Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Chicago Council on Global Affairs Gets a $5 Million Grant for Its Global Cities Forum

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs announced today it has received a $5 million multi-year commitment from the Pritzker Foundation to support its annual three-day global cities forum. Launched in 2015, the forum convenes civic, business, cultural and academic leaders from around the world to raise provocative questions about the influence of global cities and how they can solve pressing global challenges. The forum, cohosted with the Financial Times, will be named the Pritzker Forum on Global Cities in honor of the commitment made to the Council’s Second Century Campaign. The 2019 Forum will take place June 5-7, 2019.

(mew)

January 16, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 14, 2019

Case Western Names New Directors of Cox International Law Center

Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Law has named a new director and co-director of its Frederick K. Cox International Law Center.

Established in 1991, and funded with a three million dollar endowment, the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center is the hub of CWRU’s international law program.  Michael Scharf has served as the Center’s Director for the past sixteen years.  Since becoming CWRU’s Co-Dean in 2013, Scharf has continued to direct the Center with the assistance of several faculty and staff.  Now CWRU has announced that Steven Petras, a long-time CWRU adjunct professor, has accepted the position of the director of the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center.

Petras, who retired in December as a partner from BakerHostetler, has served as Chairman of the Board of the Cleveland Council on World Affairs, President of the Greater Cleveland International Lawyers Group, Chair of the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association’s International Law Section, and President of the Cleveland World Trade Association. He is currently Chair of the Board of the Council of the Great Lakes Region and US National Director of the Canada-U.S. Law Institute.  

Joining him will be Professor Juscelino Colares, who has taken on the role of co-director. Dr. Colares (PhD, JD) clerked for the Hon. Jean-Louis Debré, Chief Justice of France’s Constitutional Court (2008-09 term) and practiced at Dewey Ballantine, LLP, Washington, DC, where he litigated trade cases before federal agencies, federal courts and NAFTA panels. Colares served last year as the Chair of the University Faculty Senate. He was recently reappointed by the Office of the United Trade Representative to serve on the United States Roster of NAFTA Chapter 19 (Trade) Panelists.  Colares' research has been published in leading peer-review journals, including the American Law and Economics Review, Journal of Empirical Legal Studies, Journal of International Economic Law, Journal of World Trade and Jurimetrics.

The Cox Center’s other officers are Professor Richard Gordon, Associate Director of the Cox Center and Director of the Institute for Financial Integrity, Professor Avidan Cover, who serves as director of the Institute for Global Security Law and Policy, Adjunct Professor James Johnson, who serves as director of the Henry King War Crimes Research Office, and Professor Timothy Webster, who serves as director of Asian Legal Studies.  Dean Scharf will remain involved in the activities of the Cox Center, including as co-coach of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court team which has reached the international rounds seven times in the past fourteen years and won the world championship in 2008.  

(mew)

 

January 14, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Bar Pass Rates and Other Issues Coming Before the ABA House of Delegates

The American Bar Association House of Delegates meets later this month with a full slate of resolutions, including proposals to change the bar passage rate standard for law graduates and another to oppose arming non-security personnel in the nation’s schools.  

The HOD, as the ABA policy-making body is known, meets Jan. 28 at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas at the end of the 2019 ABA Midyear Meeting. Its preliminary agenda has about 30 different resolutions. The HOD consists of 601 delegates from state, local and specialty bar associations and meets twice a year.  

In a significant change, the council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar is asking the delegates to concur with Resolution 105, which would simplify the bar passage standard for the nation’s 203 ABA-approved law schools. The HOD rejected a similar change in 2017 that would require schools to have a bar-passage rate of at least 75 percent within two years for those who sat for the test. Now, schools can meet the passage standard through a variety of ways.  

A study released by the council found that nearly 9 of 10 law graduates who first sat for the bar in 2015 passed it within two years. Under ABA procedures, the HOD can review a change in ABA legal education standards twice but the council can still enact it without HOD concurrence.  

Resolution 106A would put the ABA on record as opposing laws that authorize teachers, principals or other non-security school personnel to possess a firearm in or nearby a pre-K through grade-12 school. The proposal also urges banning public funds for firearms training for teachers, principals or other non-security personnel or for firearm purchases for those individuals.  

Other resolutions range from ensuring the accuracy of criminal records to rescinding the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance immigration policies. They include: 

    • Resolution 107B seeks commitments from legal employers not to require pre-dispute mandatory arbitration of claims of unlawful discrimination, harassment or retaliation based upon race, sex, religion, national origin, ethnicity, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, marital status or status as a victim of domestic or sexual violence. 
    • Resolution 109A urges the U.S. attorney general to rescind the “Zero Tolerance” and “Operation Streamline” policies that mandate the prosecution of all persons alleged to have improperly entered the United States for the first time, a misdemeanor under 8 U.S.C. 1325; end the practice of expedited mass prosecution of immigrants; and allow for an individualized determination in deciding whether to file criminal charges.
    • Resolution 109B urges federal, state, local, territorial and tribal legislatures to define criminal arrests, charges and dispositions that are eligible for expungement or removal from public view by sealing these records; the proposal also sets out a process for individuals to have their criminal records expunged.
    • Resolution 101B recommends enactment of a rule by the highest courts or legislative bodies of all states, territories and tribes charged with the regulation of the legal profession, as well as by all federal courts, providing for a continuance based on parental leave of either the lead attorney or another integrally involved attorney with certain limitations.
    • Resolution 106B asks federal, state, local, territorial and tribal governments to reduce potential harm that individuals may inflict on themselves or others by enacting statutes, rules or regulations allowing individuals to temporarily prevent themselves from purchasing firearms.
    • Resolution 107A urges the federal judiciary, Congress and the Department of Homeland Security to enact legislation and adopt policies to protect the privacy interests of those crossing the border by imposing standards for searches and seizures of electronic devices, protection of attorney-client privilege, the work product doctrine and lawyer-client confidentiality.

The full slate of resolutions can be found here. Resolutions do not become ABA policy until approved by the House of Delegates and are subject to change before then. All ABA policies and procedures can be found in the ABA Policies and Procedures Handbook. 

(Adapted from an ABA Press Release)

January 14, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Reminder: The Journal "Trade, Law, and Development" Seeks Submissions on Trade Facilitation

Trade, Law and Development

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Special Issue on Trade Facilitation

Founded in 2009, the philosophy of Trade, Law and Development has been to generate and sustain a constructive and democratic debate on emergent issues in international economic law and to serve as a forum for the discussion and distribution of ideas. In keeping with these ideals, the Board of Editors is pleased to announce Trade Facilitation as the theme for its next Special Issue (Vol. XI, No. 1).

Trade facilitation is the simplification, modernisation, and harmonisation of international trade procedures. It helps simplify customs procedures by reducing costs and improving their speed and efficiency through a multilateral understanding. The Trade Facilitation Agreement (‘TFA’) entered into force on February 22, 2017 and is one of the first major new agreements reached by the member countries of the WTO since its establishment in 1995. It contains provisions for expediting the movement, release and clearance of goods, sets out measures for effective cooperation between customs and other appropriate authorities on trade facilitation, and contains provisions for technical assistance and capacity building in this area.

There is extensive empirical data to suggest that trade facilitation can significantly boost trade. However, several concerns exist regarding the projected benefits of the TFA, its implementation, and its enforcement in an increasingly protectionist trade environment. There is also uncertainty as to how the TFA will bring uniformity and consistency in the border management of developing and least-developed countries and the role of the Committee on Trade Facilitation in this respect. Moreover, most regional and bilateral preferential trade agreements negotiated in the recent past have incorporated varying provisions related to trade facilitation. It is unclear whether the TFA has been successfully able to achieve broad application of these commitments. These subjects have not received sufficient attention from mainstream academia yet. Consequently, existing literature is inadequate to effectively equip policymakers to deal with such issues.

Alongside this, India has been championing trade facilitation in services at the WTO. Trade in services too faces various barriers at and behind the border, which poses difficulties for service providers from developing countries like India in accessing key markets. India’s proposal focussed on making existing market access meaningful through reduction in transaction costs arising from unnecessary regulation. The proposal received a mixed response. Some Members like China even supported the proposed agreement going beyond the scope of domestic regulation under GATS, while others expressed concerns regarding the need for a separate legal text for trade facilitation in services and the nature and scope of the obligations put forth therein.

This Special Issue, currently scheduled for publication in July 2019, will provide an ideal platform to deliberate on trade facilitation initiatives at the WTO and how they relate to more regional initiatives. Accordingly, the Board of Editors is pleased to invite original and unpublished submissions for the Special Issue on Trade Facilitation for publication as ‘Articles’, ‘Notes’, ‘Comments’ and ‘Book Reviews’.

Manuscripts may be submitted via e-mail, ExpressO, or through the TL&D website. For further information about the journal and submission guidelines, please visit www.tradelawdevelopment.com.

In case of any queries, please contact the editors at: editors[at]tradelawdevelopment[dot]com.

LAST DATE FOR SUBMISSIONS: 15TH FEBRUARY, 2019.

Hat tip to Radhika Parthasarathy, a student at National Law University, Jodhpur, India and Managing Editor, Trade, Law & Development.

January 1, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 29, 2018

Save the Dates: ASIL, ILSA, and ABA-SIL

Annual Meeting of the American Society of International Law, in Washington, D.C., -- March 27 to 30, 2019.

International Rounds of the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. -- March 31 to April 6, 2019.

Annual Conference (formerly known as the Spring Meeting) of the American Bar Association Section of International Law, also in Washington, D.C. this year -- April 9 to 13, 2019.

(mew)

December 29, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 28, 2018

"New Voices" Invited to Speak at ASIL Annual Meeting

Call for Papers – 2019 American Society of International Law Annual Meeting New Voices

From March 27-30, 2019, the American Society of International Law will convene its 113th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.  One of the aims of the 2017 Annual Meeting is to promote a rigorous discussion on the question of "International Law as an Instrument." The Annual Meeting Committee plans to include at least one "New Voices" session that will provide a platform for junior scholars and practitioners to present their works-in-progress.

The Society invites submissions from current students, non-tenured scholars, and junior practitioners on any topic of international law related to the theme of the meeting. Any authors who submitted a paper abstract in the first call for papers and session proposals do not need to submit again; those abstracts remain under consideration. Abstracts should be well developed and reflect advanced progress on a paper that will be presented at the Meeting. Drafts of the papers will be due to the commentator by March 13, 2019. Send your abstract to asilannualmeeting@asil.org no later than Monday, January 21, 2019, with the subject line "New Voices Proposal." Please send the abstract as a Microsoft Word attachment, including your name and contact information (email address & affiliation). Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words. Selected authors will be notified by the beginning of February.

(mew)

December 28, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Global Legal Skills Scholarship and Book Award 2018

Paul Kossof, a U.S.-trained attorney working in Beijing, China, has won the 2018 Global Legal Skills Scholarship and Book Award

He received the Global Legal Skills Scholarship and Book Award in recognition of his books that promote a better understanding of Chinese law and the Chinese legal system. The award was announced at the Global Skills Conference held in Melbourne, Australia, in December 2018.

Chinese Legal ResearchOne of his books is Chinese Legal Research, the first book to provide a condensed guide to legal research in China for foreign researchers who may not speak or read Chinese. The goal of this book is to supply researchers with the background, tools, resources, and tips necessary to conduct effective Chinese legal research without even a basic knowledge of written Mandarin. Click here for more information about the Chinese Legal Research book.

Another of his books explains Chinese Trademark Law. Click here for more information about that book.

More information about the Global Legal Skills Awards is available by clicking here. Awards are given for individual achievement, books and scholarship, institutional awards, and law school awards.

(mew)

December 11, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 10, 2018

Law and Legal Education in Australia

The 13th Global Legal Skills Conference continues this week at Melbourne Law School. A plenary session on Australian law included a detailed explanation of the landmark decision of the High Court of Australia in Mabo v. Queensland (No. 2), [1992] HCA 23; 175 CLR 1; (1992) EOC 92-443; 42 FLR 32. The Mabo decision recognized the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and acknowledged their unique connection with the land. It also led to the Australian Parliament passing the Native Title Act in 1993, a law that provides a mechanism to determine how native title interests are recognized and recorded.

Other topics discussed in the Australian plenary included the Australian Constitution, the contemporary legal structure of Australia and its federal system, and the Australian judicial system.

The speakers at the Australian legal plenary were Professor Kirsty Grover, Mr. Matthew Albert, and Dr. Carrie McDougal, all of the Melbourne Law School.

(mew)

December 10, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, December 9, 2018

Global Legal Skills Conference Opens in Melbourne

The 13th Global Legal Skills Conference opened today in Melbourne, Australia, drawing speakers and participants from 22 countries. The conference is hosted by Melbourne Law School in partnership with The John Marshall Law School in Chicago, where the conference originated. Speakers are sharing teaching materials, techniques, and ideas for legal skills education. As in past conferences, there is a particular emphasis on teaching legal writing and research to lawyers and law students who speak English as a second language. The conference program and information about the presenters can be found by clicking here.

(mew)

December 9, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 3, 2018

REMINDER: Christine Lagarde Lecture on International Relations

Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), will deliver the Kissinger Lecture in Foreign Policy and International Relations. Lagarde will speak about the changing landscape of the international system and the need for continued creativity in U.S. leadership in order to tackle the world’s shared economic challenges.

This event will begin with an introduction by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. Hayden will be followed by Lagarde's keynote address and an interview by Margaret Brennan of Face the Nation on CBS.

The program will be streamed LIVE on Tuesday, December 4, 2018, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Eastern Time (United States)

December 3, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, December 1, 2018

Reminder: The Journal "Trade, Law, and Development" Seeks Submissions on Trade Facilitation

Trade, Law and Development

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Special Issue on Trade Facilitation

Founded in 2009, the philosophy of Trade, Law and Development has been to generate and sustain a constructive and democratic debate on emergent issues in international economic law and to serve as a forum for the discussion and distribution of ideas. In keeping with these ideals, the Board of Editors is pleased to announce Trade Facilitation as the theme for its next Special Issue (Vol. XI, No. 1).

Trade facilitation is the simplification, modernisation, and harmonisation of international trade procedures. It helps simplify customs procedures by reducing costs and improving their speed and efficiency through a multilateral understanding. The Trade Facilitation Agreement (‘TFA’) entered into force on February 22, 2017 and is one of the first major new agreements reached by the member countries of the WTO since its establishment in 1995. It contains provisions for expediting the movement, release and clearance of goods, sets out measures for effective cooperation between customs and other appropriate authorities on trade facilitation, and contains provisions for technical assistance and capacity building in this area.

There is extensive empirical data to suggest that trade facilitation can significantly boost trade. However, several concerns exist regarding the projected benefits of the TFA, its implementation, and its enforcement in an increasingly protectionist trade environment. There is also uncertainty as to how the TFA will bring uniformity and consistency in the border management of developing and least-developed countries and the role of the Committee on Trade Facilitation in this respect. Moreover, most regional and bilateral preferential trade agreements negotiated in the recent past have incorporated varying provisions related to trade facilitation. It is unclear whether the TFA has been successfully able to achieve broad application of these commitments. These subjects have not received sufficient attention from mainstream academia yet. Consequently, existing literature is inadequate to effectively equip policymakers to deal with such issues.

Alongside this, India has been championing trade facilitation in services at the WTO. Trade in services too faces various barriers at and behind the border, which poses difficulties for service providers from developing countries like India in accessing key markets. India’s proposal focussed on making existing market access meaningful through reduction in transaction costs arising from unnecessary regulation. The proposal received a mixed response. Some Members like China even supported the proposed agreement going beyond the scope of domestic regulation under GATS, while others expressed concerns regarding the need for a separate legal text for trade facilitation in services and the nature and scope of the obligations put forth therein.

This Special Issue, currently scheduled for publication in July 2019, will provide an ideal platform to deliberate on trade facilitation initiatives at the WTO and how they relate to more regional initiatives. Accordingly, the Board of Editors is pleased to invite original and unpublished submissions for the Special Issue on Trade Facilitation for publication as ‘Articles’, ‘Notes’, ‘Comments’ and ‘Book Reviews’.

Manuscripts may be submitted via e-mail, ExpressO, or through the TL&D website. For further information about the journal and submission guidelines, please visit www.tradelawdevelopment.com.

In case of any queries, please contact the editors at: editors[at]tradelawdevelopment[dot]com.

LAST DATE FOR SUBMISSIONS: 15TH FEBRUARY, 2019.

Hat tip to Radhika Parthasarathy, a student at National Law University, Jodhpur, India and Managing Editor, Trade, Law & Development.

December 1, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, November 30, 2018

Christine Lagarde Lecture on International Relations

Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), will deliver the Kissinger Lecture in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress on December 4, 2018. The event will be webcast live for viewing around the world.

Ms. Lagarde will speak about the changing landscape of the international system and the need for continued creativity in U.S. leadership in order to tackle the world’s shared economic challenges.

This event will begin with an introduction by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. Dr Hayden will be followed by Lagarde's keynote address and an interview by Margaret Brennan of Face the Nation on CBS.

The program will be streamed LIVE on Tuesday, December 4, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Eastern Time (United States):

Learn more about the Henry A. Kissinger Program in Foreign Policy and International Relations here.

November 30, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 22, 2018

Hague Convention on Child Adoption

The Hague Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption is an international treaty that facilitates intercountry adoptions. The United States signed the Convention in 1994, and the Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008. Click here to read the full text of the Convention.

The Convention applies to all adoptions by U.S. citizens habitually resident in the United States of children habitually resident in any country outside of the United States that is a party to the Convention (Click here for a list of countries that are parties to the Hague Adoption Convention). Adopting a child from a Convention country is similar in many ways to adopting a child from a country not party to the Convention, but there are some key differences.  Click here to read more about the Hague Child Adoption Convention.

(mew)

November 22, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Global Legal Skills Conference in Melbourne

The 13th Global Legal Skills Conference is jointly organized by The John Marshall Law School in Chicago and Melbourne Law School in Australia. It will be held December 10-12, 2018 in Melbourne, with walking tours of Melbourne before the conference on December 9 and a cultural excursion after the conference on December 13.

 

The conference features more than 100 speakers from 20 countries. The conference program can be viewed at https://glsc.jmls.edu/2018/program/ This is the first time that the conference is being held in Australia. (Previous conferences have been held in Chicago, Washington DC, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Italy.)

 

If you are attending the conference, remember to check whether you need a visa to visit Australia. https://glsc.jmls.edu/2018/visas/

 

If you're not attending the conference this year, please join us next year when The John Marshall Law School and Arizona State University School of Law will hold the conference in Phoenix, Arizona on December 12-14, 2019. Information about that GLS-14 conference will be available after we finish the conference in Melbourne, but please save the dates now.

 

(mew)

November 20, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia Convticts Two Former Khmer Rouge Leaders of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity, and Grave Breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949

The Trial Chamber of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) has convicted former senior Khmer Rouge leaders NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan of genocide, crimes against humanity, and grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions of 1949. The crimes were committed at various locations throughout Cambodia during the Democratic Kampuchea period from April 1975 to January 1979.

The Trial Chamber announced a summary of its findings and the disposition in Case 002/02 at a public hearing on November 16, 2018, sentencing the Accused, NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan to life imprisonment.

The Chamber will deliver full written reasons for its judgment at a later date.

Evidentiary hearings in the trial of Case 002/02 commenced with opening statements in October 2014 and concluded in January 2017. The trial, including closing statements, lasted for a total of 283 hearing days. The Trial Chamber heard the testimony of 185 individuals: 114 witnesses, 63 Civil Parties, and 8 experts. The trial was subject to considerable public interest, with 82,780 persons attending the hearings.

The Chamber’s Main Findings

The Trial Chamber found that NUON Chea, Deputy Secretary of the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK) and KHIEU Samphan, the Head of State of Democratic Kampuchea, participated in a joint criminal enterprise together with other senior leaders of the CPK, to implement a rapid socialist revolution, which involved the commission of crimes. NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan were convicted of committing, through participation in a joint criminal enterprise: genocide of the Vietnamese ethnic, national, and racial group; various grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions; and the crimes against humanity of murder; extermination; enslavement; deportation; imprisonment; torture; persecution on political, religious and racial grounds; and the other inhumane acts of attacks against human dignity and through conduct characterized as enforced disappearances, forced transfer, forced marriage, and rape within the context of forced marriage.

Both Accused were also convicted of aiding and abetting the crime against humanity of murder at worksites, cooperatives and security centers for deaths resulting from living conditions at these crime sites, including lack of food, water and medical care as well as the imposition of hard labor. NUON Chea alone was convicted for the crime of genocide by killing members of the Cham ethnic and religious group on the basis of his superior responsibility. The crimes were committed at various crime sites throughout the country, including at the Tram Kak Cooperatives, Trapeang Thma Dam Worksite, 1st January Dam Worksite, Kampong Chhnang Airfield Construction Site, S-21, Kraing Ta Chan, Au Kanseng and Phnom Kraol Security Centres.

NUON Chea was found to have acted as POL Pot’s “right hand,” being involved in all major decisions of the CPK. He played a key role in designing, implementing and disseminating the CPK’s criminal polices and propaganda, for example as principal author of the regime’s propaganda magazine, Revolutionary Flag, and contributed to crimes committed by CPK cadres. NUON Chea was also found to have participated in purges and in the running of S-21 Security Centre.

KHIEU Samphan was found to have encouraged, incited, and legitimized criminal policies and to have contributed to crimes committed by CPK cadres. He personally instructed cadres on implementing criminal policies, and was responsible for training CPK cadres. Furthermore, the Chamber found that KHIEU Samphan contributed to nationwide purges and approved the delegation of the “right to smash” within lower ranks of the CPK. KHIEU Samphan was also responsible for widely-disseminated speeches in support of CPK policies, which the Chamber found contributed to the commission of crimes. Crimes committed – CPK policies

The Chamber found that the CPK established cooperatives and worksites, forcing the population to work in inhumane conditions, without adequate food, clean water, or adequate medical care. Tens of thousands of Cambodians were enslaved and large numbers of them died due to the imposition of these conditions. The Chamber further found that the CPK established security centers in order to identify, arrest, isolate, and execute individuals considered to be enemies by the regime. The wives and children of so-called enemies were likewise executed.

The Trial Chamber also found NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan responsible for CPK policies targeting Vietnamese, Cham, Buddhists and former Khmer Republic officials and their families. The Chamber found that between 1975 and 1976, there was a nationwide policy to expel Vietnamese people living in Cambodia. Specific instances of Vietnamese civilians being killed on a massive scale were also established. Hundreds of Vietnamese civilians and soldiers were killed at S-21 Security Centre after being tortured and subjected to inhumane conditions. Buddhist symbols were destroyed, and monks were forcibly disrobed across various communes. Monks were labeled “worms” or “leeches,” and the use of pagodas for religious purposes was disallowed. Cham religious and cultural practices were banned throughout

Cambodia. Mosques were dismantled and Korans were burnt. Cham people were forced to eat pork and prevented from worshiping and speaking their native language. In addition, the Chamber found that Cham civilians were arrested and killed on a massive scale at the Wat Au Trakuon and Trea Village Security Centres. Khmer Republic officials were also targeted for arrest and killed along with their families.

Finally, the Chamber found NUON Chea and KHEU Samphan responsible for a nationwide policy of identifying individuals to be forcibly married, often to strangers. After group weddings, couples were monitored by militiamen and compelled to have sexual intercourse with their new spouses. CPK cadres took the role of parents in the selection of suitable spouses, forced couples to marry, and to produce children for the purpose of increasing the country’s population.

The Trial Chamber found that 3,865 Civil Parties as well as a large number of additional victims suffered immeasurable harm as a consequence of the crimes of which NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan were convicted. The Chamber therefore endorsed the implementation of 13 reparation projects that recognize the harm suffered by Civil Parties and other victims.

In the first trial concerning the Accused, Case 002/01, NUON Chea and KHIEU Samphan were convicted by the Trial Camber on 7 August 2014 of crimes against humanity in relation to forced movements of the population and sentenced to life imprisonment for those crimes. The sentences of life imprisonment in Case 002/01 were affirmed on appeal. The Trial Chamber merged the life sentences imposed in Case 002/01 and Case 002/02 to form a single life sentence for each of the Accused. On 27 February 2017, the Trial Chamber terminated the proceedings concerning all facts set out in the Closing Order for Case 002 not included in Case 002/01 or Case 002/02.

Click here to see the press release about the court's historic decision.

Adapted from a Press Release from the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia.

 

(mew)

November 20, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 19, 2018

U.N. Security Council Lifts Sanctions on Eritrea

The United Nations Security Council lifted sanctions on Eritrea last week, ending a nine-year period of isolation of the country and rewarding the country's improved relations with neighboring Ethiopia and other countries. The Security Council unanimously voted to end an arms embargo, travel ban, and a freeze on assets held by Eritrea and its political leaders. The sanctions had been first imposed in 2009 after the United Nations determined that Eritrea was arming and training militants who sought to undermine the government of Somalia, although Eritrea itself denied that accusation. For more information, see Carol Morello, U.N. Lifts Sanctions on Eritrea, Ending Nearly a Decade of Isolation, Washington Post, Nov. 15, 2018, at A11.

(mew)

 

 

 

 

November 19, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Early Bird Rate for the AALS Annual Meeting in New Orleans

The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) will hold its 2019 annual meeting in New Orleans from January 2-6, 2019. Early bird registration rates are good until November 14. Visit the AALS Annual Meeting website to see the program and to register.

(mew)

November 11, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Another Lawyer is Murdered in the Philippines

Benjamin Ramos, a founding member of the National Union of People's Lawyers, was murdered on Tuesday as he left his office. The New York Times reported that he was shot three times by men riding on motorcycles. Mr. Ramos had been representing the poor, environmental activists, and political prisoners. His work had angered police and the military. Crusading Philippine Lawyer Murdered, N.Y. Times, Nov. 8, 2018, at A6.

(mew)

November 8, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Short Survey for Arctic Experts

The Arctic Environmental Governance Project at the University of California Irvine continues its program on governance with a study of the need for additional instruments for the environmental future of the Arctic. The project welcomes participation in a short survey. There are many different views on the need for more and different instruments and initiatives. Because this question is one of centrality to policymakers, the Project is soliciting expert thoughts.  

The survey should take about ten minutes.  Click here to take the short survey of your views on the Arctic.

Hat tip to Dr. Joseph F.C. DiMento, Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California Irvine

(mew)

 

November 8, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Globe Editor Recognized for 20 Years of Service

Lewis F. Matuszewich was recognized by the Illinois State Bar Association for twenty years of service as editor of The Globe, the newsletter of the ISBA Section on International and Immigration Law. Lewis is a partner at Matuszewich & Kelly LLP, a law firm located in Crystal Lake, Illinois.

(mew)

November 4, 2018 | Permalink | Comments (0)