Friday, January 29, 2021

Call for Proposals: SIU Law Journal Symposium on Innovations in International Legal Education

The Southern Illinois University (SIU) Law Journal invites proposals for its symposium on “Innovations in International Legal Education During the Pandemic: Breaking Down Physical Barriers and Borders with Technology and Cutting-Edge Teaching Pedagogies.” This symposium will consider the challenges, opportunities, and issues related to changes in legal education due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With an emphasis on international legal education, speakers will consider how legal educators developed innovative teaching pedagogies taking advantage of technology and breaking down physical barriers and borders. The symposium will be held virtually on Friday, April 9, 2021.

SIU Law Journal invite proposals for presentations and papers on a wide range of themes related to this topic. The journal is especially interested in the following general topics: (1) forging international collaborations during the pandemic; (2) teaching advocacy in an online setting; (3) adapting and transforming classroom experiences during the pandemic; (4) adapting and transforming clinical legal education during the pandemic; and (5) finding institutional growth opportunities during the pandemic. They encourage presentations with an international theme, but  are also interested in comparative perspectives. 

The Southern Illinois University Law Journal will consider papers from the symposium for publication in its fall issue.

To submit a proposal: Submit a brief abstract in no more than 250 words to Professor Cynthia Fountaine (cfountaine@law.siu.edu) by February 15, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. Central Standard Time. Abstracts should include a brief description of the proposed presentation along with an explanation about how it fits into the theme of the symposium. Also  submit a current CV or bio along with your proposal.

(cgb)

January 29, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Trump Administration Designates Cuba as a State Sponsor of Terror

As one of the last acts of his administration, President Trump placed Cuba back on the list of states that sponsor terrorism today. The move means that Cuba is ineligible to receive certain financial aid and certain exports from the United States.  According to reports, the move is intended to make it more difficult for the new Biden Administration to return to Obama-era policies that eased restrictions on Cuba. U.S. Secretary of State Pompeo claims the move is in response to Cuba's continued harboring of an American fugitive from the 1970s and its refusal to extradite National Liberation Army members to Columbia.  Secretary Pompeo is quoted as saying that the Trump Administration is intent on: "denying the Castro regime the resources it uses to oppress its people at home, and countering its malign interference in Venezuela and the rest of the Western Hemisphere," (despite that fact that Fidel Castro died in 2016 and Raul stepped down from the presidency in 2018, although he remains part of government).

The United States first placed Cuba on the state sponsor of terrorism list in 1982. President Obama removed Cuba from the list in 2015 in an effort to improve U.S.-Cuba relations. The only other two states currently on the list are North Korea and Syria, nations for which there is more international agreement with respect to their role in terrorism.

The Biden Administration will be able to reverse the policy, but it is likely to take some time.

(cgb)

January 13, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Congratulations to the New Leaders of the International Law Section of AALS

During the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS), the Section on International Law elected its new 2021-22 Officers and Executive Committee Members as follows:

Chair: Hari Michele Osofsky, The Pennsylvania State University – Penn State Law

Chair-Elect: Leila N. Sadat, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law

Secretary: Jason Palmer, Stetson University College of Law

Treasurer: Sahar Aziz, Rutgers Law School

Executive Committee:

  1. Lisa Benjamin, Lewis & Clark Law School
  2. Cindy Buys, Southern Illinois University School of Law
  3. Janie Chuang, American University Washington College of Law
  4. George Edwards, Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law
  5. Craig Martin, Washburn University School of Law
  6. Thomas M. McDonnell, Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law
  7. Victoria Sahani, Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law
  8. Milena Sterio, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University
  9. Mark E. Wojcik, UIC John Marshall Law School

Congratulations to all! Looking forward to some great programming.

(cgb)

January 10, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, January 9, 2021

The International Criminal Court Under 'Assault'

Join a discussion with Cleveland-Marshall Law School Professor Milena Sterio, who is one of the plaintiffs in a lawsuit against the Trump Administration over its sanctions on the International Criminal Court (ICC) and its staff on January 24, at 7 p.m. She will discuss how the U.S. economic sanctions on the ICC unconstitutionally interfere with the free speech rights of the plaintiffs and prevent their work pursuing justice on behalf of victims of war crimes around the world. The program is co-sponsored by the Southern Illinois Chapter of the UNA and the SIU School of Law. Register here.

(cgb)

January 9, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 3, 2021

Your AALS International Law Online Dance Card

AALS LogoThe 2021 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools is that organization's first online annual meeting. This year, law schools could purchase a registration package for all of their faculty, and it seems that most every U.S. law school did exactly that. If you're a faculty member at a U.S. law school, check with your school or the AALS to take advantage of the registration that will be free for you.

Here is a guide to help you negotiate the international law panels that will be offered during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting:

All times are EASTERN STANDARD TIME ZONE. Panels sponsored or co-sponsored by the AALS Section of International Law are in bold. Visit the AALS Annual Meeting Website for more information about each panel and the speakers.

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

2:45 to 4:00 p.m. EST Section on International Human Rights, Co-Sponsored by Comparative Law and Law and Religion: Building Bridges between Secular and Religious Human Rights Communities

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST Section on East Asian Law & Society, Co-Sponsored by Law and South Asian Studies: East Asian Responses to Crises - Pandemics, Trade, Climate, and Beyond

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. EST Section on East Asian Law and Society, Co-Sponsored by Comparative Law: Bridging East-West Divides - The Role of Experts in an Age of Misinformation

12:15 to 1:15 p.m. EST. Section on International Law Networking Session. Network and enjoy informal conversation with colleagues from the AALS Section of International Law.

1:15 to 2:30 p.m. EST. Section on Comparative Law, Co-Sponsored by Africa, Constitutional Law, and International Human Rights: Socio-Economic Rights From a Global Perspective

2:45 to 4:00 p.m. EST. Section on Global Engagement, Co-Sponsored by Teaching Methods, Technology and Law and Legal Education: Virtual Mobility: Innovating and Promoting Global Legal Education in Times of Crisis.

2:45 to 5:30 p.m. EST (extended program): Section on Civil Rights and Poverty Law Joint Program, Co-Sponsored by Comparative Law: Politics, Pandemic, and the Future of Civil Rights and Poverty Law

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST. Section on European Law: Works-in-Progress Panel in European Law

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST. Section on Immigration Law: Works-in-Progress

Thursday, January 7, 2021

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. EST. Section on Intellectual Property: Intellectual Property and Culture

1:15 to 2:30 p.m. EST. Section on Immigration Law: Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST. Section on International Law: Pedagogy Session: How to Pick an International Law Casebook

Friday, January 8, 2021

10:00 to 11:00 a.m. EST. University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law: Reopening International Programs. Discussion of the steps and challenges in reopening international programs. Sign up here: https://mcgeorge.wufoo.com/forms/mcgeorge-global-center-aals-breakfast-rsvp/

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. EST. Section on Islamic Law, Co-Sponsored by International Law and Law and Religion: Islam and the Modern International Legal Order

12:15 to 1:15 p.m. EST. Section on Immigration Law - Networking Session

1:15 to 2:30 p.m. EST. Section on International Law: The United Nations at 75 and the Challenges Facing International Law.  A panel with Hans Corell (Former Under Secretary-General for Legal Affairs and Legal Counsel of the United Nations), Ved P. Nanda (Denver), Hari Michele Osofsky (Penn State Law and Penn School of International Affairs), George Edwards (Indiana McKinney School of Law), Leila N. Sadat (Washington University in St. Louis and President of the American Branch of the International Law Association), and Mark E. Wojcik (University of Illinois at Chicago).

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST. Section on International Human Rights, Co-Sponsored by Comparative Law: New Voices in International Human Rights

Saturday, January 9, 2021

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. EST. Section on Law and South Asian Studies, Co-Sponsored by East Asian Law & Society: Role of Public Health in Trade after the COVID Crisis.

1:15 to 2:30 p.m. EST. Section on Scholarship, Co-Sponsored by Constitutional Law, Comparative Law, and Law and Anthropology: Defining Scholarship in the Twenty-First Century.

4:15 to 5:30 p.m. EST. Section on International Law: New Voices in International Law and International Legal Research Update.

Visit the AALS Website for more information about each of these programs, including the names of speakers and descriptions of each panel.

(mew)

January 3, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA)

Trading began in the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) on January 1, 2021, launching the largest Free Trade Area in the world.

The AfCFTA will cover a market with 1.2 billion people and a combined GDP of $3 trillion. 54 of the 55 African Union member states (all but Eritrea) had signed the agreement establishing the AfCFTA and 33 of those countries have deposited their instruments of ratification.

The agreement will eliminate tariffs on 90% of intra-Africa goods. It is expected to aid in the movement of capital and people between countries. It is also expected to reduce non-tariff barriers by expediting customs procedures.

Click here for more information about the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA).

And here is a video with further information about the AfCFTA.

 

Hat tip to Toyin Umesiri.

(mew)

January 3, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 1, 2021

Best wishes for 2021!

Happy new year

January 1, 2021 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

AALS Section of International Law Programs

AALS LogoThe Association of American Law Schools (AALS) holds its annual meeting next week online. We'll have a full "dance card" of the programs for international and comparative law, but we want to be sure that you save these dates and (Eastern) times for the formal programs sponsored by the AALS International Law Section.

Section on International Law - Networking Session
Wednesday, January 6, 2021 12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. (Eastern Time Zone)

Section on International Law: Pedagogy Session: How to Pick an International Law Casebook
Thursday, January 7, 2021 4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (Eastern)

Section on International Law: The United Nations at 75 and the Challenges Facing International Law
Friday, January 8, 2021 1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. (Eastern)

Section on International Law: New Voices in International Law and International Legal Research Update
Saturday, January 9, 2021 4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ (Eastern)

(mew)

December 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, December 10, 2020

Human Rights Day 2020

December 10 marks the 72nd anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948.

The theme of this year's Human Rights Day is “Recover Better – Stand Up for Human Rights.”  This theme relates to the COVID-19 pandemic and focuses on the need to build back better by ensuring human rights are central to recovery efforts.

As Eleanor Roosevelt said,

"Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home -- so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. [...] Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world."

This year, we all need to work together in our local communities all over the world to fight COVID-19 in a way that ends discrimination and eliminates inequalities and promotes a more sustainable world.
 
(cgb)

December 10, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 4, 2020

Kudos to Int'l Law Prof Blog Founder Professor Mark Wojcik

The Officers and Trustees of the Pound Civil Justice Institute have bestowed the Institute’s 2021 Civil Justice Scholarship Award to International Law Prof Blog founder and editor Prof. Mark Wojcik (UIC-John Marshall), as well as to Prof. Sandra Sperino (Cincinnati) and Prof. Suja Thomas (Illinois).

Professor Wojcik, of UIC John Marshall Law School, is honored for his article, Extending Batson to Peremptory Challenges of Jurors Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity, 40 No. Ill. U. L. Rev. 1 (2019), in which he argues that it is time to extend the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Batson v. Kentucky to all federal and state trial courts, and to prohibit expressly the exclusion of jurors based on their actual or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Professor Sperino, of the University of Cincinnati College of Law, and Professor Thomas, of the University of Illinois College of Law, are honored for their book, Unequal: How America’s Courts Undermine Discrimination Law (Oxford University Press 2017), in which they examine the ways in which courts have impeded private enforcement of anti-discrimination laws through civil litigation.

Congratulations to all the 2021 Awardees!

(cgb)

 

December 4, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Scribes Law-Review Award

Each year, Scribes—The American Society of Legal Writers—sponsors a competition to recognize an outstanding note or comment written by a law student who is associated with a student-edited law review or journal. This award has the distinction of being the only national award in the United States for student authors that places no limitation on subject matter.

Journals may enter year’s competition by submitting an outstanding student note or comment that has been, or will be, published between June 1, 2020, and May 31, 2021. The competition will be judged by the Scribes Law Review Committee. The winning journal and the author of the winning note or comment will each receive a plaque.

Nominations are due by January 15, 2021. To receive a form or for any questions, contact Philip Johnson, the Executive Director of Scribes, at scribeslegalwriters@gmail.com.

(mew)

December 1, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

International Law Association Conference

The 79th Biennial Conference of the International Law Association (ILA) is now underway. Registration is available at http://www.ila2020kyoto.org/registration.html 

The conference is online (making it easier to attend than traveling to Kyoto). The conference will be held from now until December 13. Information about the conference is available at http://www.ila2020kyoto.org/

Hat tip to Houston Putnam Lowry.

(mew)

December 1, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Can U.S. Corporations Be Held Liable Under the Alien Tort Statute?

The U.S. Supreme Court is hearing oral arguments today in a case that may determine whether U.S. corporate entities, in this case Cargill, Inc. and Nestle (a U.S. subsidiary of the Swiss-based company), may be held liable under the Alien Tort Statute (ATS). The plaintiffs are former child laborers who were trafficked from Mali to the Ivory Coast where they were forced to work on cocoa bean farms. The lawsuit alleges that Cargill and Nestle continued to do business with these farmers knowing they used child labor. Cargill and Nestle respond that they have policies in place that forbid the use of child slave labor and have taken steps to prevent it in the supply chain.

In Kiobel, the U.S. Supreme Court held that a lawsuit under the ATS must sufficiently "touch and concern" the United States to survive. One question is whether these facts meet that standard. A second question is whether the U.S. Supreme Court will extend its holding in Jesner shielding foreign corporations from liability under the ATS to also exempt U.S. corporations from ATS suits.  Stay tuned for developments.

(cgb)

December 1, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 30, 2020

Call for Papers: ASIL International Courts and Tribunals Interest Group

The International Courts and Tribunals Interest Group (TILIG) of the American Society of International Law (ASIL) is seeking submissions of works-in-progress for a virtual conference to be held on Friday, February 5, 2021.  Submissions on any topic relating to international courts and tribunals are eligible. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of 500 words or less to the conference host, Professor Stuart Ford (fords@uic.edu) at UIC John Marshall School of Law in Chicago. Proposals must be received by January 15, 2021. Six to eight works will be selected for presentation and the presenters will be notified by January 22, 2021. For more information about the conference format, contact Professor Ford at fords@uic.edu.

(cgb)

November 30, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 22, 2020

U.S. President-Elect Biden Expected to Name Antony Blinken as the Next Secretary of State

The New York Times reports that President-Elect Joe Biden is expected to name Antony Blinken as the next Secretary of State. Mr. Blinken, 58, is a former deputy secretary of state under President Barack Obama who began his career at the State Department during the Clinton administration. The New York Times reports that Mr. Binken's "extensive foreign policy credentials are expected to help calm American diplomats and global leaders alike after four years of the Trump administration’s ricocheting strategies and nationalist swaggering."

(mew)

November 22, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

Call for Papers: Constitutional Law Scholars Forum

The American Constitution Society, Barry University School of Law, and Texas A&M University of Law are teaming up to host the Sixth Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum at Barry University in Orlando, Florida on March 26, 2021. Scholarly proposals on any constitutional law topic at any stage of development are welcome. The deadline for the submission of proposals is December 1, 2020. Abstracts of 300 words maximum and a brief biography should be emailed to the conference organizers by that date: Professor Eang Ngov (engov@barry.edu0); Professor Helia Hull (hhull@barry.edu) and Professor Meg Penrose (megpenrose@law.tamu.edu). (cgb)

November 3, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 31, 2020

What Do You Look For in an International Law Casebook?

AALS LogoWhich of the following factors is important to you (as an international law professor) when you're selecting a casebook or other materials for your course in international law?

  • Academic and professional reputation of the casebook author(s)?
  • Comprehensive coverage of the precise topics you want to cover?
  • Thoughtful organization of the material?
  • Recently published or updated so it's current?
  • Supplement with treaties and statutes?
  • Teachers' manual?
  • Availability in your jurisdiction?
  • Reasonable cost for students?
  • Online supplemental exercises or learning tools?
  • Other factors?

At the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), the AALS Section on International Law will hold a special program for new international law professors on this very practical topic of how to pick a casebook. The speakers will not be themselves be authors of international law casebooks but professors who teach the course and have to select a casebook for their students.

The AALS Annual Meeting was to have been held in San Francisco in January 2021 but like many other national and international conferences it has gone virtual. A virtual makes it possible to invite presenters from across the United States and around the world.We welcome your thoughts in advance about what makes a casebook right for you. Please leave your comments in the comment box (and we'll publish those comments here unless you tell us not to in your comments).

(mew)

October 31, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

New Voices in International Law

AALS LogoSome speaking slots are still available for the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) with the AALS Section on International Law's panel on New Voices in International Law. The AALS Annual Meeting was to have been held in San Francisco in January 2021 but like many other national and international conferences it has gone virtual. A virtual makes it possible to invite presenters from across the United States and around the world. If you're interested in submitting a proposal for the New Voices in International Law panel, please leave your name and contact information in the comment section. Don't worry--we won't publish it! It will just be used to contact you about your possible online participation in the AALS panel.

(mew)

October 31, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, October 26, 2020

Online International Law Weekend a Great Success

The American Branch of the International Law Association (ABILA), in cooperation with the International Law Students' Association (ILSA), held an online version of their annual International Law Weekend (ILW). ILW 2020 included 27 panels that covered a wide array of public and private international law topics and featurrf speakers from across the world. More than 1800 individuals registered from around the world, creating an interesting audience of academics, diplomats, government officials, NGO leaders, students, and business leaders.

Highlights included an Opening Plenary Panel featuring Professor Gian Luca Burci, Ambassador David Scheffer, and Judge Silvia Fernández de Gurmendi discussing our theme of International Law in Challenging Times. Other highlights included a keynote address by Catherine Amirfar of Debevoise and Plimpton, LLP, who is the current President of the American Society of International Law (ASIL). Judge Julia Sebutinde of the International Court of Justice also delivered a half-hour lecture on the work of the court.

Did you miss it? The sessions were recorded and will be available on the ABILA website.

ILW also included breakout networking sessions for women, minorities, young lawyers, and for its various committees, such as the ABILA Committee on Teaching Public International Law.

Click here for more information on the American Branch of the International Law Association.

(mew)

October 26, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, October 24, 2020

Be a Jessup Judge!

Judge registration is open for the 2021 Global Rounds of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Log in to update your profile or register as a judge!

October 24, 2020 | Permalink | Comments (0)