Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Immigration Article of the Day: A Justice School: Teaching Forced Migration Through Experiential Learning by Lauren Gilbert

LaurenGilbert

A Justice School: Teaching Forced Migration Through Experiential Learning by Lauren Gilbert, 14 Intercultural Hum. Rts. L. Rev. 129 (2019)

Abstract

The need for committed and competent public interest lawyers has never been greater. We are at a unique juncture in U.S. history where there is both a supply and demand for social justice lawyers. Law schools, however, still fall short in their support and preparation of students who want to be public interest lawyers. Legal education still tends to reproduce social hierarchies, channeling top students into high paying jobs at big firms, with only the very top and most persistent students qualifying for judicial clerkships or a handful of prestigious fellowships. It is vital that students see from Day One of law school that they can use their legal training to make a positive difference in the world, and that throughout their three years of law school they learn the doctrine, develop the litigation skills, and have the kinds of experiential opportunities that will prepare them for this work.

This article demonstrates how experiential learning in law school can prepare students for the practice of law and, if done well, instill in them a life-long commitment to social justice. The success of these efforts ultimately turns on working collaboratively with student leaders with a shared commitment to immigrant justice, winning the support of key people in the administration, and ensuring that the experience for students is both emotionally and intellectually rewarding. Our signature achievement was the Karnes Pro Bono Project. Teams of students have, on three separate occasions, worked side by side with attorneys and staff from RAICES, the Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services, at the Karnes family detention center, assisting Central American parents and children through the credible fear screening process and helping them qualify for asylum and release from detention. Not only have the students acquired a deeper understanding of the legal, political, and practical obstacles to asylum faced by refugees at the border. They have had the deeply moving and transformative experience of meeting with detained families seeking asylum, hearing their testimonials, preparing their statements, counseling them, helping them through the credible fear screening process, and ultimately learning their fates.

KJ

July 17, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Hiring Announcement: LSU Immigration Clinic

LUS

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY, PAUL M. HEBERT LAW CENTER seeks to hire a full-time faculty member with security of position to direct the Immigration Law Clinic as part of LSU Law’s Clinical Legal Education Program. The Immigration Law Clinic is a fully in-house, one-semester, 5 credit clinic in which students represent non-citizens in their defensive proceedings before the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR) and affirmative applications with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Applicants should have a J.D. from an ABA-accredited law school, superior academic credentials, substantial experience in Immigration practice and be admitted and in good standing in a U.S. jurisdiction. Prior clinical teaching experience and fluency in Spanish is preferred.

The Paul M. Hebert Law Center of LSU is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access Employer and is committed to building a culturally diverse faculty. We particularly welcome and encourage applications from female and minority candidates.       

Applications should include a letter of application, resume, references, and teaching evaluations (if available) to:

Melissa T. Lonegrass and Christina M. Sautter
Co-Chairs, Faculty Appointments Committee
c/o Pam Hancock (or by email to phancock@lsu.edu)
Paul M. Hebert Law Center
Louisiana State University
1 East Campus Drive Baton Rouge,
Louisiana 70803-0106

July 10, 2019 in Immigration Law Clinics, Jobs and Fellowships | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Postion Opening: Duke Law School, Immigration Clinic, Supervising Attorney

Duke law

Duke Law School, Immigration Clinic, Supervising Attorney

Duke University School of Law seeks a Supervising Attorney for its Immigration Clinic. The Immigration Clinic, which launches in the spring of 2020, will provide direct representation to noncitizens facing deportation and in their applications for asylum and other forms of protection. The clinic will also engage in policy advocacy, impact litigation, and community education and outreach.

The Supervising Attorney will assist the clinic’s director in supervising and monitoring the work of the students in direct representation and advocacy projects, co-teach the clinic seminar, handle matters relating to the day-to-day administration of the clinic law office and its cases, and assume primary responsibility for cases that begin outside of or are not concluded during the academic year.  In addition, the successful candidate may have the opportunity to pursue other interests, such as non-clinical teaching in Duke Law’s curriculum and/or related research.

We expect that the Supervising Attorney will be considered for a full-time, 12-month appointment.  The specific terms of this appointment will be based on the successful candidate’s experience and interests.

Qualifications: J.D. degree from an A.B.A. accredited law school is required. Applicants must be licensed to practice law in at least one state (whether North Carolina or another state). Applicants must also have three or more years of practice experience in immigration law, including representation of noncitizens in removal proceedings. Preference will be given to applicants with:

  • eligibility for admission in state and federal court in North Carolina;
  • experience in federal court immigration litigation;
  • fluency in Spanish; and
  • a strong academic record, exceptional writing ability, and a demonstrated commitment to public interest law and clinical teaching. 

Duke University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer committed to providing employment opportunity without regard to an individual's age, color, disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, national origin, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status.

Duke aspires to create a community built on collaboration, innovation, creativity, and belonging. Our collective success depends on the robust exchange of ideas-an exchange that is best when the rich diversity of our perspectives, backgrounds, and experiences flourishes. To achieve this exchange, it is essential that all members of the community feel secure and welcome, that the contributions of all individuals are respected, and that all voices are heard. All members of our community have a responsibility to uphold these values.

* * * * * * *

Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest, résumé, and the contact information for three professional references at https://academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/13938.  Please submit your materials as soon as possible; the initial review of applications will begin August 31, 2019.

Please share this announcement with those who might be interested.  Questions about the position may be addressed to Kate Evans, Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Immigration Clinic: evans@law.duke.edu; 612-850-5340.

KJ

July 2, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 1, 2019

Position: Immigrants’ Rights and Human Trafficking Program: Boston University School of Law

Bu

Immigrants’ Rights and Human Trafficking Program:  Boston University School of Law

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, a top-tier law school with an international reputation, is a community of leading legal scholars, teachers, students and alumni, dedicated to providing one of the finest legal educations in the world. Since our doors opened in 1872, we have welcomed qualified men and women, without regard to background or belief. The breadth and depth of our curriculum, especially our clinical program, as well as our innovative spirit are distinctive in American legal education.

Boston University is seeking exceptionally qualified and experienced candidates for a full time Clinical Professor/Clinical Associate Professor position in its Immigrants’ Rights and Human Trafficking Program (the “Program”). This is a non-tenure track clinical faculty position with a projected start date of July 1, 2020.

The Program’s mission is to provide law students with the skills and knowledge needed to engage in zealous representation of victims of human trafficking, asylum seekers, unaccompanied minors, and noncitizens facing removal from the United States. Under the direction of clinical faculty, BU Law students provide pro bono legal services in immigration court and before U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. In addition, students advise, counsel, and represent human trafficking victims in a variety of settings, including in law enforcement interviews, district court, and before administrative agencies.

The Clinical Professor/Clinical Associate Professor will be responsible for supervision of students engaged in direct representation of noncitizens applying for asylum, special immigrant juvenile status, and/or other humanitarian relief; co-teaching with the Clinic Director in the fall semester and will teach the Advanced Immigrants’ Rights Clinic seminar in the spring semester.

Additionally, the Clinical Professor/Clinical Associate Professor will work on a range of research and writing projects, which may include appellate briefs and policy advocacy with the students and Program Director. The Clinical Professor/Clinical Associate Professor will be based at Boston University School of Law with an additional office downtown at the Boston University office within Greater Boston Legal Services.

Required Skills:

The ideal candidate for this position is a member of the Massachusetts bar or is eligible for bar membership, with at least three years of immigration law experience with a focus on removal defense. Excellent writing and editing skills, and organizational and managerial skills are required. Teaching and supervision experience are preferred.

Spanish language ability is preferred.

Candidates should have excellent academic credentials, superior research and writing skills, a strong commitment to public interest lawyering, outstanding interpersonal skills, flexibility, a sense of humor, and a passion for direct service immigration and asylum work. The ability to work sensitively with a diverse population of clients, students, and staff is essential.

Boston University School of Law is committed to faculty diversity and welcomes expressions of interest from diverse applicants.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

How to Apply:

DO NOT APPLY USING THE BUTTONS BELOW.

Applicants should send a letter of interest and a resume before December 1, 2019 to the Faculty Appointments Committee at Boston University School of Law, 765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215. Email applications are encouraged and should be sent to lawappts@bu.edu. All open faculty positions are pending budgetary approval.

To learn more about the law school, visit our website at www.bu.edu/law.

KJ

July 1, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 27, 2019

The Plight of Disappeared Migrants from Central America

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A forthcoming report from the International Human Rights Clinic examines the reasons why so many Central Americans head north, why thousands of them go missing each year, and what regional governments can do to help solve the problem.

A soon-to-be published report from Boston University School of Law’s International Human Rights Clinic draws on four years of field research.  The report, The Plight of Disappeared Migrants from Central America, examines the social, economic, and political conditions behind people’s decision to leave their home countries; the reasons migrants disappear en route; and the laws and policies governing investigations, repatriation of remains, and reparations. Professor Susan M. Akram says her clinic agreed to examine the issue at the request of advocates on the ground, including the family members of missing or disappeared people. According to the Movimiento Migrante Mesoamericano (Mesoamerican Migrant Movement), between 72,000 and 120,000 migrants went missing between 2006 and 2016.

KJ

June 27, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Seton Hall Law School Center for Social Justice Seeks Practitioner in Residence for New Immigration Project

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Seton Hall University School of Law has an immediate opening for a full-time experienced immigration attorney to serve as a Practitioner in Residence in its Center for Social Justice, Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic.  This is a year-round position with an initial one-year appointment, renewable for an additional year contingent on funding.   

The Center for Social Justice is home to the Law School’s vibrant clinical program including: civil litigation; criminal defense and reentry; equal justice; family law; health justice; immigrants’ rights/international human rights; and impact litigation.  In addition, the Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic is part of the new Detention, Deportation, and Defense Initiative (DDDI) funded by the state of New Jersey to increase levels of legal representation for detained immigrants.  With support from the Essex County Board of Freeholders, we now seek to hire an additional Practitioner in Residence to expand legal representation for detained immigrants at the Essex County Correctional Facility.  The Practitioner in Residence will represent detained immigrants before the immigration court and Board of Immigration Appeals.  The Practitioner in Residence will work with Professors and Practitioners in the Immigrants’ Rights/International Human Rights Clinic, along with a dedicated paralegal and student externs.

Position requirements:

  • A J.D. and membership in a bar of any state (NJ bar membership is a plus, though not required)
  • At least 3 years’ experience in immigration law
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team
  • Strong written and oral communication skills
  • Strong preference for bilingual English/Spanish applicants

This is a full time, 12-month position. The salary is $80,000 plus excellent benefits through Seton Hall University. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, but interested candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, and list of three references no later than July 10, 2019 to Professor Lori A. Nessel, Director of the Center for Social Justice, at lori.nessel@shu.edu.

KJ

 

June 27, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

FLORES PLAINTIFFS SEEK TEMPORARY RESTRAINING ORDER AND CONTEMPT ORDER AGAINST CBP FOR MIGRANT CHILDREN'S DEATHS AND SEVERE MALTREATMENT AS CRISIS AT BORDER PATROL FACILITIES GROWS

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PRESS RELEASE

The Flores Settlement agreement we reached in 1997 with the Government sets the national standards for the humane treatment and prompt release of children in immigration custody nationwide. The case is now captioned Flores v. Barr in the federal court in Los Angeles.
 
Over the past two weeks, under the authority of the Flores settlementvolunteer monitors (lawyers and doctors) under the director of the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, visited and interviewed hundreds of children at border patrol facilities in Texas. They found that children were being warehoused in deplorable, life-threatening conditions -- overcrowded, unsanitary, unhealthy, and severely traumatizing. President Trump has called the Flores Agreement and the federal judge overseeing its implementation, a "disaster," but it is the Flores Agreement that has enabled the world to see how the U.S. government is brutalizing these vulnerable children.

Today, the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law and co-counsel are filing an emergency request for a Temporary Restraining Order and a Contempt Order against CBP in federal district court, demanding that CBP immediately start processing children for release to parents and relatives as required by the Flores settlement, and to provide them with basic necessities including adequate food, clean water, medical care, and access to sleep. The TRO further demands immediate, unfettered access of medical experts to the facilities, to evaluate and treat the children.
 
Class Counsel Peter Schey stated: "The 80 declarations of class members we have gathered over the past two weeks and are filing in court today disclose that they are detained in what they call 'hieleras,' or 'iceboxes,' or in cages, under appalling, overcrowded, and unsanitary conditions which has caused a health crisis for class members and the deaths of several children. The conditions described in class members' declarations disclose a pattern and practice of neglect and utter disregard for the health and well-being of children in CBP's care and custody. Several class members have recently died in CBP custody. These deaths may have been prevented had CBP simply complied with the terms of the Flores Settlement and promptly released children to their relatives and provided safe and sanitary detention conditions for all children in its custody. President Trump may want to cause chaos at the border to win re-election, but letting children become sick and die should be a practice he stops immediately."
 
To volunteer to visit detention facilities and interview detained children, or to make a donation to support this work, please register at www.reunify.org
 
A copy of the TRO is available here
Excerpts of the children's statements is available here.
The Proposed Order is available here.

Co-counsel working with the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law on the Flores case include USF School of Law Immigration Clinic; Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP; La Raza Centro Legal, Inc.; The Law Foundation of Silicon Valley; National Center for Youth Law; and U.C. Davis School of Law.

Peter Schey
President
Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law

KJ

June 27, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Job Posting Rutgers Law: Research Associate Immigrants Rights Clinic

Rutgers

The Immigrant Rights Clinic at Rutgers Law School in Newark, New Jersey, is seeking to hire an experienced attorney in a full-time Staff Attorney position. Depending on the candidate’s level of experience, the position could be classified as a Senior Staff Attorney position. The start date is flexible, but will ideally be before the start of the fall semester in mid-August 2019. The attorney will work with Professor Anju Gupta, Director of the Immigrant Rights Clinic, as well as other attorneys in the clinic.  

This is a full-time, year-round position. The position is not term-limited and will be ongoing, contingent on funding being renewed. The salary is commensurate with experience, but will be at least $80,000, plus excellent benefits through Rutgers University. The Immigrant Rights Clinic is housed at Rutgers Law School in Newark, a short train ride or drive away from New York City. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, but interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume no later than July 10, 2019. The cover letter should address all of the position requirements listed above. To apply, go here.

KJ

June 25, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Clinical Position at Tulsa Law – Visiting Clinical Professor for Immigrant Rights Project

Tulsa

The University of Tulsa College of Law is seeking a visiting professor to teach its Immigrant Rights Project for the 2019-2020 academic year. Our Immigrant Rights Project is a one-semester clinic in which students represent noncitizens in immigration matters, conduct legal consultations with ICE detainees in our local jail and participate in local and national advocacy projects. The visiting professor would teach the seminar component of the Immigrant Rights Project and supervise participating law students. More information about TU’s Clinical Education Program can be found here.

Interested applicants must hold a J.D. degree from an ABA accredited law school, be admitted and in good standing in a United States jurisdiction, and have clinical teaching -- including participation in a clinical teaching fellowship -- and immigration law practice experience. This is a full-time position, not suitable for those intending to simultaneously engage in full-time law practice.

To apply, please send a letter of interest, curriculum vitae, including references, and a writing sample to Prof. Mimi Marton, mimi-marton@utulsa.edu. Review of applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. To ensure full consideration, applications and supporting documents should be received no later than June 30, 2019.

TU is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access Employer and is committed to building a culturally diverse faculty. We particularly welcome and encourage applications from female and minority candidates.

KJ

June 19, 2019 in Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Notes from the AALS Clinical Conference

Guest Blogger: Liz Keyes, University of Baltimore

More than 700 clinicians gathered in San Francisco earlier this week at the AALS Annual Clinical Conference, and immigration shone front and center in so many ways.

Recognizing Extraordinary Advocacy: Sarah Rogerson

First, the incomparable Sarah Rogerson, director of the Immigration Law Clinic at Albany Law School, won the 2019 M. Shanara Gilbert award, one of the most prestigious recognitions the clinical community gives (Sue Bryant writes beautifully about Professor Gilert, and the award, here).  Sarah won for many reasons, but one of the most immediate was her creation and leadership of a network to rapidly respond to family separation in New York State. With her expertise, her tenacity, and a huge well of good will to draw from after many years of working with partners in New York and beyond, Sarah summoned partners ranging from other law schools to the Albany County Sheriff to serve hundreds of affected immigrants in the summer of 2018—emphasis on summer, not a time of year clinicians can easily access law students to amplify our efforts.

In Sarah’s acceptance speech, she shared credit with those other clinicians, and brought the chatty, noisy, large room to a hushed stillness when she shared her meditation on the phrase dum spiro spero,* While I breathe, I hope.

Sarah Rogerson

While I Breathe, I Hope: Immigration Clinicians in Polarized Times

Sarah’s meditation manifested itself in the Immigration Clinician gatherings during the conference, in working groups, and in concurrent sessions. As always, the groups reminded us of our shared fights and our shared victories. There was plenty of gallows humor, and also recognition of the many ways that we do keep breathing and hoping. There is a resilience to this community that is deep and inspiring. We discussed the extra challenges our colleagues in under-resourced areas like Louisiana face in handling all the demands created by the injustices that seem to only get larger by the day. We offered concrete suggestions for networks that could help with specific issues or tools. We recognized the clinicians doing great policy and litigation work on important issues that are in the news, and also appreciated the slower, steadier value of teaching our students to be excellent lawyers as they step into the work for themselves. In these times, it can be hard to summon the strength to go back into the ring for another round of fights, and yet we do—because while we breathe, we hope.

Mujeres Unidas y Activas

The Clinical Legal Education Association Per Diem Project always designates an organization in our host city to receive funds from the attendees’ per diems. This year, CLEA raised over $5,000 for Mujeres Unidas y Activas, a San Francisco organization supporting Latina immigrant empowerment and organizing. Maria Jesus de Jimenez spoke of how this group grew from a handful of participants to several hundred women who go on to do trainings, outreach, run support groups, and advocate for justice. Ms. Flores spoke about the host of interconnected issues that affect immigrant women, and provided a powerful example of women’s agency in responding to those injustices.

Immigration Professors Taking Center Stage

Many of the concurrents featured immprofers, as well. The list below captures most of what we collectively did (preemptive apologies to anyone inadvertently left off this list).

Pedagogy and Clinic Design

  • Saba Ahmed (UDC), Anne Schaufele (American), and Susannah Volpe (Seton Hall), with the arguably best named concurrent session: I Just Met You, And This is Crazy, But Here’s My Number, So Call Me Maybe: Developing Student Attorney-Client Relationships and Communication from Afar
  • Cori Alonso-Yoder (American) and Jayesh Rathod (American): Lawyer as Truth Teller? Narrative and Fact Investigation in the Shadow of Alternative Facts
  • Sameer M. Ashar (UCLA) and Deborah Archer (NYU), Moving Beyond the Traditional Big Case versus Small Case Debate: Embracing Opportunities to Engage Students in Transformational Advocacy
  • Caitlin Barry (Villanova) and Chris Lasch (Denver), Cultivating Empathy as a Crucial Lawyering Skill
  • Gillian Chadwick (Washburn), Forging Clinic Collaborations with Non-Legal Partners: How Working Alongside Non-Lawyers Advances Student Learning
  • Valeria Gomez (U Conn) and Karla McKanders (Vanderbilt), Red–Bottom Shoe Activism: Privilege, Power, and Pedagogy
  • Hemanth Gundavaram (Northeastern) and Emily Robinson (Loyola LA), Prioritizing Learning Outcomes Using Deliberate Immigration Clinic Design
  • Jean Han (American), Healing and Reconciliation: The Clinic’s Role in Re-Imagining Power and Fostering Dignity in a Time of Polarization
  • Lindsay Harris (UDC), Erica Schommer (St. Mary’s), Sarah Sherman-Stokes (BU), Cindy Zapata (Harvard), Learning in Baby Jail: Lessons from Law Student Engagement in Immigration Detention Centers
  • Luz E. Herrera (Texas A&M), Annie Lai (UC Irvine), Access to Law and Justice
  • Liz Keyes (Baltimore), Meeting at the Intersection of Scholarship and Clinical Practice
  • Hiroko Kusuda (Loyola NoLa) and Michael Vastine (St. Thomas FL), Quickly! Society has Lost its Filter, Should We Teach with One?
  • Jennifer Lee (Temple) and Ragini Shah (Suffolk), Teaching About Racial and Economic Justice in the Age of Trump
  • Vanessa Merton (Pace), Will Bar Admission Standards Promote Adequate Legal Education in Practice Skills, Professionalism and Values for Tomorrow’s Lawyers? Lessons from New York
  • Nickole Miller (Baltimore), Helena Montes (Loyola LA), Emily Torstveit Ngara (Hofstra), Gumming Up the Wheels of Injustice
  • Christine Natoli (Hastings) and Elissa C Steglich (Texas), The Learning Legal Interviewing & Language Access Film Project
  • Sarah H. Paoletti (Penn) Teaching Law Students to Address Issues of Race and Privilege as Part of Professional Competence
  • Michele R. Pistone (Villanova) Using Clinic Case Management Database Systems to Support Access to Justice and Individual Student Learning Outcomes
  • Anita Sinha (American), Direct Client Services and Law Reform – Clinics Tackling Two Big Jobs

Scholarship

  • Julie Dahlstrom (Boston University)
  • Danielle Jefferis (Denver)
  • Danielle Kalil (Michigan)
  • Becky Sharpless (Miami)

And finally, a shout-out to our fearless cat-herding immigration working group leaders:

  • Debbie Gonzalez (Roger Williams)
  • Mary Holper (BC)
  • Carmen Maria Rey (Brooklyn)
  • Linda Tam (UC Irvine)

* Sarah self-deprecatingly noted she does not usually meditate on Latin phrases. However, this guest-blogger notes that she reads political philosophy for fun, and perhaps Professor Rogerson is being an unreliable witness.

 

May 9, 2019 in Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, April 27, 2019

ICE is holding $204 million in bond money, and some immigrants might never get it back

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Meagan Flynn for the Washington Post reports that the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is holding on to more than $200 million in bond money that belongs to immigrants who have been in the agency’s custody, cash that has yet to be returned to thousands of immigrant families or the U.S. citizens who bailed them out, according to data obtained through open records requests.  

The unreturned bond money stood at $204 million as of July 31, 2018, according to the data, which immigration law clinics at Stanford University and the University of California at Davis. The pot of immigrant bond money grew by $57.3 million between September 2014 and July 2018, the data shows.  More than 18,000 bond payments went unclaimed in that four-year period, according to the data.

For more details about the report, click here.

KJ

April 27, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, March 24, 2019

Law School Immigration Clinics file suit in support of activist

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News from Miami!

The University of Miami Law School’s Immigration Clinic, along with a coalition of immigrant rights organizations, filed a lawsuit in the Southern District of Florida, seeking release and a stay of deportation for immigrant rights activist Claudio Rojas.  Rojas was featured in the documentary film, “The Infiltrators,” which is critical of the U.S. government's immigrant detention policies.

According to the lawsuit, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detained Rojas on February 27 when he appeared for a routine immigration appointment. His abrupt detention came at the heels of the Sundance Film Festival premiere of the film, “The Infiltrators,” which features Rojas’s activism and criticism of ICE detention policies.

The case, Rojas v. Moore, is awaiting a decision on an emergency motion before Judge James Lawrence King.  ICE is poised to deport Rojas as soon as March 30. An emergency request for a temporary stay and release order is pending.

“ICE’s power is not limitless,” said Professor Rebecca Sharpless, director of the Immigration Clinic, who argued the emergency motion. “When ICE rushes to deport someone without following the law, courts must act. The stakes are just too high.”

 “The rule of law in this country includes, first and foremost, the Constitution,” said Alina Das and Jessica Rofe of the New York University Immigrant Rights Clinic, co-counsel on the suit. “ICE is not above the law. The First Amendment protects activists like Claudio from being targeted for detention and deportation because they speak out. No one wants to live in a country where the government can so easily silence dissent.”

KJ

March 24, 2019 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 14, 2018

Fall 2019 Immigrants’ Rights Litigation and Advocacy Fellowship Opportunity Stanford Law School Immigrants’ Rights Clinic

Stanford

The Immigrants’ Rights Clinic (IRC) at Stanford Law School invites third-year law students and recent law graduates to apply for a new Immigrants’ Rights Litigation and Advocacy Fellowship. The Fellow will participate in all aspects of the Clinic’s litigation and advocacy docket, including representing immigrants facing removal and cutting-edge work to address recent enforcement practices, but will not participate in the supervision and teaching of law students. The fellowship will be for a two-year fixed-term period, starting in Fall 2019.

The Fellow will report directly to Professor Jayashri Srikantiah (Director of the IRC). The Fellow will work collaboratively with Professor Srikantiah, Lisa Weissman-Ward, Clinical Supervising Attorney, and Erika Madriz, Legal Assistant. Professor Srikantiah is a national expert in immigration law and immigrants’ rights advocacy. She is known to be a dedicated mentor and supervisor of junior public interest attorneys. The Fellow will receive excellent training and supervision as well as access to a national network of immigrants’ and civil rights practitioners and organizations.

Clinic Docket

The Immigrants’ Rights Clinic has a broad-ranging, complex, and multi-modal docket. The IRC Fellow will participate in:
● representation of individual clients in a variety of matters, including immigration court proceedings (detained and non-detained) on behalf of noncitizens with criminal convictions, applications to secure status for noncitizen survivors of domestic violence, and asylum cases;
● litigation of immigrants’ rights cases in the federal courts, including habeas petitions on behalf of detained noncitizens, appeals in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and other federal courts of appeals, and other impact litigation on behalf of noncitizens challenging Department of Homeland Security policies; and
● advocacy on behalf of immigrants’ rights organizations in a variety of areas, including advocating for immigrants in detention, working alongside local organizations in grassroots organizing, developing and distributing know-your-rights materials, legislative and regulatory advocacy, international human rights advocacy, and enabling immigrants’ rights groups to access legal services.

Position Requirements

Applicants for the Fellow position must have:

● a demonstrated commitment to working in immigrants’ rights;

● strong academic credentials;

● excellent legal research and writing skills;

● commitment to close attention to detail;

● ability to multi-task effectively;

● deep inter-personal skills; and

● excellent teamwork skills.

Spanish language fluency is a strong plus factor. The Fellow should either be a member of the California Bar or plan to take the bar exam prior to commencing the fellowship.

The salary is based on a formula that is competitive with similar positions in nonprofits. The Fellow will also be eligible to elect medical and other benefits – found here https://cardinalatwork.stanford.edu/benefits-rewards/health. If the Fellow is a Stanford Law graduate, they will also be eligible to participate in the law school’s Loan Repayment Assistance Program.

About the Mills Legal Clinic

The IRC is one of ten clinics comprising the Mills Legal Clinic. Mills Legal Clinic attorneys are part of the intellectual community within the clinical program and the Law School and university at large. The clinic provides resources for its lawyers to participate in continuing education and other professional development activities.

Application Process

Applicants should submit the following materials:
● a cover letter;

● a resume;

● a list of at least three references;

● a complete law school transcript; and

● a sample brief or legal memorandum that the applicant authored (without substantial editing by others).

Applicants must both: (1) upload the materials to http://careersearch.stanford.edu/ Job Number: 80840 and (2) email the materials electronically to Judy Gielniak, the Mills Legal Clinic associate director, at jgielniak@law.stanford.edu, and to administrative associate, Leti Trejo, at ltrejo@law.stanford.edu.

Applications will be considered on a rolling basis until the position is filled, with the expectation that interviews will begin in Fall 2018 and conclude by the end of the calendar year. The position begins in Fall 2019.

KJ

October 14, 2018 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 17, 2018

Millions of Frequent Flier Miles Are Donated to Reunite Families Separated at Border

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Jacey Fortin in the New York Times reports on how a tweet led to an avalanche of support for migrant families separated at the border.  On the morning of August 6, law professor Beth Wilensky at the University of Michigan tweeted about a family that had been separated by immigration authorities after crossing into the United States. “I came back and checked my Twitter feed and said, ‘Oh my goodness,’” Ms. Wilensky recalled. Her post was blowing up, on its way to getting tens of thousands of retweets.

The tweet said: “My husband travels a lot. Downside: he’s gone a lot. Upside: frequent flier miles. We just used some to fly a 3-yr-old and his dad, who had been separated at the border, from Michigan (where the son had been taken) to their extended family. DM me if you have miles to donate.”

In her responses, Ms. Wilensky included a link to Miles4Migrants, a two-year-old group that uses donated frequent flier miles to transport refugees to new homes or to reunite families divided by conflict.  On that Monday alone, Miles4Migrants received pledges of over one million miles. That number has now ballooned to more than 28 million.

Miles4Migrants grew out of a Reddit group dedicated to “credit churning,” a risky practice that involves systematically signing up for credit cards to win bonuses and points to cover airfare and hotel costs, and even to get cash back. It is a time-consuming and “dorky” hobby, said Seth Stanton, a founding member of Miles4Migrants, which coalesced after one member of the Reddit group, Nick Ruiz, shared a story about using his air miles to help reunite a Pakistani family.

KJ

August 17, 2018 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Immprof 2018: Immigration Law In, Through, and Beyond Moments of Distress

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Drexel University's Thomas R. Kline School of Law is located in Philadelphia, PA

The 2018 Immigration Law Scholars and Teachers Workshop will take place at Drexel Law School from May 24-26, 2018. This year's theme is: Immigration Law In, Through, and Beyond Moments of Distress.

Registration is now open at this link. Register by April 15 to secure the early-bird rate!

The conference has a slew of fabulous opportunities:

  • Media training (separate registration, $30)
  • Clinical Workshop -- including discussion of Law Clinics in a Time of Crisis, Clinic Expansion and Fundraising, Responding to Urgency and Emergency, The Clinic Seminar, Scholarship, Your Hardest Supervision Moments: A Reflection and Debrief Session, and Our Roles as Educators Beyond the Clinic.
     
  • Additional plenary sessions on making research relevant; immigration history; local/regional perspectives; race, exclusion, and national security in the age of Trump; and teaching immigration law in a time of “crisis”
  • More breakout sessions: Addressing and Supporting Students Facing Personal/Family Trauma; Teaching During Divisive Times; International and Comparative Perspectives
  • Music Making
  • Meals
  • Fun

Register today!

-KitJ

 

April 10, 2018 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics, Teaching Resources | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 12, 2018

Northeastern Law's Immigrant Justice Clinic

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Northeastern Immigrant Justice Clinic is up and running. The clinic is now is bustling with activity, as students conduct research for their clients seeking asylum in the U.S., draft legal briefs, and meet with their faculty supervisors in small groups to discuss the intricacies of immigration law.

The students represent the clinic’s first cohort, which began its work in November at the start of the winter quarter. The Immigrant Justice Clinic is the newest of the law school’s clinics that, collectively, provide justice and resources to people in transformative ways.

A new report released in early March by the Immigrant Justice Clinic documents the harmful effects of arrests of immigrants by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) at courthouses in Massachusetts.

KJ

March 12, 2018 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 8, 2018

GGU Students Partner With Al Otro Lado

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Guest post by Vanessa Campbell, 2L at Golden Gate University School of Law

As a first generation United States citizen by birth, my initial knowledge of immigration law stemmed from my parent’s perspective as immigrants, and their struggles in obtaining legal status and becoming naturalized citizens. I entered law school wanting to practice immigration law, this past Fall I took Professor Rosenbaum’s Immigration Law class at Golden Gate University School of Law. Part of our coursework included the opportunity to work in teams of three to draft an asylum brief for a client of the non-profit organization Al Ortro Lado, with the supervision and training of our professor and the Border Rights Project program director, Nicole Ramos.

I was excited to work on the asylum project because it involved actual cases not just another law school hypothetical. As group leader, I felt fortunate to work alongside two classmates that share the same passion as I do. Our client was a young-man seeking asylum, who fled Central America with his family, after the Mara-Salvatrucha gang threatened to kill his family. For many of us living in the United States, a threat of this sort may not seem serious, but for an individual living in a country plagued by gangs this is a real threat.

The family became the gang’s target when the mother declined to be a lookout for a scheduled police raid against the gang. After experiencing several forms of harm by the gang, including targeted recruitment of our client, physical harm to other family members, and death threats, the family felt they had no other choice but to flee their country and seek asylum in the United States.

Upon reaching the border, the family made several attempts to speak with a border agent to request asylum but were told, contrary to U.S. and international law, that political asylum was no longer offered in the United States. Eventually they were permitted to request asylum, but were split up, and held in two separate detention facilities.

Knowing our client was locked up in a detention center like a criminal made me work twice as hard to ensure one day he would have a chance to speak with an immigration judge and hopefully obtain both freedom and protection in this country. This project was more than just a grade; it meant the life and freedom of our client depended on the quality of our written work.

Our brief made a particular social group nexus argument citing M-E-V-G, and based on membership in his nuclear family, contending the cumulative direct and indirect harm he experienced rose to the level of past persecution. Even though our client was not physically harmed, the various attacks upon his family, and the gang recruitment constitute past persecution and fear of future persecution.

The hardest part of this project was not being able to meet, or communicate directly with our client detained at the border in San Diego. In the future, I hope that GGU students might get the opportunity to meet their clients in person. It would have meant a lot to our team to have been able to let our client know in person, that he had someone fighting for him on the outside.

This project taught me about teamwork, how to collaborate on a brief, how to work tirelessly to research the law, but especially how to advocate for our client. I am happy to report our brief was submitted to the court and our client was released from the detention center. It feels wonderful knowing I was part of making that happen. After taking my first immigration law course I know with 100% certainty that immigration law is my path.

[For an update on the case and related litigation alleging labor trafficking violations of immigrant detainees, including this asylum applicant, see:  http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/immigration/sd-me-detention-lawsuit-20171229-story.html]

-KitJ on behalf of Vanessa Campbell

January 8, 2018 in Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

The Trump Effect? Student interest in immigration law rises with recent political developments

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Mark F. Walsh for the ABA Journal reports that the legal and political furor set off by President Trump's travel ban and related executive orders has had a profound impact on U.S. law schools and students. Interest in immigration law is surging, and schools are ramping up programs and staffing to meet soaring demand from students and immigrants.

In the long term, the trend also could birth a new wave of immigration law specialists. “One of the silver linings of this administration’s policy for immigrants is it’s recruiting a generation of advocates,” says Maureen Sweeney, an immigration law instructor at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law.

Evidence that immigration law has gained a new cachet on campuses isn’t hard to find. At the Fordham University School of Law, for example, enrollment for the introductory immigration law course this fall more than tripled to 90 students from last year.

“We had to move to a larger room,” says Jennifer Gordon, a professor who teaches the class at Fordham. “Student demand jumped enormously.”

Similarly, Sweeney says her immigration law class has doubled in size to more than 50 students. Further, 9 percent of incoming students chose immigration as one of their top two law specialty preferences, an increase from 4 percent in 2014.

KJ

KJ

November 7, 2017 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Alabama Law Clinic DACA Informational Video

 

The University of Alabama Law Clinic students explain the current status of DACA in this video.

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KJ

 

 

 

September 20, 2017 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

New Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown Law

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A team of distinguished attorneys with deep experience in trial and appellate advocacy, national security law and federal prosecution today launched the Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection at Georgetown Law.

Drawing on expert litigators, Georgetown Law’s constitutional scholarship and a strategic approach to high-impact cases, the new institute aims to teach students to use the power of the courts to defend U.S. constitutional rights and values. 

The Institute’s faculty director will be Georgetown Law Professor Neal Katyal, who has previously served as faculty director of Georgetown Law’s Center on National Security and the Law, has argued 34 Supreme Court cases and has served as acting U.S. solicitor general.  The executive director will be Joshua A. Geltzer, former senior director for counterterrorism at the National Security Council (NSC), who also served as senior national security legal counsel both at the NSC and in the Justice Department.  Rounding out the leadership team as senior litigator will be Mary B. McCord, former acting assistant attorney general and former principal deputy assistant attorney general for national security at the Justice Department, who previously spent nearly 20 years as a career prosecutor, including as Criminal Division chief and Appellate Division deputy chief in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia. 

Employing the model successfully used by Katyal in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld to dramatically roll back unprecedented government policies, culminating with the landmark Supreme Court decision in 2006, the Institute will pursue strategic litigation to draw clear recognition of constitutional rights in areas such as immigration restrictions, religious discrimination, free expression and privacy protection, national security, and whistleblower protection, among other areas.

“The Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection is part of Georgetown Law’s commitment to teaching our students about constitutional design and structure, and will help reinforce the rule of law at a time when legislative oversight is often limited at all levels of our government,” said Katyal.

As with the Hamdan case, Georgetown Law scholarship and students will play a key role in helping develop, execute and support successful litigation strategies that can result in groundbreaking Supreme Court decisions.  When Katyal developed and argued Hamdan all the way up to the Supreme Court, more than 70 Georgetown Law students over seven semesters participated in nearly every aspect of the case’s preparation, and the case was mooted in Georgetown Law’s esteemed Supreme Court Institute. The resulting Supreme Court decision ensured that the Geneva Conventions would apply across the globe in what the government was calling the “War on Terror,” ending ghost prisons around the world and forcing the Bush Administration to end its use of waterboarding.

“The Institute will give Georgetown Law students incomparable opportunities to participate in impact litigation from the ground up in ways that will shape a deep understanding of constitutional law and the role of the courts in our democracy. We are honored that legal leaders with the stature of Neal, Mary and Josh are building this enterprise here,” said Georgetown Law Dean William M. Treanor.

McCord and Geltzer, who will also serve as Georgetown Law visiting professors, will launch a practicum course there starting later this school year. The Institute has already started working to support critical constitutional challenges.

Today the Institute filed an amicus brief in ODonnell v. Harris County, a class action suit arguing that the Texas county’s practice of detaining misdemeanor defendants before trial based solely on their inability to pay money bail, while others who can are released, offends the Constitution, undermines confidence in the criminal justice system and fails to promote safer communities.

McCord led the drafting of the amicus brief on behalf of dozens of her fellow former and current prosecutors from around the country. It explains how reformed bail systems have been successful in ensuring appearance in court and protecting public safety by using individualized risk assessments and imposing non-financial conditions of release pending trial.

“As career prosecutors, we know that using bail to keep poor people locked up for days, weeks or even months for minor offenses is not only unconstitutional, but also counterproductive from a law enforcement perspective,” McCord said. “The legitimacy of the criminal justice system is dependent on it being a fair system that does not discriminate based on wealth.”

The Institute is also supporting key plaintiffs in another Texas case, City of El Cenizo v. Texas, which challenges a new state law that seeks to counter “sanctuary city” policies. The law, currently scheduled to take effect on September 1, purports to make it a crime for police and other public agencies to pursue an approach to enforcing federal immigration law contrary to that officially endorsed by the State of Texas, even if they believe it is in the best interest of public safety.

“Like Mary and Neal, I have dedicated much of my career to developing and defending responsible executive branch authorities,” said Geltzer who, among other things, previously worked at the Justice Department on reforming intelligence collection authorities after the Edward Snowden leaks and at the White House on developing the national strategy to fight ISIS.

“However,” Geltzer added, “we also recognize the critical importance of respecting the constitutional and moral limits to executive power, and we will fight to ensure the courts play a critical role in marking those limits and thus defending our country’s vital constitutional way of life.”

The Institute is also involved in pending legal matters related to civil servant protections and freedom of expression.

KJ

August 9, 2017 in Current Affairs, Immigration Law Clinics | Permalink | Comments (0)