 (e.g., reasonably complete draft, early work in progress, etc.). Papers may address any International Law topics, and this Call for Submissions is open to everyone in the international legal community. Preference will be given to ASIL members who are also members of the ASIL-Midwest Interest Group. Paper presenters will be asked to circulate their drafts (or a summary of the project if it is in an early stage) to workshop attendees no later than August 25, 2018.

Those interested in serving as a commentator for a paper should also send an email to the Co-Chairs by July 15. Commentators will be asked to prepare five to eight minutes of comments on one or more of the papers. Those interested in presenting are also encouraged to comment on the other papers and should indicate whether they are willing to serve as commentators as well.

ASIL members and SIU School of Law faculty, staff, and students may attend for free. Participants who are not ASIL members or SIU School of Law affiliates will be required to pay a $50 registration fee (includes workshop and some meals) for the conference. Some meals will be provided, but participants are responsible for their own travel and hotel expenses. More details regarding transportation, hotels and other logistics will be provided shortly.

For any questions about papers and presentations, please contact ASIL-Midwest Interest Group Co-Chairs, Neha Jain (njain@umn.edu) or Yvonne Dutton (For questions about conference logistics, contact immediate past-Chair, Cindy Buys (cbuys@siu.edu).

(mew)

May 8, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 5, 2018

China and International Law

Issue 43 of the international law review L'Observateur des Nations Unies will address the theme of "China and International Law." The editors invite proposals for the issue by June 23, 2018. They will respond by July 13, 2018 and final manuscripts will be due no later than November 10, 2018. Send your email to obsnu44@gmail.com.

(mew)

 

May 5, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Registration Now Open for the 2018 WTO Open Forum

Online registration for the 2018 World Trade Organization Public Forum is now open. Under the main theme of "Trade 2030," the Forum's sub-themes will be sustainable trade, technology-enabled trade, and a more inclusive trading system. The Forum will be held at the WTO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, from 2 to 4 October. Visit the WTO website for more information.

(mew)

May 2, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

ABA Section of International Law Conferences in Singapore, Denmark, and South Africa

The American Bar Association Section of International Law will be holding conferences in Singapore (May 10-11, 2018), South Africa (May 21-22, 2018), and Denmark (June 10-12, 2018).

Click here for more information about the conferences and the ABA Section of International Law.

(mew)

April 25, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

U.S. Supreme Court Again Limits Alien Tort Statute Lawsuits Against Foreign Corporations

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that foreign corporations may not be sued in U.S. courts for complicity in human rights abuses committed abroad, unless such lawsuits are explicitly authorized by Congress. The vote was 5-4, with the Court's more conservative justices providing the majority in a plurality opinion authored by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. Click here to read the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Jesner v. Arab Bank PLC.

(mew)

April 25, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Supporting the Law Library of Congress

The Legal Writing Institute and Scribes—The American Society of Legal Writers—have each sent letters congratulating the American Bar Association on passing Resolution 109 at the 2018 Midyear Meeting in Vancouver, Canada. That resolution urges the U.S. Congress “to approve appropriations to the Library of Congress necessary to enable the Law Library of Congress to adequately staff, modernize, and enhance its services, collections, facilities, digital products, and outreach efforts.”

The Law Library of Congress is the largest law library in the world, with approximately three million volumes. Much of its collection is unique and unavailable even in countries where the materials originated. Building and maintaining such a unique and magnificent collection requires trained staff and sufficient resources, including special facilities to store and preserve rare law books. Researchers around the world use this unique collection.

LWI and Scribes also wrote in support of the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress, an entity first established 86 years ago as the Special Committee on Facilities of the Law Library of Congress. Now known as the ABA Standing Committee on the Law Library of Congress, it helps inform the public, bar association members, and members of the legal community about the vast and unique collections of treasures in the Law Library of Congress.

(mew)

April 21, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 20, 2018

Amendments to Rules of the U.S. Court of International Trade

Notice of Amendments to the Rules

On September 19, 2017 and March 20, 2018, the United States Court of International Trade approved amendments to the following Rules that will become effective on April 23, 2018:

Rule 1. Scope and Purpose

Rule 4. Service of Summons and Complaint
Rule 5. Serving and Filing Pleadings and Other Papers
Rule 6. Computing and Extending Time; Time for Motion Papers
Rule 7. Pleadings and Motions
Rule 16. Postassignment Conferences; Scheduling; Management
Rule 26. Duty to Disclose; General Provisions Governing Discovery
Rule 30. Depositions by Oral Examination
Rule 31. Depositions by Written Questions
Rule 33. Interrogatories to Parties
Rule 34. Producing Documents, Electronically Stored Information, and Tangible Things, or Entering onto Land, for Inspection and Other Purposes
Rule 37. Failure to Make Disclosures or to Cooperate in Discovery; Sanctions
Rule 55. Default Judgment
Rule 56.1. Judgment on an Agency Record for an Action Other Than That Described in 28 U.S.C. § 1581(c)
Rule 56.2. Judgment on an Agency Record for an Action Described in 28 U.S.C. § 1581(c)
Rule 73.1. Documents in an Action Described in 28 U.S.C. § 1581(a) or (b)
Administrative Order 02-01 In re Electronic Filing Procedures and Submission of Confidential Information

Technical amendments were also made to Form 21 and the listing of Judges of the Court

A copy of the amendments is available for review at the Court’s website:
www.cit.uscourts.gov
 
(mew)

April 20, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)