Friday, August 16, 2019

Call for Papers--AILA Law Journal Spring 2020 Edition

AILA_Logo

The AILA Law Journal is seeking papers for its Spring 2020 edition.

Articles should run 4500-7000 words, lightly cited. All articles must be original. However, authors and columnists may reproduce their articles and columns, and place them on their websites, with attribution to and after publication in the AILA Law Journal.

All articles must be submitted via email in Word, as an attachment. All charts, graphs, and, tables should be typed or professionally typeset and must be submitted via email. Articles should not use extensive endnotes. Do not put citations in the text; rather, use endnotes only.

Submissions should include a clearly written, short author biography, author address, direct phone number, and email address. Authors should provide a two- or three-sentence summary of the article. Articles should be written in neutral, third-person voice. “You,” “I,” “We,” and similar terms are discouraged.

Articles must appear as continuous prose, with full sentences. Excessive use of quotation marks should be avoided. They should not be used when referring to a few ordinary words of a speaker or writer. They are appropriate for coined phrases, but only those that are unfamiliar, and only on first reference.

Submission Deadline: December 1, 2019

Submit to: ailalawjournal@aila.org

-KitJ

August 16, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

LatCrit/SALT Annual Faculty Development Workshop

Latcrit

The LatCrit, Inc./SALT Annual Faculty Development Workshop (FDW) will take place on October 17, 2019. The FDW will be held the day before the2019 LatCrit Biennial Conference “The Dispossessed Majority: Resisting the Second Redemption in América Posfascista (Postfascist America)” in Atlanta, Georgia.

The FDW is designed for those who are planning to enter or who have recently joined the legal academy.  The day-long workshop includes sessions on topics facing prospective, junior, and pre-tenured faculty, while providing generous opportunities to network and form mentoring relationships with established faculty. The FDW is an invaluable learning and professional development opportunity!

Registration for the FDW is free for attendees of the LatCrit conference. Please feel free to e-mail Professor Ron Hochbaum at rhochbaum@luc.edu with any questions. 

For more information about the LatCrit Conference, please visit http://latcrit.org/content/conferences/latcrit-biennial-conferences/2019-latcrit-biennial-conference-cfp/.

MHC

July 30, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 15, 2019

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5, 2020, 3:30-5:15PM · Washington, DC
(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at a session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for January 5, 2020 from 3:30-5:15PM. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration.”

This session will examine the “invisible wall,” a term that refers to non-statutory hurdles faced by legal immigrants. Executive branch actions at times meter access to legal immigration opportunities despite statutory opportunities. Changes in agency policy, changes in agency mood, or other phenomena can narrow the availability of legal opportunities for immigration. Examples of the invisible wall include preventing asylum seekers from accessing the border, increased denial rates of applications for legal status, and slower processing times of applications for legal status. The invisible wall implicates separation of powers principles because it questions the boundaries of executive branch enforcement. The invisible wall also challenges notions of transparency in administrative law to the extent that the invisible wall reflects changes in agency mood rather than written agency policy. It raises questions about how attorneys should respond to the challenges of the invisible wall. The invisible wall also highlights the need to explore the principles that should influence the design and governance of a legal immigration system.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission- Scaling the Invisible Wall.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Papers--AALS 2020, Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?

CALL FOR PAPERS
Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law January 3, 2020, 8:30-10:15AM · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for [TBD]. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?”.

Natural disasters and social conflicts spurred by deteriorating environmental conditions and climate change are driving people to move across borders. Economically disadvantaged communities, racial minorities and indigenous people are often in the first wave of displaced people in the world’s poorer countries. These same communities are also the most heavily impacted by pollution and environmental degradation in the places that they live and work in the United States. This panel will explore the issues of immigration and environmental regulation. How do environmental regulatory and deregulatory schemes in the U.S. impact immigrant communities? How have arguments about the effects of immigrants on the environment been used to restrict migration and the rights of migrants? How should existing domestic and international legal frameworks governing migration be revised to respond to environmentally motivated migration? How do (and how should) the rights of migrants figure into ongoing discussions and regulatory efforts around environmental justice at the domestic and international level? Do legislative proposals like the Green New Deal encompass and sufficiently address concerns of migrants?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

-KitJ

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Friday, January 3, 2020, 3:30pm-5:15pm · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for Friday, January 3, 2020, at 3:30pm.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2020: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project Lawsuit

ASAP Sues Government to Stop Deportations in Advance of ICE Raids

New York, NY — The Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) today joined the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Immigrant Defenders Law Center (ImmDef), and Public Counsel in suing the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security in an effort to stop the deportations of thousands of asylum seekers in danger of being arrested in raids rumored to begin this Sunday. ASAP and the other legal service providers bringing suit are represented by the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California, New York Civil Liberties Union, and the law firm Munger, Tolles, & Olson LLP.

The lawsuit aims to protect the refugee families and children slated for deportation by the Trump Administration, most of whom have fled widespread violence in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and other countries at the hands of their governments, murderous gangs, and other transnational criminal networks. The complaint filed today argues that the constitution requires the government to bring unrepresented individuals before an immigration judge so they can have a fair day in court before they face deportation.

“Our government is attempting to detain and deport families who came to the Mexico-U.S. border seeking asylum, and who were never given the opportunity to even present their case before an immigration judge,” said Conchita Cruz, Co-Executive Director of the Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP). “For those seeking safe haven at the Mexico-U.S. border, deportation can be a death sentence. We must ensure each and every asylum seeker has their day in court.”

“The Trump Administration’s plan to arrest and deport thousands of Central American families and children without giving them a fair day in court is both illegal and immoral,” said Ahilan Arulanantham, senior counsel at the ACLU SoCal. “More than one hundred years ago, the Supreme Court decided that immigrants could not be deported without due process. These vulnerable refugees deserve that basic protection.”

The government asserts the power to deport these refugees without any hearing because they failed to appear in immigration court. However, as the lawsuit describes in detail, these refugees failed to appear because of massive bureaucratic errors and, in some cases, deliberate misdirection by immigration enforcement agencies. The agencies’ flagrant and widespread errors made it impossible for people to know when their hearings were being held.

As both legal services organizations and news agencies have repeatedly documented, the refugees’ notices to appear in court were sent to incorrect addresses; sent after hearing dates had already passed; issued for dates when courts were not in session; and in some cases for court dates that literally did not exist (such as weekends and September 31). For example, on January 31, 2019 alone, thousands of refugees lined up for hours at courts across the country with paperwork showing that date for their hearings, only to be told there would be no hearings that day. Many of them were ordered deported for failing to appear. These refugees are now a primary target of Trump’s impending mass arrests.

“The Trump administration’s threats against immigrants run roughshod over basic fairness and due process,” said Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. “For the many families who came here as refugees fleeing violence, deportation is a death threat. We will fight to ensure no one faces this kind of peril without having their case considered in court.”

“The Trump administration’s plan to send families and children who came to this country seeking refuge from violence and abuse in their home countries back to those places, without so much as one opportunity to show a judge they are entitled under U.S. law to stay, is fundamentally at odds with what this nation stands for,” said Brad Phillips, partner at Munger, Tolles, & Olson. “We hope by this lawsuit to stop the administration’s unlawful and inhumane plan in its tracks.”

The case was filed in U.S. District Court in New York, Southern District.

***

It's always fun to see my old law firm (Munger, Tolles) and partners I knew (woot, woot Brad Phillips!) doing exciting pro bono work.

If you want to see the actual paperwork, here is a link to the complaint.

-KitJ

July 11, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 8, 2019

Call for Papers--AALS 2020, Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?

CALL FOR PAPERS
Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law January 3, 2020, 8:30-10:15AM · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for [TBD]. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?”.

Natural disasters and social conflicts spurred by deteriorating environmental conditions and climate change are driving people to move across borders. Economically disadvantaged communities, racial minorities and indigenous people are often in the first wave of displaced people in the world’s poorer countries. These same communities are also the most heavily impacted by pollution and environmental degradation in the places that they live and work in the United States. This panel will explore the issues of immigration and environmental regulation. How do environmental regulatory and deregulatory schemes in the U.S. impact immigrant communities? How have arguments about the effects of immigrants on the environment been used to restrict migration and the rights of migrants? How should existing domestic and international legal frameworks governing migration be revised to respond to environmentally motivated migration? How do (and how should) the rights of migrants figure into ongoing discussions and regulatory efforts around environmental justice at the domestic and international level? Do legislative proposals like the Green New Deal encompass and sufficiently address concerns of migrants?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

-KitJ

July 8, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 28, 2019

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Friday, January 3, 2020, 3:30pm-5:15pm · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for Friday, January 3, 2020, at 3:30pm.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2020: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 28, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Emerging Immprof: Keynote

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WSJ writer Alicia Caldwell and immprof Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia

The keynote for the 5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference was truly unique. Instead of listening to a prepared speech, we were treated to a thoroughly entertaining Q&A session between Wall Street Journal writer Alicia Caldwell and immprof Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia -- all while munching on some pretty delectable Mediterranean cuisine.

Alicia asked Shoba a series of questions about myriad current immigration topics: asylum, Remain in Mexico, DACA, TPS, prosecutorial discretion, nationwide injunctions, and the APA. It was a fantastic refresher on current events.

In the Q&A following their Q&A, Alicia gave us immprofs a number of tips about speaking with reporters ("answer the call" but know that "you guys set the rules"; be clear about whether you're offering background or an on-the-record quote) and dealing with bad actors ("If a reporter burns you, don't talk to that reporter again").

I surely hope that future immprof conferences will consider a similar format. It kept things interesting and we all learned a lot from Alicia's participation.

-KitJ

June 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 14, 2019

Emerging Immprof: New Frontiers in Immigration Law Scholarship

IMG_2495
Immprofs Shalini Ray, Michael Kagan, Emily Ryo, Sarah Lamdan, and Anil Kalhan

The second day of the 5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference started with a panel on immigration scholarship. Shalini Ray (Alabama) moderated a spirited discussion on the topic.

Sarah Lamdan (CUNY) kicked things off with discussion of her work on the connection between the parent companies of Westlaw and Lexis and immigration enforcement. Fascinating, right? Apparently the parent companies of our beloved research tools (Thompson Reuters, Reed Elsevier now RELX Group) have been losing money as legal information increasing becomes available online for free. They have found a new revenue stream in the data brokering market, selling data that drives law enforcement surveillance. Here are a few charts explaining the interconnection:

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Sarah's research alone is fascinating, but what's even more interesting is the response that she's received to her work: Westlaw and Lexis are, to put it politely, most displeased. In fact, the long-standing Lexis rep at CUNY was summarily replaced with a new rep who emailed all of Sarah's students, said she was a liar, and asked them report on anything she told them about Lexis. Yowzahs! My dear blog readers, this is a story I plan to cover again in the coming months.

Emily Ryo (USC) spoke about her amazing, interdisciplinary, empirical research (qualitative and quantitative) on (1) immigration enforcement and deterrence, (2) immigration courts and lawyers, and (3) the experience of non-citizens in removal proceedings. She discussed formulating questions for research as well as locating and collecting data to answer those questions. She spoke about her work as an expert helping with data driven policy discussion. Side note: I had the pleasure of sitting in on Emily's WIP to discuss her new work Jailing Immigrant Detainees concerning the characteristics of counties that have opted to participate in immigration detention (short version: small, rural, Republican counties in the South). Can't wait to see that one in print!

Michael Kagan (UNLV) talked about his interrelated work as a scholar, advocate, and activist. He discussed different models for blending (or isolating) these roles, and talked in particular about his role as a member of the Nevada Immigrant Coalition. It was fascinating to hear about the challenges he's faced and to have his encouragement to get more involved in local pro-immigration efforts. As he said, "This is a moment to be engaged."

Finally, Anil Kalhan (Drexel) talked a little about academics and social media. Check out this particularly apt slide:

IMG_9978

So true! Nevertheless, Anil encouraged us all to embrace social media, remembering to be generous in promoting the work of others. Anil also discussed the very serious topic of academic freedom, which, as he pointed out, is something we really shouldn't wait to become literate on until there is a crisis. Anil focused on the AAUP Statements on Principles of Academic Freedom and discussed ways in which immprofs might face challenges in their teaching (including clinic representation choices), scholarship, and public engagement (including social media). This is definitely a topic we need to think about as a community!

-KitJ

June 14, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 13, 2019

Emerging Immprof: Scenic Chairlift

Carolina Núñez has no peer when it comes to conference planning. At the end of day one of the 5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference, she gathered those interested and took us  on scenic lift ride at Sundance Mountain Resort. Check out these spectacular views.

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And here is my brave immprof chairlift cohort: Andy Ayers (Albany), Jill Family (Widener), and Stella Burch Elias (Iowa).

IMG_3378

Utah is stunning. I hereby nominate BYU to host in perpetuity.

-KitJ

June 13, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Emerging Immprof: Arc of Career for Immigration Law Teachers & Scholars

Screen Shot 2019-06-12 at 6.38.19 PM
Immprofs Rose Cuison Villazor, Sabrina Balgamalla, Carolina Núñez, Pooja Dadhania, and Sarah Rogerson

Our afternoon panel at the 5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference took a look a the career arc of an immprof.

Sabrina Balgamwalla (Wayne Law) moderated an energetic discussion of career trajectories.

Pooja Dadhania (Cal Western) offered helpful advice regarding staying zen while at the meat market (enjoy meeting new people, recognize hiring is a black box) and what's needed in the process (FAR, research agenda, references, publishable "WIP"). Wonderfully, Pooja has compiled a list of every question asked of her in the process -- reach out if you want a copy! She also discussed moving from clinical to doctrinal teaching and bringing experiential opportunities into the podium classroom.

Carolina Núñez (BYU) offered numerous tips about the tenure process that are so wonderful, I'm going to list rather than summarize them: 

  • Know when you're eligible for tenure and when you're not eligible anymore
  • Know exactly what the expectation for tenure is (read your rank-and-file document, talk to faculty about past decisions and what they're looking for)
  • Keep track of everything you do
  • Do a good job on your 3rd year review file, which can be the basis for your tenure file
  • Built a coherent story, brand
  • Get involved in the discipline beyond scholarship
  • Ask around about potential tenure reviewers
  • Think about concrete measures to improve teaching
  • Start earlier on your tenure file than you think you should
  • Use that 3rd year review file
  • Remember your two audiences: (1) the la school and (2) the university.
  • Know everyone at your school wants you to get tenure
  • Think about your post-tenure life and what you'll be doing

Sarah Rogerson (Albany) spoke about her journey into academia, following a push from co-panelist Rose! She talked about starting in a family violence clinic and working with law students who formed a pro bono immigration group. She regaled us with the improbable and inspiring story of how she got state funding to start an immigration clinic at Albany: knocking on the doors of state legislators, getting help from her institution, and working up a funding proposal.

Rose Cuison Villazor (Rutgers) talked about lateral academic moves from her own experience of securing tenure-track jobs at SMU, Hofstra, UC Davis, and Rutgers. She encouraged everyone to consider seriously head-hunting calls as they come in and to evaluate the benefits that might accrue from a move.

-KitJ

June 12, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 10, 2019

Emerging Immprof: Lunch Innovations

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It may be a bit unorthodox to talk about a conference lunch, but the Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference lunch merits mention. Here's why.

Inevitably at a conference, we end up talking to our friends. That's natural. We don't see each other often and it's a wonderful opportunity to catch up.

But we also need to broaden our networks and mentor emerging scholars. How can we do that if we never really get to know new people?

The answer: randomized lunch dates. All of our conference name tags had a photo of a book cover on the back. Those photos corresponded to tables, where we found the books -- all of which were related to immigration. And we were told that whoever graduated from high school (or its equivalent) the furthest from Provo could take the book home -- a terrific prompt that got us all talking. I managed to walk away with a copy of American Dervish. Score one for the Fighting Friars of Huntington, NY! AND I had the opportunity to meet immprof Katherine Reynolds who I'd not previously met.

I hope future conferences will consider this gentle nudge towards meeting new people.

-KitJ

June 10, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 8, 2019

Emerging Immprof: Teaching and Learning

IMG_8741
Immprofs Kayleen Hartman, Liz Keyes, Stella Burch Elias, Jill Family, Pooja Dadhania

The 5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars Conference kicked off with a panel on teaching & learning innovations in immigration law.

The panel was moderated by Pooja Dadhania, who just finished her first year of tenure track teaching at California Western and earned teacher of the year in that period! Way to go Pooja!

Kayleen Hartman (Loyola LA) spoke about: (1) Emily Robinson's bond project at Loyola LA , (2) Kayleen's own removal defense practicum, and (3) Kayleen's removal defense boot camp. It was amazing to hear about how both immprofs have been working to teach students to "fight from the back foot" in removal defense.

Liz Keyes (Baltimore) spoke about clinic design choices. She talked about focusing coursework on the unique needs of Baltimore's student population. In addition, she urged folks to recognize that "we as clinicians cannot solve the representation crisis" but instead must value our teaching -- training lawyers to go and do the work on their own.

Stella Burch Elias (Iowa) inspired us all with her work: (1) bringing practical skills and service to her immigration podium course and (2) creating an immigration symposium to meet the needs of the local immigration community. She also gave us the key to maintaining civility in a classroom that can become divided and divisive: "Remember, 10% of your grade is based on collegial participation."

Finally, Jill Family (Widener) spoke about (1) integrating policy developments into immigration law (in-class policy presentations, policy prompts), (2) her intersession course offering an introduction to immigration law practice, and (3) developing local relationships to give students more options. I super loved her emphasis that students can have any policy focus they want as long as it's supported with facts and reasons. There's no better lesson for law students.

-KitJ

June 8, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs, Teaching Resources | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 7, 2019

5th Biennial Emerging Immigration Scholars at BYU Law (June 7-8, 2019)

The 5th Biennel Immigration Scholars Conference will be held at BYU Law on June 7-8, 2019. This conference provides a forum for immigration law scholars to receive and provide constructive feedback on scholarship in a supportive setting; attend panel discussions that focus on teaching, scholarship, and other issues relevant to the early stages of a career as an immigration law scholar; and connect with colleagues from across the country. The conference is especially geared toward immigration law professors who have fewer than 10 years of experience in legal academia or who are pre-tenured.

This year's conference includes numerous works-in-progress sessions to foster immigration scholarship. In addition there will be panels on Teaching and Learning Innovations in Immigration Law (Moderated by Pooja Dadhania; Panelists: Stella Burch Elias, Jill Family, Liz Keyes, Emily Robinson), Arc of Career for Immigration Law Teachers & Scholars (Moderated by Sabrina Balgamwalla; Panelists: Rose Cuison Villazor, Pooja Dadhania, Carolina Núñez, Sarah Rogerson), New Frontiers in Immigration Law Scholarship (Moderated by Shalini Ray; Panelists: Michael Kagan, Anil Kalhan, Sarah Lamdan, Emily Ryo). The keynote luncheon on Keeping Up with Current Litigation will be given by Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia.

Thanks to conference organizers for continuing this beloved event!

- MHC

 

June 7, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 3, 2019

Administration of Immigration Law Research Roundtable (June 4-5, 2019 in Washington, DC)

The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of Administrative State will be hosting a two-part conference on The Administrion of Immigration. The first part will be a closed roundtable discussion held on June 4-5, 2019 at George Mason's Antonin Scalia Law School. It features presentations from the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Immigration on national security and the alien terrorist removal court, challenges to legal migration, civil denaturalization, deference in refugee cases, moral turpitude and immigration, e-Verify, and NEPA among other topics. Speakers include:

  • Julie Axelrod, Director of Litigation, Center for Immigration Studies
  • Timothy Belsan, Chief, National Security and Affirmation Litigation Unit, Office of
    Immigration, United States Department of Justice
  • Ming Hsu Chen, Associate Professor of Law and Faculty-Director, Immigration Law
    and Policy Society, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Law School
  • William W. Chip, Retired Senior Counsel, Covington & Burling LLP
  • Aram A. Gavoor, Senior Counsel for National Security, United States Department of
    Justice, and Visiting Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School
  • Michael Kagan, Joyce Mack Professor of Law, and Director of the UNLV Immigration
    Clinic, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
  • Andrew Kloster, Deputy Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the
    Administrative State
  • Craig Lerner, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University
  • Cassandra Burke Robertson, John Deaver Drinko - BakerHostetler Professor of Law,
    and Director, Center for Professional Ethics, Case Western Reserve University
    , School
    of Law
  • Christopher Walker, Associate Professor of Law, The Ohio State University, Moritz
    College of Law, and Director, The Moritz Washington, D.C. Summer Program
  • Adam J. White, Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the
    Administrative State and Assistant Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School,
    George Mason University

A second public convening will be held on October 25, 2019.

- MHC

June 3, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Citizenship Studies Call for Papers

Guest editors: Sharry Aiken and Stephanie J. Silverman.  First drafts are due on 30 June 2019

Recent scholarship on immigration detention diagnoses, dissects, and interprets the multiple meanings of detention sites, and what can be done about them. The discussion on why and how to abolish detention is virtually absent. The recent 'De-Carceral Futures' workshop invited scholars, practitioners, and people with lived experiences to discuss current and future worlds without immigrant incarceration. Some of the workshop's outputs are already available via a Policy Options podcast and the Queen's Faculty of Law's archiving the keynote plenary with Jonathan S. Simon and Harsha Walia

Key points for the Special Issue (SI) include: 
- detention’s complex relationships to other social movements;
- the underappreciated roles of women’s voices and actions in countering or resisting state violence;
- questions of global justice for local anti-detention actions;
- visions for alternative modalities of migration management that are not predicated on incarceration; 
- and the interconnections between liberty, legal status and citizenship 

Accordingly, the SI aims not to produce a consensus on ways to achieve migrant justice but will instead generate a potentially path-breaking space to explore different interpretations and implications of detention abolitionism.

Manuscript preparation guidelines: Your paper should be compiled in the following order: title page; abstract; keywords; main text introduction, materials and methods, results, discussion; acknowledgments; declaration of interest statement; references; appendices (as appropriate); table(s) with caption(s) (on individual pages); figures; figure captions (as a list). A typical paper should be no more than 8000 words, inclusive of references, figure captions, footnotes, endnotes. Any spelling style is acceptable so long as it is consistent within the manuscript. 

Please double space and submit as a Word document to: decarceralfutures@queensu.ca
If you are interested but might require additional time, please also get in touch.

For more information about submission requirements, see the Taylor and Francis Style
Guide: https://authorservices.taylorandfrancis.com/tf_quick_guide/

Any additional queries, comments, or questions to decarceralfutures@queensu.ca
 
KJ

May 28, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)