Thursday, December 5, 2019

Joseph A. Vail Asylum Law Workshop

Vail

The University of Houston Law Center Clinical Legal Education Program presents the Joseph A. Vail Asylum Law Workshop on Immigration Court Removal Proceedings and Appellate Litigation.  The keynote speaker is LORY ROSENBERG, FORMER MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF IMMIGRATION APPEALS.

KJ

December 5, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, November 30, 2019

Call for Papers: Michigan Law School 2020 Junior Scholars Conference

Juniorscholars

Michigan Law School 2020 Junior Scholars Conference
April 17-18, 2020
Call for Papers
Deadline for Submission: January 3, 2020

The University of Michigan Law School is pleased to invite junior scholars to attend the 6th Annual Junior Scholars Conference which will be held on April 17-18, 2020, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The conference provides junior scholars with a platform to present and discuss their work with peers and receive detailed feedback from prominent members of the Michigan Law faculty. The Conference aims to promote fruitful collaboration between participants and to encourage their integration into a community of legal scholars. The Junior Scholars Conference is intended for academics in both law and related disciplines. Applications from graduate students, SJD/PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers, lecturers, teaching fellows, and assistant professors (pre-tenure) who have not held an academic position for more than four years, are welcomed.

Submission

To apply to the conference, please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words reflecting the unpublished work that you wish to present and a copy of your CV through the online submission form by January 3, 2020. Please save all files as word documents in the following format:
LAST NAME – FIRST NAME – ABSTRACT/CV/FUNDING

Selection will be based on the quality and originality of the abstract as well as its capacity to engage with other proposals and to foster a collaborative dialogue. Decisions will be communicated no later than January 31, 2020. Selected participants will be required to submit final papers by March 16, 2020, so that they may be sent to your faculty commentator and circulated among participants in advance.

Financial Assistance

A very limited fund is available to help cover partial travel expenses and accommodation for selected participants. If you wish to be considered for financial assistance, please submit a separate written request through the online form specifying your city of departure and an estimate of travel costs. We regret in advance that we are unable to provide full financial assistance to participants.

Questions can be directed to the Organizing Committee Chair through the email address below.
Chun-Han Chen, Chair
University of Michigan Law School Center for International and Comparative Law
Junior Scholars Organizing Committee 200 Hutchins Hall, 625 South State Street
law-doconf@umich.edu Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1215, U.S.A.

KJ

November 30, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, November 14, 2019

An asylum officer blows the whistle on remain in Mexico

Greg Sargent of the Washington Post reports: "Tensions have been rising between asylum officers and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the agency that oversees the asylum system. And the union for asylum officers has already issued a legal brief condemning MPP amid litigation over the program. But this asylum officer’s personal indictment of the policy goes much further."

The Washington Post article details the disclosures of an anonymous "deeply dismayed asylum officer" who left his job “after careful consideration and moral contemplation.” The asylum officer wrote a remarkable manifesto that was obtained by Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), as part of Merkley's Congressional investigation of Trump’s asylum policies. The Merkley’s report, still forthcoming but previewed by Sargent for the article, will conclude that the administration has undertaken “systemic efforts” to “effectively rewrite U.S. asylum laws, rules and procedures,” with the overarching goal of “gutting the asylum system” but “without congressional approval or involvement.” Merkley’s report will also conclude that Trump’s policies have "intentionally inflicted trauma” on asylum seeking families.

Among the disclosures, the asylum officer impugns the program for furthering a racist agenda as its end:

The MPP both discriminates and penalizes. Implementation of the MPP is clearly designed to further this administration’s racist agenda of keeping Hispanic and Latino populations from entering the United States. This is evident in the arbitrary nature of the order, in that it only applies to the southern border. It is also clear from the half-hazard implementation that appears to target populations from specific Central American countries even though a much broader range of international migrants cross the southern border.

The officer also alleges that means are breaking down. Under MPP, if asylum seekers in U.S. territory declare in their initial interview a fear of being returned to Mexico, they’re supposed to get a second credible fear screening with a trained asylum officer. But the asylum officer charges that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services is being deliberately punitive by making it harder for applicants to succeed:

The implementation is calculated to prevent individuals from receiving any type of protection or immigration benefits in the future. As such, it is a punitive measure intended to punish individuals who attempt to request protection in the United States. There is no clearly established policy and system for notifying applicants of changes to hearing dates and times, or for the applicants to provide change of addresses to the courts and Border Patrol. Without a highly functional notice system, the administration has ensured that a high number of applicants will miss their court dates.
MHC

November 14, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

UC Davis Law Review Symposium: The 25th Anniversary of Proposition 187: Challenges and Opportunities for Immigrant Integration and Political Identity in California

191106-prop187-protest-al-1211_1d47b5f07853f1de85ed5201a2fac0f7.fit-2000w

Hundreds of protesters gather at Los Angeles City Hall, on Nov. 7, 1994, demonstrating against the so-called "Save Our State" proposition, Prop 187.Nick Ut / AP file

The UC Davis Law Review today continues a symposium on the 25th anniversary of California's immigration milestone, Proposition 187.  Here is the schedule.  There is room for anyone interested in attending.

California Proposition 187, passed in 1994, was the first modern anti-immigrant state legislation. While the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California invalidated the measure, the law’s effects on immigration policies and the Latinx community in California remain.

The UC Davis School of Law and UC Davis Law Review are hosting a panel and an academic symposium to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the passage of Prop. 187 on November 13-14, 2019. The panel will feature litigators who challenged Prop. 187 in the courts.

The academic symposium will discuss the influence Prop. 187 had on immigration at the state and federal levels, the political environment in California, and Latinx and immigrant communities in four panel discussions. 

A panel of distinguished activists yesterday opened the commemoration of the 25th Anniversary of Prop. 187. Litigators who challenged Prop. 187 in court and in the streets discussed their resistance strategies and lessons learned from their experiences for today’s anti-immigrant challenges. The speakers included Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF), Vibiana Andrade, General Counsel, Los Angeles County Office of Education, and Angie Wei, Chief Deputy Cabinet Secretary for Policy Development, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Office.  The moderator of the discussion was Maria Blanco, Executive Director, UC Immigrant Legal Services Center.

The schedule for today:

9:00 – 9:15 Welcome and Introductions

9:15 – 10:30 KEYNOTE: Thomas Saenz, President and General Counsel, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund

10:30 – 12:15  Panel 1:  The Effects of Prop. 187 on State and Federal Immigration Initiatives
Rick Su, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law
Rose Cuison-Villazor, Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School
Huyen Pham, Professor of Law, Texas A&M
Moderator: Shayak Sarkar, Acting Professor of Law, UC Davis School of Law

1:00 – 3:00  Panel 2:  Prop. 187, Political Participation and Identity
Kevin Johnson, Dean and Professor of Law, UC Davis School of Law
Rachel Moran, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
Lisa Garcia Bedolla, Vice-Provost, Graduate Studies, UC Berkeley
Marisa Abrajano, Professor, Political Science, UC San Diego
Oded Gurantz, Assistant Professor, Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri
Moderator: Robyn Rodriguez, Professor, Asian American Studies, UC Davis

3:00 – 4:30  Panel 3:  Social Integration and Welfare of Latinx and Immigrant Communities in the Wake of Prop. 187 and Today
Robert Irwin, Professor of Spanish, UC Davis School of Law
Giovanni Peri, Professor, Department of Economics, UC Davis
Beth Caldwell, Professor of Legal Analysis, Southwestern School of Law
Moderator: Leticia Saucedo, Professor of Law, UC Davis School of Law

 

In 2020, the UC Davis Law Review will be publiching papers presented at the conference.

KJ

November 14, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Podcast: The Battle of 187

187

 



This is California: The Battle of 187

A new podcast commemorates the 25th anniversary of Proposition 187, California's anti-immigrant initiative passed in 1994 by the Golden State's voters.

From the Los Angeles Times and Futuro Studios comes “The Battle of 187.” In this miniseries, reporter Gustavo Arellano breaks down how an anti-immigrant initiative that
passed 25 years ago in California turned the state into the progressive beacon it is today and
paved the way for Donald Trump to be elected president.

On November 13-14, the UC Davis Law Review is holding a 25th anniversary symposium on Proposition 187.

KJ

 

October 29, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Southeastern Immigration Studies Association Conference Paper Submissions due October 20

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Call for Proposals: LSA Pre-Conference Workshop on Citizenship and Migration and LSA Annual Meeting Papers for CRN2

The Law and Society Association's Annual Meeting will take place in Denver, Colorado. Calls for papers have been issued by the CRN2 Citizenship and Migration. In addition, the CRN2 and Colorado Immigration Scholars Network are jointly hosting a pre-conference workshop. See below for details.

 

CFP: LSA CRN2 Preconference Workshop

Members of the Law and Society Association’s Collaborative Research Network on Citizenship and Migration (CRN2) together with the Colorado Immigration Scholars Network invite applications to participate in a pre-conference to take place on Wednesday May 27, 2020 prior to the Law and Society Association annual meetings in Denver, CO. The purposes of the workshop are to build community among CRN members, and to provide close reads and feedback on works in progress in small groups led by discussants. The convening will run on May 27 from 12 to 7pm at CU Denver (near LSA hotel), with concurrent small sessions and a keynote by renowned immigration legal scholar Hiroshi Motomura, followed by a group dinner. Our hope is that this timing allows participants to fly in that morning if they want to minimize travel time.

To submit a proposal, fill out the form by December 15, 2019. https://forms.gle/CXo8iYy4KG5e9bGJA. If you are interested in serving as a discussant for a small group, please indicate that as well.

Questions may be directed to Ming Hsu Chen (University of Colorado Boulder), Edelina Burciaga (University of Colorado Denver), Lisa Martinez (University of Denver), Shannon Gleeson (Cornell University), Rebecca Hamlin (University of Massachusetts Amherst).

 

Law and Society Association Annual Meeting  - Proposals for CRN2 Citizenship and Migration

We’re writing with information about next year’s Law & Society Association conference, which will run between May 28th and May 31st in Denver, CO. It’s time to start thinking about your paper and panel submissions!

You can find information about the conference and different panel formats at the LSA Denver 2020 website. The submissions period will run between September 5th and November 6th (7pm ET). When submissions open on September 5th, a tab with submissions instructions will appear on the site.

For all submissions that address immigration and/or citizenship, please identify our collaborative research network, CRN02, during the submissions process. Doing so will reduce the number of concurrent panels and will make it easier for us to identify relevant panels on the final program.

Paper Sessions
We strongly encourage you to form full sessions and submit your papers together, as a Paper Session. Doing so will ensure that all papers on your panel are closely aligned thematically, which is less possible when we must create panels from individual paper submissions. For a paper session to be approved, you must have 4-5 Paper Presenters and a Chair and Discussant (which can be the same person). You will have an opportunity to indicate what CRN your submission "belongs" to -- please select CRN02.

If you have a paper session idea but need help identifying one or more papers, or a chair/discussant, please email us at CRN2.LSA@gmail.com by FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH. We will compile this information and send it out to the listserv by September 9th, so that you may connect with one another.

Individual Paper Submissions
If you choose to submit an individual paper, you will have an opportunity to indicate what CRN your submission "belongs" to -- please select CRN02.

Other Submissions
There are other formats you may wish to consider, including roundtable sessions, salon sessions, and/or Author Meets Reader (AMR) sessions. Note that the LSA selects and schedules AMRs and the CRN has no control over which books they select. This year, however, the CRN will host a session on “New Books in the Field.”

CRN02 “New Books in the Field”

Do you have a new book published in 2019 or (Jan-May) 2020? If so, we invite you to participate in a CRN02 panel featuring New Books in the Field. This panel will convene the authors of 6-8 recently published books and allow them to briefly talk about their work in a non-concurrent and section sponsored panel. Participation in this panel does not preclude one’s book from being considered for a separate AMR Session, and it does not count against LSA program participation limits. Please email Amada Armenta at armenta@ucla.luskin.edu by September 15th to be considered for this panel.

We look forward to seeing you all in Denver!

All our best,

CRN2 Organizers:
Amada Armenta, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, armenta@luskin.ucla.edu
Els de Graauw, Baruch College-CUNY, Els.deGraauw@baruch.cuny.edu
Hsiu-Yu (Tori) Fan, Soochow University School of Law, hsiuyufan@scu.edu.tw

October 16, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 19, 2019

CREEC Honors Cesar Garcia Hernandez for Challenging Discrimination

Garcia Hernandez

The Civic Rights Education and Enforcement Center (CREE) announces: "We're thrilled to announce César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández as the winner of CREEC's 2019 Challenging Discrimination Award! Intellectual, activist, teacher, and public commentator, César is a passionate and effective fighter for the rights of individuals and groups. His work creates change well beyond his immediate sphere of influence. We'll present César with his award at our Annual Event." Registration for the event is here.

WHEN: September 19th; 5:30-8:00pm

WHERE: History Colorado Center, 1200 Broadway, Denver, CO 80203.

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández is an associate professor at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and a frequent commentator in national and international media. He publishes crimmigration.com, a blog about the convergence of criminal and immigration law. César’s book, Migrating to Prison: America’s Obsession With Locking Up Immigrants, will be released in December 2019 by the social justice publisher The New Press. Congratulations, Cesar!

MHC

September 19, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 12, 2019

Brookings Institution Releases New Report Detailing How States Can Take Immediate Steps to Regulate Immigration Detention Facilities

Brookings_Institute_DC_2007

The Brookings Institution released a report this week that explores how state and local governments can take immediate steps to assert jurisdiction over detention facilities and craft more humane policies and processes that would improve America’s immigration system from the ground up.  

While local governments across the country have severed relationships with ICE detention facilities and state legislatures are passing bills opposing immigrant detention, the new Brookings report offers an alternative path for state and local governments with moral and ethical objections to current federal immigration enforcement policies.  

The lead author of the report, John Hudak said, “State governments play such a pivotal role overseeing and licensing the facilities that house the majority of ICE and HHS detainees, they can play a critical role in bringing sunlight to the immigration system—both by regulating state licensed facilities and giving voice to those housed within their walls.” 

The vast majority of adult immigration detainees—85%—are currently held in facilities that are not federal.  

The report outlines five specific steps state and local governments can take to start improving American immigration policy.

1.    Immediate investigations: In states where ICE detainees or unaccompanied minors detained by HHS are held in private or local facilities, state regulatory officials, social workers, lawyers, public health officials, and others can enter the facilities to enact a large-scale evaluation of the conditions in which people are held.

2.    Appoint a czar or coordinator to compile an interagency report: Governors can also appoint a “czar” or have a staff member designated as a policy coordinator overseeing the work of the agencies investigating both conditions in detention facilities and the health, welfare, and experience of those being detained.

3.    Disseminating information among stakeholders: Interested politicians, active and well-intentioned humanitarian organizations, and other nonprofits can only do so much. State governments are best positioned both to provide broader access for those interested groups, to coordinate efforts within and across states and then compile information and evidence in a systematic way.

4.    Statutory and regulatory review and strengthening: Attorneys general must order a review of each state agency’s statutory authority over immigrant detention, both of adults in ICE custody and of children in ORR shelters.

5.    Form an interstate working group: By coordinating among states via the National Governor’s Association, the National Association of Attorneys General, or other existing organizations that encourage the flow of information and expertise among states as peers, state officials can shift away from treating immigrant detention only as a problem in their backyard and begin to shift the norms of the system as a whole.

The complete report can be found here and was funded by the Seldin/Haring-Smith Foundation.  

KJ

September 12, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Central American Immigrants in the United States

In Central American Immigrants in the United States, Migration Information Source looks at the Central American population in teh United States.

While much attention has been paid to recent Central American arrivals at the U.S.-Mexico border, nearly half of the approximately 3.5 million Central Americans resident in the United States in 2017 arrived before 2000. About one-third are naturalized U.S. citizens, and they tend to participate in the labor force at a higher rate than foreign- and U.S.-born adults. Discover more about this population in this data-rich article.

From 1980 to 2017, the size of the Central American immigrant population grew approximately tenfold (see Figure 1). Since 1980, immigrants from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras accounted for the greatest increases in the Central American population, with each origin group growing by more than 1,350 percent by 2017. The other origin groups had much lower growth rates.

Figure 1

CentralAmericans2019-Fig1_UPDATED

KJ

September 3, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Law and Society Association's Citizenship and Migration CRN: CFP

Reposting message from the organizers of the LSA Citizenship and Migration announcing a call for papers for the 2020 annual meeting:

-

Dear Colleagues,


We’re writing with information about next year’s Law & Society Association conference, which will run between May 28th and May 31st in Denver, CO. It’s time to start thinking about your paper and panel submissions!

You can find information about the conference and different panel formats at the LSA Denver 2020 website. The submissions period will run between September 5th and November 6th (7pm ET). When submissions open on September 5th, a tab with submissions instructions will appear on the site.

For all submissions that address immigration and/or citizenship, please identify our collaborative research network, CRN02, during the submissions process. Doing so will reduce the number of concurrent panels and will make it easier for us to identify relevant panels on the final program.

Paper Sessions
We strongly encourage you to form full sessions and submit your papers together, as a Paper Session. Doing so will ensure that all papers on your panel are closely aligned thematically, which is less possible when we must create panels from individual paper submissions. For a paper session to be approved, you must have 4-5 Paper Presenters and a Chair and Discussant (which can be the same person). You will have an opportunity to indicate what CRN your submission "belongs" to -- please select CRN02.

If you have a paper session idea but need help identifying one or more papers, or a chair/discussant, please email us at CRN2.LSA@gmail.com by FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH. We will compile this information and send it out to the listserv by September 9th, so that you may connect with one another.

Individual Paper Submissions
If you choose to submit an individual paper, you will have an opportunity to indicate what CRN your submission "belongs" to -- please select CRN02.

Other Submissions
There are other formats you may wish to consider, including roundtable sessions, salon sessions, and/or Author Meets Reader (AMR) sessions. Note that the LSA selects and schedules AMRs and the CRN has no control over which books they select. This year, however, the CRN will host a session on “New Books in the Field.”

CRN02 “New Books in the Field”

Do you have a new book published in 2019 or (Jan-May) 2020? If so, we invite you to participate in a CRN02 panel featuring New Books in the Field. This panel will convene the authors of 6-8 recently published books and allow them to briefly talk about their work in a non-concurrent and section sponsored panel. Participation in this panel does not preclude one’s book from being considered for a separate AMR Session, and it does not count against LSA program participation limits. Please email Amada Armenta at armenta@ucla.luskin.edu by September 15th to be considered for this panel.

Finally, this year the CRN is collaborating with a group of immigration scholars from Colorado to host a pre-conference workshop on Citizenship and Migration in Denver on Wednesday, May 27th. A separate email with more information will arrive in the coming weeks.

We look forward to seeing you all in Denver!

All our best,

CRN Organizers:
Amada Armenta, UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, armenta@luskin.ucla.edu
Els de Graauw, Baruch College-CUNY, Els.deGraauw@baruch.cuny.edu
Hsiu-Yu (Tori) Fan, Soochow University School of Law, hsiuyufan@scu.edu.tw

 

September 3, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 27, 2019

Advocacy in Immigration Matters Program Application Due August 30

Posted on behalf of Michelle Mendez:

CLINIC has partnered with the National Institute for Trial Advocacy (NITA) since 2017 to offer “Advocacy in Immigration Matters,” a program for advocates working full-time for a non-profit immigration legal services provider.

The next CLINIC & NITA “Advocacy in Immigration Matters” will be held in Minneapolis, MN from October 17-19. A huge thank you to the University of St. Thomas School of Law for hosting us. The application deadline is 8/30. We will select applicants based on full-time employment at a non-profit, exclusive focus on immigration law, willingness to accept removal defense cases from their employer following this training, geographic location, and experience litigating at least one individual hearing. Please kindly share with your networks.

For those who do not fit this criteria, NITA will hold an “Advocacy in Immigration Matters” Public Program (meaning that this training is open to anyone for a higher fee), from October 23-25 in Boulder, CO.

More details: We completed the fifth NITA/CLINIC program in Boulder, Colorado from July 1-3 where we trained 39 advocates (chosen from over 100 applicants). The advocates represented 17 states, including Nebraska and South Dakota, and the following 31 organizations: Safe Passage Project; Neighborhood Defender Service of Harlem; Catholic Migration Services; ECBA Volunteer Lawyers Project, Inc.; Prisoners' Legal Services of New York; My Sisters' Place (NY); Catholic Migration Services; Rocky Mountain Immigrant Advocacy Network; Kids in Need of Defense; Immigrant Defenders Law Center; Public Counsel; Centro Legal de la Raza; Legal Services for Children; Dolores Street Community Services (CA); Multi-Cultural Center of Sioux Falls; Catholic Charities West Virginia; Legal Aid Society of Cleveland; Catholic Charities Dallas; Texas RioGrande Legal Aid; HIAS; Central West Justice Center; New Mexico Immigrant Law Center; Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy; Immigrant Legal Center; Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New Orleans; Michigan Immigrant Rights Center; Jacksonville Area Legal Aid; Catholic Charities of Central Florida; Colectiva Legal del Pueblo (WA); Northwest Immigrant Rights Project; and Metropolitan Public Defender (Portland, OR).

On the CLINIC faculty side, Bradley Jenkins, Vickie Neilson, Rebecca Scholtz and I had the honor of teaching with retired IJ Denise Slavin. On the NITA faculty side, seasoned litigators, including a federal public defender and a Denver District Court Judge, were completely devoted to helping the participants improve their skills.

August 27, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 16, 2019

Call for Papers--AILA Law Journal Spring 2020 Edition

AILA_Logo

The AILA Law Journal is seeking papers for its Spring 2020 edition.

Articles should run 4500-7000 words, lightly cited. All articles must be original. However, authors and columnists may reproduce their articles and columns, and place them on their websites, with attribution to and after publication in the AILA Law Journal.

All articles must be submitted via email in Word, as an attachment. All charts, graphs, and, tables should be typed or professionally typeset and must be submitted via email. Articles should not use extensive endnotes. Do not put citations in the text; rather, use endnotes only.

Submissions should include a clearly written, short author biography, author address, direct phone number, and email address. Authors should provide a two- or three-sentence summary of the article. Articles should be written in neutral, third-person voice. “You,” “I,” “We,” and similar terms are discouraged.

Articles must appear as continuous prose, with full sentences. Excessive use of quotation marks should be avoided. They should not be used when referring to a few ordinary words of a speaker or writer. They are appropriate for coined phrases, but only those that are unfamiliar, and only on first reference.

Submission Deadline: December 1, 2019

Submit to: ailalawjournal@aila.org

-KitJ

August 16, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

LatCrit/SALT Annual Faculty Development Workshop

Latcrit

The LatCrit, Inc./SALT Annual Faculty Development Workshop (FDW) will take place on October 17, 2019. The FDW will be held the day before the2019 LatCrit Biennial Conference “The Dispossessed Majority: Resisting the Second Redemption in América Posfascista (Postfascist America)” in Atlanta, Georgia.

The FDW is designed for those who are planning to enter or who have recently joined the legal academy.  The day-long workshop includes sessions on topics facing prospective, junior, and pre-tenured faculty, while providing generous opportunities to network and form mentoring relationships with established faculty. The FDW is an invaluable learning and professional development opportunity!

Registration for the FDW is free for attendees of the LatCrit conference. Please feel free to e-mail Professor Ron Hochbaum at rhochbaum@luc.edu with any questions. 

For more information about the LatCrit Conference, please visit http://latcrit.org/content/conferences/latcrit-biennial-conferences/2019-latcrit-biennial-conference-cfp/.

MHC

July 30, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 15, 2019

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5, 2020, 3:30-5:15PM · Washington, DC
(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at a session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for January 5, 2020 from 3:30-5:15PM. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Scaling the Invisible Wall: Restrictions on Legal Migration.”

This session will examine the “invisible wall,” a term that refers to non-statutory hurdles faced by legal immigrants. Executive branch actions at times meter access to legal immigration opportunities despite statutory opportunities. Changes in agency policy, changes in agency mood, or other phenomena can narrow the availability of legal opportunities for immigration. Examples of the invisible wall include preventing asylum seekers from accessing the border, increased denial rates of applications for legal status, and slower processing times of applications for legal status. The invisible wall implicates separation of powers principles because it questions the boundaries of executive branch enforcement. The invisible wall also challenges notions of transparency in administrative law to the extent that the invisible wall reflects changes in agency mood rather than written agency policy. It raises questions about how attorneys should respond to the challenges of the invisible wall. The invisible wall also highlights the need to explore the principles that should influence the design and governance of a legal immigration system.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission- Scaling the Invisible Wall.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Papers--AALS 2020, Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?

CALL FOR PAPERS
Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law January 3, 2020, 8:30-10:15AM · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for [TBD]. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?”.

Natural disasters and social conflicts spurred by deteriorating environmental conditions and climate change are driving people to move across borders. Economically disadvantaged communities, racial minorities and indigenous people are often in the first wave of displaced people in the world’s poorer countries. These same communities are also the most heavily impacted by pollution and environmental degradation in the places that they live and work in the United States. This panel will explore the issues of immigration and environmental regulation. How do environmental regulatory and deregulatory schemes in the U.S. impact immigrant communities? How have arguments about the effects of immigrants on the environment been used to restrict migration and the rights of migrants? How should existing domestic and international legal frameworks governing migration be revised to respond to environmentally motivated migration? How do (and how should) the rights of migrants figure into ongoing discussions and regulatory efforts around environmental justice at the domestic and international level? Do legislative proposals like the Green New Deal encompass and sufficiently address concerns of migrants?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

-KitJ

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Friday, January 3, 2020, 3:30pm-5:15pm · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for Friday, January 3, 2020, at 3:30pm.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2020: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 15, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project Lawsuit

ASAP Sues Government to Stop Deportations in Advance of ICE Raids

New York, NY — The Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) today joined the Central American Resource Center (CARECEN), Immigrant Defenders Law Center (ImmDef), and Public Counsel in suing the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security in an effort to stop the deportations of thousands of asylum seekers in danger of being arrested in raids rumored to begin this Sunday. ASAP and the other legal service providers bringing suit are represented by the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Southern California, New York Civil Liberties Union, and the law firm Munger, Tolles, & Olson LLP.

The lawsuit aims to protect the refugee families and children slated for deportation by the Trump Administration, most of whom have fled widespread violence in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and other countries at the hands of their governments, murderous gangs, and other transnational criminal networks. The complaint filed today argues that the constitution requires the government to bring unrepresented individuals before an immigration judge so they can have a fair day in court before they face deportation.

“Our government is attempting to detain and deport families who came to the Mexico-U.S. border seeking asylum, and who were never given the opportunity to even present their case before an immigration judge,” said Conchita Cruz, Co-Executive Director of the Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP). “For those seeking safe haven at the Mexico-U.S. border, deportation can be a death sentence. We must ensure each and every asylum seeker has their day in court.”

“The Trump Administration’s plan to arrest and deport thousands of Central American families and children without giving them a fair day in court is both illegal and immoral,” said Ahilan Arulanantham, senior counsel at the ACLU SoCal. “More than one hundred years ago, the Supreme Court decided that immigrants could not be deported without due process. These vulnerable refugees deserve that basic protection.”

The government asserts the power to deport these refugees without any hearing because they failed to appear in immigration court. However, as the lawsuit describes in detail, these refugees failed to appear because of massive bureaucratic errors and, in some cases, deliberate misdirection by immigration enforcement agencies. The agencies’ flagrant and widespread errors made it impossible for people to know when their hearings were being held.

As both legal services organizations and news agencies have repeatedly documented, the refugees’ notices to appear in court were sent to incorrect addresses; sent after hearing dates had already passed; issued for dates when courts were not in session; and in some cases for court dates that literally did not exist (such as weekends and September 31). For example, on January 31, 2019 alone, thousands of refugees lined up for hours at courts across the country with paperwork showing that date for their hearings, only to be told there would be no hearings that day. Many of them were ordered deported for failing to appear. These refugees are now a primary target of Trump’s impending mass arrests.

“The Trump administration’s threats against immigrants run roughshod over basic fairness and due process,” said Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. “For the many families who came here as refugees fleeing violence, deportation is a death threat. We will fight to ensure no one faces this kind of peril without having their case considered in court.”

“The Trump administration’s plan to send families and children who came to this country seeking refuge from violence and abuse in their home countries back to those places, without so much as one opportunity to show a judge they are entitled under U.S. law to stay, is fundamentally at odds with what this nation stands for,” said Brad Phillips, partner at Munger, Tolles, & Olson. “We hope by this lawsuit to stop the administration’s unlawful and inhumane plan in its tracks.”

The case was filed in U.S. District Court in New York, Southern District.

***

It's always fun to see my old law firm (Munger, Tolles) and partners I knew (woot, woot Brad Phillips!) doing exciting pro bono work.

If you want to see the actual paperwork, here is a link to the complaint.

-KitJ

July 11, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 8, 2019

Call for Papers--AALS 2020, Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?

CALL FOR PAPERS
Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law January 3, 2020, 8:30-10:15AM · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for [TBD]. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The session theme is “Immigration Control and Environmental Regulation: Toward Justice?”.

Natural disasters and social conflicts spurred by deteriorating environmental conditions and climate change are driving people to move across borders. Economically disadvantaged communities, racial minorities and indigenous people are often in the first wave of displaced people in the world’s poorer countries. These same communities are also the most heavily impacted by pollution and environmental degradation in the places that they live and work in the United States. This panel will explore the issues of immigration and environmental regulation. How do environmental regulatory and deregulatory schemes in the U.S. impact immigrant communities? How have arguments about the effects of immigrants on the environment been used to restrict migration and the rights of migrants? How should existing domestic and international legal frameworks governing migration be revised to respond to environmentally motivated migration? How do (and how should) the rights of migrants figure into ongoing discussions and regulatory efforts around environmental justice at the domestic and international level? Do legislative proposals like the Green New Deal encompass and sufficiently address concerns of migrants?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2019.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to jefamily@widener.edu with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and if so when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jill Family (jefamily@widener.edu) and Jennifer Chacón (chacon@law.ucla.edu).

-KitJ

July 8, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 28, 2019

Call For Papers--AALS 2020, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Friday, January 3, 2020, 3:30pm-5:15pm · Washington, DC

(Submission Deadline: August 15, 2019)

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 2-5, 2020. This session has been scheduled for Friday, January 3, 2020, at 3:30pm.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2019. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2020: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 28, 2019 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)