Saturday, October 17, 2020

James H. Binger Center Annual Immigration Law Forum

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Critical Conversations: Racial Justice and the Immigrant Rights Movement by University of Minnesota Law School's James H. Binger Center for New America

Date And Time:  Thursday, November 12, 2020, 7:00 AM – 3:00 PM PST, Add to Calendar

Location:  Online Event

The Binger Center’s Annual Immigration Law Forum brings together lawyers, students, advocates and community members to learn from each other and develop tools to continue the struggle to protect human rights, basic dignity and the rule of law.

This year’s forum will engage lawyers and advocates in critical conversations about race. Sessions will address historical lineages and systemic racism in the immigration system with a focus on anti-Blackness, the identity questions that surround how the immigrant rights movement is defined and intersects with other movements, and how community partners across sectors can come together to support noncitizens and advance racial justice. This online virtual conference will be interactive and action-focused, with sessions throughout the day followed by breakout discussions.

The goal of the forum is to empower participants to re-ground their work to invoke long term systemic change and build networks with advocates across the country.

Sessions include:

An Ongoing Crisis: Tracing the Confluence of Systemic Racism in US Law and Policy

-A. Naomi Paik, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

-Nekima Levy Armstrong, Wayfinder Foundation

Whose Story Gets Told: Exploring the Power of Identity in Intersecting Movements

-Alfreda Daniels, Black Immigrant Collective

-Kevin Reese, Voices for Racial Justice

-Emilia Gonzalez Avalos, Navigate MN

Community Action for Racial Justice and Movement Lawyering

-Paromita Shah, Just Futures Law

-Hiroshi Motomura, UCLA

-Tiffany Wilson-Worsley, Northside Achievement Zone

Conversations on How to Move Forward Post 2020 Election

Nana Gyamfi, Black Alliance for Just Immigration

Michele Garnett McKenzie, The Advocates for Human Rights

Jaylani Hussein, CAIR

KJ

October 17, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Citizenship in the Enforcement Era: A Policy Discussion

NPNA panel 10-14-2020

The New Americans Campaign will be hosting a policy discussion titled "Citizenship in the Enforcement Era" on Wed Oct 14, 2020 (12pm PT/1pm MT/2pm CT/3pm ET).  The discussion is inspired by my book, Pursuing Citizenship  in the Enforcement Era (Stanford Press 2020), and it will include policy analysis from think tanks and legal advocacy groups. Randy Capps will share findings from a survey on naturalization procedures conducted by the Migration Policy Institute and reported in A Rockier Road to Citizenship? report. A representative of Coalition for Humane Immigrants Rights (CHRLA) and CASA will discuss their successful campaign to enjoin the USCIS fee hikes that would have nearly doubled naturalization fees (the federal court injunction is here) and eliminated most fee waivers. Former USCIS Chief Counsel and DHS Watch leader Ur Jaddou will join as well. [UPDATED SPEAKERS 10/13/20]

The conversation will be moderated by Nicole Melaku, Executive Director for the National Partnership for New Americans. Register on FacebookLive.

MHC

October 13, 2020 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Critical Conversations: Racial Justice and the Immigrant Rights Movement by University of Minnesota Law School's James H. Binger Center for New America

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Critical Conversations: Racial Justice and the Immigrant Rights Movement by University of Minnesota Law School's James H. Binger Center for New America

The Binger Center’s Annual Immigration Law Forum brings together lawyers, students, advocates and community members to learn from each other and develop tools to continue the struggle to protect human rights, basic dignity and the rule of law.

This year’s forum will engage lawyers and advocates in critical conversations about race. Sessions will address historical lineages and systemic racism in the immigration system with a focus on anti-Blackness, the identity questions that surround how the immigrant rights movement is defined and intersects with other movements, and how community partners across sectors can come together to support noncitizens and advance racial justice. This online virtual conference will be interactive and action-focused, with sessions throughout the day followed by breakout discussions.

The goal of the forum is to empower participants to re-ground their work to invoke long term systemic change and build networks with advocates across the country.

Date and Time

Thu, November 12, 2020

7:00 AM – 3:00 PM PST

Annual Immigration Law Forum

Critical Conversations: Racial Justice and the Immigrant Rights Movement

Thursday, November 12th

9am-5pm
Virtual Through Zoom

Register Here

Sessions will address historical lineages and systemic racism in the immigration system with a focus on anti-Blackness, the identity questions that surround how the immigrant rights movement is defined and intersects with other movements, and how community partners across sectors can come together to support noncitizens and advance racial justice

 

Featuring

 

A. Naomi Paik is the author of Bans, Walls, Raids, Sanctuary: Understanding U.S. Immigration for the 21st Century. She is an associate professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and the IPRH-Mellon fellow in Legal Humanities, and the Center for Advanced Studies Resident Associate for the Initiative on “Abolition.” Her research and teaching interests include comparative ethnic studies; U.S. imperialism; U.S. militarism; social and cultural approaches to legal studies; transnational and women of color feminisms; carceral spaces; and labor, race, and migration. 

 

Nana Gyamfi is the Executive Director of Black Alliance for Just Immigration, the largest Black-led racial justice and immigrant rights organization in the U.S. representing Black Immigrants, refugees and their families. A movement attorney for over 25 years, Nana is co-founder of Justice Warriors 4 Black Lives and Human Rights Advocacy, organizations dedicated to fighting for human rights and Black liberation. She is a former professor in the Pan African Studies Department at California State University Los Angeles. 

 

Paromita Shah is the Executive Director of Just Futures Law. Her work specializes in strategies to combat immigration detention, enforcement and criminalization. With over twenty years of experience, she has provided innovative legal and advocacy support to lawyers and legal advocates, grassroots groups, organizers, and policy stakeholders fighting criminalization and immigration enforcement. Previously, she worked as a staff attorney at Greater Boston Legal Services representing individuals seeking asylum, VAWA and other relief. 

Questions about the event can be directed to Cnalaw@umn.edu

KJ

October 8, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Emerging Immigration Scholars Workshop at UCLA/UCSD

UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration and the UCSD Center for Comparative Immigration Studies will be holding a multi-part workshop for emerging immigration scholars. They seek to create an interdisciplinary space for junior immigration scholars to share drafts of their research and writing projects and to connect with one another and senior scholars working the field.

  • Proposals include a 5-page prospectus or draft and can be submitted here. Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2020.
  • Workshops will be held on January 15, 29; February 12, 26; and March 12 with papers due 10 days prior to each workshop.

For more information, contact Warren Tam.

October 7, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Papers: Winter 2021 Emerging Immigration Scholars Workshop

Photo for Emerging Immigration Scholars Workshops Winter

These workshops, organized by the UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration and the UCSD Center for Comparative Immigration Studies, seek to create an interdisciplinary space for junior immigration scholars to share drafts of their research and writing projects and to connect with one another as well as senior scholars working in the field.

The workshops, to be held remotely on zoom, will consist of a series of two-hour sessions, held every other Friday from 12-2 p.m., starting on January 15. Each workshop will feature three papers, to be available for reading ahead of the session, with a comment from a senior migration scholar on the faculty at either UCSD or UCLA. The workshops will be open to emerging immigration scholars, including post-doctoral fellows and tenure-track and non-tenure track faculty who have held professorial positions for eight years or fewer.

The workshops seek to attract presenters working in a broad range of social science fields, as well as those in ethnic studies, law, public health, urban planning, public policy, environmental studies/science, and social welfare. The workshops are designed to allow for intensive discussion and constructive criticism of papers that may still be in the in-process stage. Papers submitted for works-in-progress sessions should range from 25 to no more than 40 (double-spaced) pages in length.

The workshops will also be open to participants who may not have a paper to present. However, the expectation in any workshop is that all participants will be expected to be able to comment on papers discussed in that session.

As we seek to make this an experience that will help build community among migration scholars, notwithstanding the limits imposed by the remote environment, we expect that paper writers will participate in all five sessions, not simply the one in which their paper is featured, and faithfully read all the papers.

Interested presenters are requested to submit the following: a draft paper or a 5-page prospectus and CV. Materials can be uploaded here.

The deadline for submissions is November 1, 2020. Decisions will be made by no later than December 1, 2020. Presenters will then be asked to register ten days following notification of acceptance.

The workshops will be held on January 15, 29; February 12, 26; and March 12. Papers will be due ten days before each workshop. For more information, please contact Warren Tam at w2tam@ucsd.edu.   

IE

October 7, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 25, 2020

Citizenship and Suffrage: Race, Citizenship and Women's Right to Vote

American University Washington College of Law will be hosting a virtual event on October 6 from 5pm-6:30pm ET entitled Citizenship and Suffrage: Race, Citizenship, and Women’s Right to Vote on the Centennial of the 19th Amendment. The event discusses how citizenship acquisition and citizenship stripping rules barred women from voting even after the 19th Amendment’s ratification. It will also discuss citizenship-related barriers to the vote today. 

The event features Professors Rose Cuison-Villazor, Leti Volpp, Kunal Parker, and Maureen Edobor from the League of Women Voters. Professor Amanda Frost will be be moderating. 

To register, please visit: https://www.wcl.american.edu/secle/registration

MHC

September 25, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of Migrants, Refugees, and UAC

The Inter-American Commission has released the Hearings Calendar. The hearing to discuss the human rights situation of migrants, refugees, and unaccompanied children will take place on October 9, 2020 at 14:00 EST.

The panelists will be: Bill O. Hing (USF), Nicole Ramos (Al Otro Lado), Laura Pena (Non-Profit Immigration Attorney), Ismael Moreno Coto - Padre Melo (Director of Radio Progreso- Honduras) , and Beth Lyons. 

You can find the petition submitted in July to request the hearing here. To attend the hearing please REGISTER HERE or you could also watch it through the CIDH Facebook page.    Additionally, there will be an online Q&A session right after the hearing for members of the press, orgs, and others and a twitter "Hour of Action" campaign. More information on those two events to come. 

September 22, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, August 27, 2020

Call for Papers: AILA Law Journal, Spring 2021 Edition

AILA

The AILA Law Journal has issued a call for papers for it's Spring 2021 edition.

Submission Guidelines: Articles should run 4,500–7,000 words, lightly cited. All articles must be original. However, authors and columnists may reproduce their articles and columns, and place them on their websites, with attribution to and after publication in the AILA Law Journal.

All articles must be submitted via email in Word, as an attachment. All charts, graphs, and, tables should be typed or professionally typeset and must be submitted via email. Articles should not use extensive endnotes. Do not put citations in the text; rather, use endnotes only.

Submissions should include a clearly written, short author biography, author address, direct phone number, and email address. Authors should provide a two- or three-sentence summary of the article. Articles should be written in neutral, third-person voice. “You,” “I,” “We,” and similar terms are discouraged.

Articles must appear as continuous prose, with full sentences. Excessive use of quotation marks should be avoided. They should not be used when referring to a few ordinary words of a speaker or writer. They are appropriate for coined phrases, but only those that are unfamiliar, and only on first reference.

Submission Deadline: November 15, 2020

Submit to: ailalawjournal@aila.org

If you have questions, contact Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, the Editor-in-Chief, or Danielle Polen, Editor, of AILA Law Journal (dpolen@aila.org).

-KitJ

August 27, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 11, 2020

AALS Schedule -- Immigration Panels

AALS has circulated a preliminary schedule for the 2021 Annual Conference, which will be virtual this year. Here are some important dates to calendar: 

  • Wednesday January 6, 4:15-5:30 (Eastern): New Voices in Immigration Law
  • Thursday January 7, 1:15-2:30 (Eastern): Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

-KitJ

August 11, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2020

Saturday Deadline: Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2021 AALS conference, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

August 10, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday Deadline: Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

August 10, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 1, 2020

Changing Technology in Immigration Court: COVID-19 and Beyond, Free Webinar

Webinar

Texas A&M University School of Law is offering a free webinar that will explore the changing role of technology in immigration courts, including the use of remote adjudication, telephonic appearances by counsel, and electronic filing. Additionally, the webinar will examine possible ways that technology can be used to expand access to counsel and help address the backlog of immigration cases. The panelists will discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with various technologies such as remote adjudication from the perspectives of attorneys representing immigrants, counsel with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, an immigration judge, and academics. The webinar will consider not only how the COVID-19 pandemic spurred technological changes, but also any potential long-term impact of those changes. During this one-hour webinar, attendees will be able to ask questions.

Presenters

  • Daniel Bleiberg, Associate, Jones Day, Laredo Project
  • Robert Dunikoski, Deputy Chief Counsel for Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Dallas, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  • Ingrid Eagly, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
  • Luz Herrera, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Experiential Education, Texas A&M School of Law
  • The Honorable Hugo Martinez, Assistance Chief Immigration Judge, Fort Worth Immigration Adjudication Center
  • Moderator: Fatma Marouf, Professor of Law and Immigrant Rights Clinic Director, Texas A&M School of Law

IE

August 1, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2021 AALS conference, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 28, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 28, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 24, 2020

The Impact of the Coronavirus Crisis on Immigrants and Immigration: What to Know and How to Help

Cornell

The Impact of the Coronavirus Crisis on Immigrants and Immigration; What to Know and How to Help, Thursday, July 30, 2020, 3pm EDT

Event Overview

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted the immigration system and the people attempting to navigate it in significant ways. Immigrants already in the U.S. who think they may have the coronavirus are afraid to go to hospitals for testing or treatment, fearing the threat of INS agents. Noncitizens in immigration detention centers are getting sick and dying because of the cramped and unsanitary conditions. Meanwhile, those seeking to enter the U.S. face heightened barriers: The federal government has temporarily suspended new immigrant visas and imposed travel restrictions on travelers from China and other countries. Most State Department embassies are closed, making it impossible for people to get visas or for employers to bring in needed workers.

Join Cornell Law School professors Stephen Yale-Loehr and Jaclyn Kelley-Widmer, along with student attorney Camilah Hamideh, for a discussion on how the immigration system is functioning in the wake of the pandemic, including ways to advocate for those tangled in its red tape.

This event is co-sponsored by the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies and Migrations: A Global Grand Challenge.

PENDING: Attendees may be eligible to receive 1 NY CLE credit in the area of Professional Practice. This program is appropriate for both transitional and non-transitional attorneys.

What You'll Learn

The executive actions on immigration issued by the current administration during the pandemic How COVID-19 is impacting immigration courts and detention centers Visa suspension issues and border closures for international workers, students, and leisure travelers How to engage in immigration advocacy

Speakers

Stephen Yale-Loehr Professor of Immigration Law Practice Cornell Law School Camilah Hamideh Student Attorney, Cornell Law Clinical Programs Cornell Law School Jaclyn Kelley-Widmer Associate Clinical Professor of Law Cornell Law School

Register Now

KJ

July 24, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 23, 2020

The Racial Roots of the Federal Administrative State, by Jonathan Weinberg

Jonathan Weinberg's contribution to the Yale JREG Symposium on Racism and Administrative Law addresses bureaucratic mainfestations of racism over the course of U.S. history. He begins with the Fugitive Slave Act and devotes the bulk of his essay to the Chinese Exclusion Act. His conclusion: "We can see, in other words, the seeds of nearly all of modern administrative law in the administration of Chinese exclusion."

His essay is here; the full list of contributors is listed in a previous immprof blog post here. A running list of immigration scholars still to come: Kit Johnson, Bijal Shah, Shruti Rana [will update as the symposium continues its weekly postings.]

MHC

July 23, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Immigration, Trump, and COVID-19

Today at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) national virtual conference, I had the opportunity to attend a terrific panel titled “Year Four of the Trump Administration: What’s Happened, What’s to Come, and How COVID-19 Has Impacted Immigration Policy in the U.S.” This timely panel covered much ground in collecting and analyzing the huge number of immigration policy changes that have taken place during the COVID-19 pandemic. Royce Bernstein Murray of the American Immigration Council (AIC) moderated the panel and here are some of the interesting highlights from the panelists:

  • Jorge Loweree, Policy Director at AIC, discussed how the administration has pursued sweeping immigration policy changes during the COVID-19 pandemic, at times using the pandemic to justify these changes, such as with Presidential Proclamation 10014 suspending the entry of certain nonimmigrants.
  • Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, Policy Counsel, at AIC focused his remarks on the impact of COVID-19 on U.S. immigration courts, including the widespread health concerns raised by the opening of detained immigration courts during the pandemic.
  • Kathryn Shepherd, National Advocacy Counsel at AIC, called attention to the dangerous conditions inside immigrant detention centers during the pandemic and a recent oversight complaint filed by AIC and other groups that brings to light the challenges that people are facing in ICE detention in the pandemic.

 

IE

July 22, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Stakeholder Town Hall Meeting Hosted by National Association of Immigration Judges (NAIJ)

The National Association of Immigration Judges (NAIJ) is inviting stakeholders to participate in a virtual town hall meeting on Wednesday, July 22nd at 8 p.m. ET to discuss the challenges facing judges, staff, counsel, respondents, and the public during the Executive Office for Immigration Review’s reopening of the immigration courts. Stakeholders can submit questions in advance of the meeting, and can also request an opportunity to speak.

To RSVP for the meeting, fill out this form by Wednesday, July 22nd at 3:00 p.m. ET.

Relevant to NAIJ's recent work is a grievance that NAIJ filed on July 8, 2020 outlining concerns about immigration court operations during COVID-19. 

IE

July 21, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 29, 2020

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 29, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 29, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)