Wednesday, September 20, 2023

TRAC Immigration: Record Number of New Immigration Court Cases Arrive in August; Destinations For Asylum Seekers Shifting

The latest from TRAC Immigration:

"August 2023 saw a record number of new deportation cases arrive at the Immigration Court. A total of 180,065 new Notices to Appear (NTAs) arrived during August. This is a jump of 19 percent in just one month; July filings had reached a previous high of 151,910. . . . All Immigration Courts across the country are struggling with large backlogs. While the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) has ramped up recruiting efforts to add new Immigration Judges, decades of underfunding have meant that it has been unable to make a dent in the backlog which continues to climb. It has reached 2,620,591 at the end of August. " (bold added).

figure2

KJ

September 20, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 14, 2023

Symposium on the Naturalization Act of 1790 at UC Davis

A Symposium on the Naturalization Act of 1790

Paper and Response Essays to be Published in the William and Mary Law Review

UC Davis School of Law, Noon to 3:00 p.m., Friday, September 22, 2023

HYBRID

 

Opening Remarks by Kevin R. Johnson, Dean and Mabie-Apallas Professor of Public Interest Law and Chicana/o Studies, UC Davis School of Law.

Presentation: Gabriel J. Chin, Martin Luther King Jr. Professor and Edward L. Barrett Jr. Chair, and Director of Clinical Legal Education, UC Davis School of Law & Paul Finkelman, Professor Emeritus, Albany Law School. The “Free White Persons” Clause of the Naturalization Act of 1790 as Super-Statute

 

Responses:

Bethany Berger, Wallace Stevens Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law. Separate, Sovereign, and Subjugated?: Native Citizenship and the 1790 Trade and Intercourse Act

Ming Hsu Chen, Harry & Lillian Hastings Research Chair; Faculty-Director, Center for Race, Immigration, Citizenship & Equality. The Road Not Taken: A Critical Juncture in Racial Preferences for Naturalized Citizenship

Rose Cuison-Villiazor, Professor of Law and Chancellor's Social Justice Scholar; Director, Center for Immigration Law, Policy and Justice, Rutgers Law School

Amanda Frost, John A. Ewald Jr. Research Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law. Schizophrenic Citizenship

UCD Natz Act 2023-09-11 211826

MHC

September 14, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

Call for Papers: AILA Law Journal Symposium on Shaping Immigration Policy Through the Federal Courts

American Immigration Lawyers Association

The AILA Law Journal will be hosting a symposium on March 21, 2024 entitled “Shaping Immigration Policy Through the Federal Courts.” Further details are in the link here.

The invitation:

"The AILA Law Journal Symposium invites proposals for papers on immigration executive actions and the federal courts, including executive actions already undertaken and proposals for new executive actions, and in the course of rulemaking and agency policy formulation. Papers should also explore court challenges, or potential court challenges, to these actions as well as non-litigation options. In addition, papers may discuss the role of federal courts in addressing jurisdiction, standing, providing injunctive relief or vacatur, and in interpreting statutes and regulations. Please send a 300- to 500-word paper proposal to [email protected] by September 30, 2023. Selected participants will be expected to submit a draft of their paper by January 3, 2024, with final papers due by the March 21, 2024, symposium. Questions may be directed to [email protected] with the subject line `Symposium.'”

KJ

 

September 13, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 12, 2023

Training to Deferred Action for Labor Enforcement

Mary Yanik (Tulane Law School) and Lynn Damiano Pearson (consulting with NILC) will be facilitating a short and interactive webinar for law students who are helping immigrant workers apply for deferred action for labor enforcement through their law school clinics.

They write:

Many law school clinics are working with community groups and organizers to support these workers through individual representation, mass representation clinics, and everything in between. This is a huge part of the effort to trying to close the immigration representation gap for these workers. In this webinar, we hope to help orient students to the movement work that led to the labor deferred action announcement and how their work on these cases is contributing to building immigrant worker power through organizing!

Please share with your students—any and all students in clinics working on these cases are invited! Faculty welcome, too.

Training for Law School Clinics

Building Power by Supporting Immigrant Workers Seeking Deferred Action

September 15, 2023 | 2-3:30 ET/1-2:30 CT/11-12:30 PT

Register here to get the Zoom link

In January 2023, the Department of Homeland Security issued new guidance creating a "streamlined" process for workers involved in labor disputes to apply for deferred action.  This process protects immigrant workers from retaliation and deportation while exercising their rights to report labor violations. Immigrant workers and labor rights group are increasingly using this tool to build power among immigrant communities and for worker rights in general.  One challenge to achieving these movement goals is the lack of capacity among immigration practitioners to represent all eligible workers.  As a result, law school clinics have been playing a critical role in supporting workers seeking deferred action, both through direct representation and limited legal services models.  This training will provide an brief history of the movement to win the new streamlined process, an overview of the new process, and the nuts and bolts of filing these deferred action applications with USCIS.

 

MHC

September 12, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 11, 2023

Citizenship Day at UC Law SF

1

Download Citizenship Day flyer 9-2023

The Center for Race, Immigration, Citizenship, and Equality (RICE) will be joining research and practice on Citizenship Day in a hybrid event on September 21, 2023 (12:30-2pm).  ImmProf Amanda Frost, University of Virginia, will joins Lucia Martel Dow (Director of the New Americans Campaign, Immigrant Legal Resource Center) and Marco Tueros Del Barco (UC Law SF Class of 2005 and Students' for Immigrants Rights President) to discuss the historical significance and contemporary challenges of citizenship. They will also discuss opportunities for law students to engage in pro bono citizenship workshops to help green card holders file for naturalization with the USCIS.

After the program, there will be a reception to introduce RICE faculty-director Ming H. Chen and affiliates to the RICE advisory board, consisting of Prof. Hiroshi Motomura, Prof. Irene Bloemraad, Prof. Gabriel Jack Chin, SF Commissioner and former Dean John Trasvina, Catherine Seitz (Immigration Institute of Bay Area), and Lucia Martel-Dow (ILRC).

Register here for in-person and virtual attendance.

To learn more about Citizenship Day and USCIS Naturalization Activities, click here.

MHC

September 11, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 10, 2023

On the New "Alien Land Laws"

There has been a rise in legislative attempts within the U.S. to ". . . bar citizens of foreign adversaries from being able to purchase real property." More information in this story, With New “Alien Land Laws” Asian Immigrants Are Once Again Targeted by Real Estate BansLinks to an external site.

 

Also, here is info on a NAPABA webinar about these laws taking place next week.

After a series of state laws were introduced earlier this year that threatened to discriminate against the rights of immigrants to own property, the National Iranian American Council (NIAC) organized a broad coalition of civil society and civil rights groups to fight them back. Now we have to organize at the federal level to defeat the Rounds Amendment, which would ban Iranian, Chinese, North Korean, and Russian nationals from purchasing certain agricultural property or private real estate used in agriculture.

Join a call on Tuesday, September 12 at 6pm ET/3pm PT.

We will dive into our coalition's fight against alien land laws and learn ways to act. We'll have special guest Gene Wu, State Representative for Texas' District 137. This event is co-hosted by NIAC, AAJC (Asian Americans Advancing Justice), and NAPABA (National Asian Pacific American Bar Association), with grassroots participation from the AAPI and Iranian American communities. A Q&A will follow

Contact [email protected] for the zoom link.
 
MHC
 
 
 

September 10, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 8, 2023

Conference: Envisioning And Embodying Radical Practice Honoring All Rebellious Practitioners – Including Gerald P. López October 5 & 6 | UCLA School of Law

Flyer for the 2023 Critical Race Studies Symposium featuring an image of Gerald Lopez

Envisioning And Embodying Radical Practice

Honoring All Rebellious Practitioners – Including Gerald P. López

October 5 & 6 | UCLA School of Law

Gerald P. López published Rebellious Lawyering: One Chicano’s Vision of Progressive Law Practice in 1992. The book brought to life how he and others had been practicing for decades. Through “fictional characters and settings as real as can be,” Rebellious Lawyering illuminated how people do what they do when collaborating with others as equals. To fight subordination of every sort. To transform institutions, systems, nations, and transnational life.  To personify – and not just prefigure – the concrete utopias they seek. Militantly challenging subordination in all forms and transforming life as we know it are at the center of the rebellious vision, and UCLA Law’s Critical Race Studies program is honored to devote this symposium to looking at rebellious practice past, present, and future.


REGISTER NOW FOR THE 2023 SYMPOSIUM

See our agenda below or download a copy.
 
ImmigrationProf blogger Bill Hing is on the program.
 
Kj

 

September 8, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 31, 2023

Challenges to Decisional Independence: Lessons from the Immigration Courts

image from lhscimmigration.comOn October 18 at 4 p.m. Eastern, Widener University Commonwealth Law School is hosting a really interesting CLE event featuring retired Immigration Judge Steven Morley on "Challenges to Decisional Independence: Lessons from the Immigration Courts." Judge Morley will discuss challenges to the independence of agency adjudicators, drawing on his experience in the immigration courts, including his removal from a pending case during the Trump Administration. During his time as a judge, he adjudicated a wide variety of applications for relief from removal and rendered written and oral decisions on complex immigration law questions. 

More information and how to sign up is available here.

IE

August 31, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Webinar: What Now? Immigration Law & Policy in the Post-Title 42 Landscape

Wednesday, August 30, 2023

AALS Immigration Section Call for Papers 2023: Deadline Extension

Earlier this year, the AALS Immigration Section a call for papers for the 2024 AALS annual meeting, set to be held in Washington DC from January 3-6, 2024

The deadline for submission to the main panel of the Immigration Section is extended to September 8, 2023. The original call for papers is here and below.

The AALS Section on Immigration Law is pleased to announce a program titled Immigrants Defending Democracy and Resisting Dictatorship during the 2024 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (January 3-6, 2024). Extremist and authoritarian groups are using anti-immigrant platforms to gain political influence. At the same time, immigrants are playing an important role in promoting democratic movements and resisting dictatorial ones. This panel will explore issues in the US and global context.

  • FORMAT: Scholars whose papers are selected will provide a presentation of their papers and participate in the panel discussion, followed by commentary and audience Q&A.
  • SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send a draft or summary of at least three pages to Professor Fatma Marouf on or before September 1, 2023. The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—AALS Immigration Section CFP.”
  • Scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit a draft by December 1, 2023.

The deadline for works-in-progress to be discussed at the New Voices session is also extended to September 8. The call for papers is here and below.

We are looking for New Voices in Immigration Law to highlight at the meeting.
  • The New Voices session will be structured as a works-in-progress discussion, rather than as a panel. Pre-selected commentators will lead discussion of selected papers. Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives. 
  • SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: The deadline for submissions is September 1, 2023. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars. Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Carolina Núñez at [email protected]. The subject line should be "AALS 2024: New Voices in Immigration Law." In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. 

Pursuant to AALS rules, faculty at fee-paid non-member law schools, foreign faculty, adjunct and visiting faculty (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school), graduate students, fellows, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit. Please note that all presenters at the program are responsible for paying their own annual meeting registration fees and travel expenses.

 

All the best,
 
Ming Hsu Chen, Mike Kagan, Kathleen Kim, Fatma Marouf, Carolina Núñez 
on behalf of the AALS Immigration Section Executive Committee

August 30, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 22, 2023

AALS 2024 Call for Papers: Equality Law and Social Sciences

The AALS Section on Law and Social Sciences welcomes proposals to present at the AALS Annual Meeting on a panel on Equality Law and Social Sciences to take place on Sat., Jan. 6 at 10:00—11:40 AM. This panel will focus broadly on the use of social sciences to identify new fronts in equality law. The interdisciplinary discussion will focus on revealing and remedying disparities, inequities, and inequalities in law and society in reference to race, gender, sexuality, class, immigration, disability, age, geography, family, or other factors. We welcome presentations that are U.S.-focused or comparative in scope and those that draw on diverse methodologies in social sciences. Proposals may also engage theoretical or methodological questions as part of the broader discussion about identifying and remedying social inequalities. We particularly welcome proposals from emerging or pre-tenure scholars.    

Please submit presentation proposals consisting of a 500-word abstract to Section Chair Professor Suzanne Kim at [email protected] by Sept. 5, 2023.    

Calls for the AALS Immigration Section main session and WIPs went out previously here and here.

MHC

August 22, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 17, 2023

Call for Papers: CSLSA at the U. of OKLAHOMA! (Boomer Sooner!)

Cslsa

The official details are below, but let me preface this post with my deep and fervent hope that you'll consider coming to Norman, OK for this year's CSLSA conference. The conference is not subject specific, but usually includes panels on immigration, international law, and criminal law. From experience, I can report that CSLSA provides a friendly, intimate, and collegial setting in which to present scholarship. It's open to both junior and senior scholars (and pesky midlevels like myself).

 

CALL FOR PAPERS PRESENTATIONS

2023 ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP CONFERENCE

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA COLLEGE OF LAW

NORMAN, OKLAHOMA

SEPTEMBER 22-23, 2023

The Central States Law Schools Association invites you to submit to present at the 2023 Annual Scholarship Conference, which will be held on Friday, September 22 and Saturday, September 23, 2023, at the University of Oklahoma College of Law in Norman.

Papers on all law-related topics will be considered. Scholars from member and nonmember schools are invited to participate. Early stage projects are welcome, as are near-final manuscripts. There is no need to submit a manuscript or draft paper, but please provide a brief abstract or description to help the organizers to create the panel schedule.

CSLSA is special for being an intimate, friendly, and relaxed works-in-progress conference, involving participants from a wide array of legal fields. It's a great conference for anyone looking to network with or get feedback from persons outside their regular scholarly niche. And it's a particularly great opportunity for junior profs – both for the networking opportunities and the supportive atmosphere it provides.

About CSLSA: CSLSA is an organization of law schools dedicated to providing a forum for conversation and collaboration among law school academics. Scholars from member and nonmember schools are invited to submit, attend, and participate in the annual conference.

About OU and Norman: Norman is a walkable city bursting with arts, music, restaurants, and funky shopping. OU’s distinctive architecture, dubbed “Cherokee Gothic” by Frank Lloyd Wright, mixes traditional collegiate elements and Native American design. OU’s world-class free-admission Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art hosts renown collections of Native American art and French Impressionism. And the acclaimed Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History is next-door to the College of Law.

Information and submissions: More information is available at cslsa.us. The direct link for the submissions form is https://forms.gle/GDSzVgkTbNMt6SyJA.

-KitJ

August 17, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 14, 2023

AALS 2024 Call for Papers: Immigrants Defending Democracy and Resisting Dictatorship

The AALS Section on Immigration Law is pleased to announce a program titled Immigrants Defending Democracy and Resisting Dictatorship during the 2024 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (January 3-6, 2024). Extremist and authoritarian groups are using anti-immigrant platforms to gain political influence. At the same time, immigrants are playing an important role in promoting democratic movements and resisting dictatorial ones. This panel will explore issues in the US and global context. 

  • FORMAT: Scholars whose papers are selected will provide a presentation of their papers and participate in the panel discussion, followed by commentary and audience Q&A.
  • SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send a draft or summary of at least three pages to Professor Fatma Marouf on or before September 1, 2023. The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—AALS Immigration Section CFP.”
  • Scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit a draft by December 1, 2023.
  • Please note that all presenters at the program are responsible for paying their own annual meeting registration fees and travel expenses.

The AALS 2024 Call for Papers: New Voices in Immigration Law (works-in-progress) is posted here.

MHC

August 14, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 12, 2023

AALS 2024 Call for Papers: New Voices in Immigration Law

The AALS Immigration Section is issuing a call for papers for the 2024 AALS annual meeting, set to be held in Washington DC from January 3-6, 2024.
We are looking for New Voices in Immigration Law to highlight at the meeting. The New Voices session will be structured as a works-in-progress discussion, rather than as a panel. Pre-selected commentators will lead discussion of selected papers. Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives. 
Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is September 12023. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars. Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Carolina Núñez at [email protected]. The subject line should be "AALS 2023: New Voices in Immigration Law." In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. 
 
Please note that presenters are responsible for their own annual meeting registration fee.
 
AALS Immigration Section Executive Committee consists of: Ming Hsu Chen, Michael Kagan, Kathleen Kim, Carolina Núñez, Fatma Marouf.
 
MHC

August 12, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 31, 2023

Call for Papers: Special Issue in Honor of the 60th Anniversary of International Migration Review

 
The International Migration Review (IMR) has been internationally regarded as the principal journal in the field facilitating the study of human migration, ethnic group relations, and refugee movements. The journal invites scholars and researchers to contribute to a special issue on the multifaceted topic of international migration. The special issue seeks to provide a benchmark in international migration studies by examining extant, evolving, and emerging models of international migration research.
 
To illustrate: How successful has international migration research been at communicating and sharing knowledge and evidence with diverse groups of stakeholders, including policymakers, advocates, international and non-governmental organizations, the public, and migrants themselves? To what extent and how fruitfully has migration research integrated the field’s multidisciplinary nature? How have models and methods of doing research—new and mixed methodologies, interdisciplinary teams, community-based participatory research, international collaborations, using organic/”big” data and administrative data, and more—changed over time and, more importantly, what has the benefit been for migration theory-building and knowledge? What impacts has the field had on evidence-based policy and public opinion? What has the field of international migration studies accomplished, and what new analytic goals might be pursued?
 
Topic examples:

• social, demographic, cultural, economic, political, and environmental impacts of international migration on individuals, families, communities, and societies in places of origin and destination.
• irregular migration and the changing landscapes of nationality and citizenship, particularly the erosion of human rights and civil rights for those who are not recognized by a state, such as trafficked and stateless persons, asylum seekers, and undocumented migrants.
• recent surges in refugee and asylee populations globally, and complementary pathways in protection, humanitarian assistance, and resettlement.
• international migration and public health crises, such as COVID, including epidemiological shifts, policy responses, and planning.
• impacts of climate change and environmental shifts on international migration patterns and on migrants’ health and well-being, and policy responses for climate migration.
• new understandings of transnational migrant links and networks and their importance in politics, religion, culture, family and community relationships, and the economy and remittances.
• policy responses, legal issues, and migration governance, especially the changing role of the state and new responses in regional and global migration management and policies, as well as innovations in models and modes of immigrant integration, and public opinion and attitudes.

Procedure and Timeline

  • Extended abstracts of 1,250 words (~5 pages, double-spaced) due September 30, 2023.
  • Invitations to submit full papers will be issued by November 1, 2023.
  • Full papers will be due by February 1, 2024.
  • The special issue will be published in Fall/Winter 2024.

Authors must submit full papers directly to International Migration Review and follow the journal’s submission guidelines and standard peer-review process. 

For more information, and to submit an extended abstract, please contact the Editor-In-Chief: Holly E. Reed, [email protected]

MHC

July 31, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 6, 2023

Call For Papers: 2023 University of Arkansas Law Review symposium on “Children at Work.”

Call for Papers

CHILDREN AT WORK
UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS LAW REVIEW SYMPOSIUM

We are pleased to announce the 2023 University of Arkansas Law Review symposium on “Children at Work.”

In recent months, the U.S. Department of Labor has reported a substantial increase in serious child labor law violations. A New York Times expose uncovered migrant children working in U.S. workplaces, including those that produce Fritos and Fruit of the Loom products. Yet, during this same period, numerous states have introduced or enacted laws to weaken longstanding child labor protections. Meanwhile, laws strengthening child labor laws or enhancing penalties for violations have been proposed in Congress and enacted in Arkansas.

This symposium will explore topics related to child labor in and beyond the United States.

  • What is known about trends in where children are working, how much they work, and why they work?

  • At what age is it appropriate for children to work? What limitations should there be and who should set them?

  • What are the causes of increased child labor violations? What is the history of child labor and child labor law? How does it compare to other countries?

  • What is the role of the state in protecting children? What are unique challenges in enforcing child labor laws and securing the rights of children? Do current laws and enforcement strategies fall short? If so, how might they be improved?

  • To the extent that children are employees, what are the implications for unions and organizing strategies? How do and should children participate in unions and organizing? Does the National Labor Relations Act adequately address the prospect of minor union members?

  • What is the relationship between immigration policy and child labor? What issues face immigrant children at work? What about the relationship between human trafficking and child labor? How should concerns about child labor trafficking shape federal and state policy?

  • What unique risks do children face in the workplace? What are the benefits of appropriate work by children? What is the relationship between work and educational and other outcomes?

The University of Arkansas Law Review invites authors exploring these and related issues to submit proposals for papers. Selected authors will be invited to present their research at the Law Review’s annual Symposium, which will be held at the University of Arkansas Law School in Fayetteville on Friday, October 13, 2023. If you accept an invitation, the Law Review will provide transportation and accommodation in Fayetteville. Following the Symposium, proposals will be developed into approximately forty-page papers, which will be due by January 5, 2024. Once completed, we plan to publish the papers in Volume 77 of the Law Review.

Proposals should be submitted to the Symposium Editor, John Hudson (jah057 at uark.edu) and Professor Annie Smith (abs006 at uark.edu) with the subject line “Children at Work” by August 1, 2023. Decisions will be communicated by August 7, 2023. Should you have any questions, please contact John and Professor Smith at the above listed emails.

July 6, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 21, 2023

Call for Papers: Migrants and the City, Urban History Review

The Urban History Review / Revue d’histoire urbaine is calling for article proposals for a special issue on “Migrants and the City,” scheduled for publication in the Spring of 2025.

Cities are destinations, places to visit, and transit points; they are created, shaped, and transformed by the presence and actions of migrants. In a context of ongoing political debate about the present and future implications of migration in Canada and abroad, its history demands ongoing attention. This special issue will focus on people who arrived in cities as part of voluntary or involuntary migrations of various scales. Exploring the city through the lens of migration also means thinking about both the city and migration in terms of contact and exchange networks, from colonial and imperial trade routes to the global flow of capital that drives labor migration in the post-industrial era. As sites of power and centers of material, intellectual, and artistic production, cities have attracted and hosted workers and union organizers, artists and political activists, academics, and civil servants. The representations we have of cities, even their position within urban networks, come in part from histories of mobility.

While the meanings and consequences associated with being “foreign” have often been understood at a national scale and via the category of citizenship, urban history reveals the importance of power relations ranging from the global to the local that have also shaped migratory experience.

This special issue invites scholars to ask: To what extent have migrants and minorities with migrant backgrounds enjoyed access to urban space, to housing and property, to places of entertainment and leisure? How have authorities and developers planned and managed urban spaces with these populations in mind? How have migrants drawn the attention of urban institutions? How have their activities contributed to the local economy? To what extent have they driven economic change? In what ways have migrants and migrant communities interacted with the mainstream population and with other minorities? What issues have shaped their conflicts and struggles? How have they contributed to public debates, to intellectual and artistic production, to the dissemination of knowledge?

These questions can be addressed through a variety of historical and interdisciplinary approaches. We also hope that the theme of “migrants and the city” will inspire contributions from scholars active in diverse areas of historical research. Finally, we remain open to proposals that deal with Canadian cities as well as urban centers in other countries, or that adopt a comparative approach.

Schedule

May 30, 2023: deadline for receipt of article proposals (250–300 words)

June 30, 2023: notification to authors selected for inclusion

November 30, 2023: deadline for submission of articles ready for peer review (maximum length of 8,000–10,000 words)

Please follow the Review’s guidelines available at:

https://www.utpjournals.press/journals/uhr/submissions

Please submit your proposals to:

Harold Bérubé, co-editor: [email protected]

Nicolas Kenny, co-editor: [email protected]

Jordan Stanger-Ross, guest editor: [email protected] 

Sylvie Taschereau, guest editor: [email protected] 

June 21, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Papers: Contemporary Human Mobilities: Uncovering Dissonance(s) between Governance Practices and Lived Experiences

Call for Papers: Contemporary Human Mobilities. Uncovering Dissonance(s) between Governance Practices and Lived Experiences

In the (near) future, we can expect human mobility and migration to accelerate further due to growing inequality and shifts in global (economic) power, regional implications of climate change and resource scarcity, increasing urbanisation, and demographic and social change. Migration and human mobility will continue posing great political, legal, socio-economic, and societal challenges for all involved. Scholarship to date has focused on the many aspects of national and cross-border migration regimes that have been established or reformed to address contemporary challenges. However, the lived experiences of migration and human mobility deserve more attention to address the ever-developing challenges.

To remedy this, the proposed conference serves a two-fold purpose. First, it aims to uncover, discuss, and assess dissonances between the governance practices and lived experiences of human mobility and migration. Second, it turns scholarly attention to the concept of repair, i.e. subtle acts of care by which order, meaning and human value are maintained and transformed. Repair, here, is understood in its widest possible sense, including material, policy, discursive, symbolic and affective dimensions of repair. Against the backdrop of climate change, (political, economical, racial and social) injustice, inequality and erosion of rights as core causes of migration, we see repair as practice and ethics that makes possible and sustains just institutions and transversal solidarities.

It is evident that the complexity of human mobility and migration, the existing dissonance between governance practices and lived experience, and the many facets of repair work needed to address such dissonances cannot be captured by one discipline alone. With this conference, we aim to bring together scholars of different fields - from students to specialists - to accelerate knowledge-sharing, interdisciplinary collaboration and foster cross-disciplinary discussions.

Topics

To stimulate this kind of discussion, we invite individual papers or panels related to Europe on the (indicative, non-exhaustive) topics below:

Identify dissonances between governance and lived experience with regard to HuMM that undermine (democratic) institutions and ultimately threaten societal cohesion

  • Integration and discrimination in the labour market, education, housing, and local communities
  • Politics and economics of border technologies and exclusionary practices
  • Internal and external factors influencing migration and asylum regimes

Introduce a common holistic understanding of the underlying conditions causing these dissonances by fostering interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse scholarly exchange

  • Challenges of migration and human mobility or people on the move, and communities of origin and of destination
  • Motivations behind changing perceptions and public opinion on migrants and / or refugees
  • Robustness and / or porousness of external border regimes

Rethink and develop technologies, techniques and infrastructure as tools to repair dissonances

  • Role of social networks and citizenship in repair work
  • Sustainable participation and representation in institutional, political and cultural domains
  • A (transatlantic) comparison of migration and asylum regimes
  • Cooperation within the EU to balance (the consequences of) human mobility and migration

We strongly endorse methodological and theoretical pluralism. Papers using a variety of methodological and theoretical approaches are welcome, and we especially encourage interdisciplinary, transnational, comparative and empirically-driven work.

How to participate

Please submit your paper abstract (300 words max. + paper title + 5 keywords) or panel abstract (panel title and short description, 3–4 paper abstracts, each 300 words max. + paper title + 5 keywords) electronically to at [email protected] no later than July 21, 2023.

A selection of papers will be included in an edited volume with a reputable publishing house to be published in 2024. The conference is simultaneously intended to strengthen the network of scholars working on issues of migration and human mobility for the continued development of a COST Action proposal. Some parts of the conference program may also be dedicated towards these activities.

Important dates
  • 21 July 2023: closing of submission phase for individual paper abstract / panel abstract and travel allowance application (sent to [email protected])
  • Early September 2023: Notification of acceptance paper-givers
  • 30 September 2023: Registration via email ([email protected]), no registration fee
  • 7 January 2024: Deadline for paper synopsis (1,000 words) submission for circulation among conference participants
  • 25-26 January 2024: Presentation of papers at conference

Please contact [email protected] for all topic-related questions you may have.

MHC

June 21, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

TRAC Immigration: Asylum Grant Rates Climb Under Biden

TRAC Reports Menu

TRAC Immigration's latest report has some interesting findings:

"Under the new Biden administration asylum seekers are seeing greater success rates in securing asylum. While asylum denial rates had grown ever higher during the Trump years to a peak of 71 percent in FY 2020, they fell to 63 percent in FY 2021. Expressed another way, success rates grew from 29 percent to 37 percent under President Biden.

However, with the continuing partial court shutdown during the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a sustained drop in the number of asylum decisions. This means fewer asylum seekers actually won their cases despite this improving success rate. During FY 2021 just 23,827 asylum decisions were made. This is down from 60,079 decisions during FY 2020."

Click the link to the report for details.

KJ

June 21, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 20, 2023

Call For Papers: AALS 2024--Clinical Section's program Collaborating to Defend Democracy in Communities Under Attack

The AALS Clinical Section is seeking presenters and Works-in-Progress (“WIPs”) for its program at the 2024 AALS Annual Meeting. The 2024 meeting will be held January 3-6, 2024, in Washington, DC, and will focus on the theme, Defending Democracy. Given your work teaching immigration law and defending immigrants' rights, we are excited to receive your submissions.

The Clinical Section’s program, Collaborating to Defend Democracy in Communities Under Attack, will highlight the work of law faculty collaborating across clinical and non-clinical spaces to defend communities under attack across the country. This program will take a deep dive into the ever-expanding attacks on historically marginalized communities and feature collaborations among law clinics, externship programs, and non-clinical faculty to defend and support historically marginalized communities. Overall, the program also seeks to highlight the value of collaboration across clinical and non-clinical faculty members to bolster responses to subordination from oppressive laws and policies.  

Potential areas of interest for the program include, but are not limited to:  

  • Reproductive rights  
  • Transgender rights  
  • Divisive Concepts Laws (including how law schools in states with such laws can comply with ABA Standard 303)  
  • Racial justice  
  • Police accountability  
  • Immigrant rights  
  • Voting rights  
  • Protest, organizing, and activism  
  • Affirmative action  
  • Property rights/the affordable housing crisis  
  • Surveillance and ethical technology  

There will be two separate sessions: a panel presentation on the theme and a Works-in-Progress session. We are looking for individuals or groups of faculty members working in any of the identified areas or in any area that fits within the program theme. We welcome submissions for panelists, WIPs, or both. It is not necessary to have a WIP to submit as a presenter for the panel session.    

Panelist Submissions: Submissions for the panel should include an abstract of no more than 500 words, including a description of how the panelist(s) collaborate across clinical and non-clinical spaces to respond to one or more communities under attack. Please also include names, contact information, number of years teaching, and any prior AALS presentations and the year given for each panelist. Please submit proposals to Allison Freedman ([email protected]) and Anne Gordon ([email protected]) by July 15, 2023. We look forward to your submissions!

WIP Submissions: Submissions for the WIP should include an abstract of no more than 500 words, including the title of your work, name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation(s), years of clinical teaching experience, and contact information. Please indicate whether your submission is at an early stage or near completion. Submissions should be sent to Julie Dahlstrom ([email protected]) by September 1, 2023.   

June 20, 2023 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)