Wednesday, June 15, 2022

Being an Immigrant With Disabilities

A new Urban Institute report (Being an Immigrant with Disabilities) offers information about immigrants with disabilities, a group often ignored in the discussion of immigrants and immigration.

Drawing on five-year estimates from the 2015–19 American Community Survey, this Urban Institute brief provides a snapshot of select characteristics of nonelderly immigrants with disabilities, ages 18 to 64, to underscore the structural challenges this population faces. 

Immigrants with disabilities face multiple structural challenges, including discrimination, socioeconomic disadvantage, and barriers to safety net access.  

Overall, 5.6 percent of nonelderly immigrants have a disability. Disaggregation by race and ethnicity shows us that this prevalence is highest among nonelderly Black Latinx immigrants at 10.2 percent and lowest for non-Latinx Asian immigrants at 4.2 percent.

KJ

June 15, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2023, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Wednesday, January 4 – Saturday, January 7, 2023 (session timing TBD) · San Diego, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting which will take place in San Diego, CA January 4-7, 2023. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it.

This session will be structured as a works-in-progress discussion, rather than as a panel. Selected papers will be discussed in turn, with time for author comments, thoughts from a lead reader, and group discussion.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own annual meeting registration fee.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2022. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2023: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 15, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2023, Racism in Immigration Regulation

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Racism in Immigration Regulation”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 4, 2023 – January 7, 2023 (session yet to be scheduled)
San Diego, California

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at a session during the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, which will take place January 4-7, 2023. The session day and time will be added to this post when available. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The AALS conference theme is “How Law Schools Can Make a Difference,” and the session theme is “Racism in Immigration Regulation.”

Scholars are engaging in long overdue and important conversations about racial justice in the United States. U.S. law and institutions, many have recognized, harbor systemic biases that result in profound racial inequalities. U.S. immigration law and policy are no exception. From the era of Chinese Exclusion to modern distinctions in the treatment of Central American, African, Haitian, and Ukrainian asylum seekers, race has proved to be an important factor in migrants’ access to and experience immigrating to the United States. This historical trajectory raises questions that can inform broader conversations about systemic racism: How should we approach a legal regime with explicitly racist foundations? How does the expressly exclusionary function of immigration regulation affect its application to different groups? What role does the discretion inherent in enforcement of immigration law play in its effect?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2022. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2022.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to nunezc@law.byu.edu with the subject “AALS Submission- Racism in Immigration Regulation.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and, if so, when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Carolina Núñez (nunezc@law.byu.edu).

June 15, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Call For Papers -- The Federal Lawyer magazine

Cover

The Federal Lawyer magazine is planning an upcoming immigration themed issue, and invites contributions (including and even especially from students) who would like to propose and write articles.

The Federal Lawyer is a legal magazine, with a "law review light" format. Their writing guidelines are at this link.

Articles typically range 3,000-8,000 words. Authors should submit a 2-3 sentence bio and a headshot with their submission, to social@fedbar.org.

 

June 14, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Call for Papers: International Migration Review Seeking Book Review Essays

The International Migration Review will start publishing book review essays this year. These essays discuss two to five books on a common theme. They are designed to give the reviewer ample room for analytical and comparative reflections and are a vital element for synthesizing new trends and insights in migration studies. 

In addition to commissioning such review essays, IMR invites submissions of book review essays, particularly by early career or Global South scholars. 

The deadline for submitting the review essays toKatharina Natter (k.natter@fsw.leidenuniv.nl) is July 30, 2022. More detailed instructions for reviewers appear here, including that books reviewed should have been published in the past 2-3 years (i.e. 2020-2022).

MHC

June 11, 2022 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Live'ish from Loyola LA's ILSTW 2022: Critical Approaches to Immigration Law

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The last plenary panel of ILSTW 2022 was titled "Critical Approaches to Immigration Law."

Kathleen Kim, the panel moderator, kicked off the program by posing two questions to the panelists: (1) What is the focus and objective of your scholarship?; and (2) How does critical legal theory and related theoretical frameworks affect your work?

Daniel Morales talked about his goal of demystifying immigration law, exposing the truth about how it operates and who it benefits. He highlighted the many tools of critical theory that have helped in his research: legitimacy, power knowledge, consciousness raising, and non-reformist reform.

Kathy Abrams spoke about her relatively new focus on immigration law and her work regarding immigration activism. In terms of critical theory, she emphasized the importance of considering (1) the role of experiential storytelling, and (2) the agency of an oppressed group. She offered many concrete examples from her work regarding activists in Phoenix.

Ming Hsu Chen (our wonderful blog co-editor!) talked about her work on citizenship and the tension between seeing the benefits of formal citizenship and recognizing that for some (particularly the "racialized foreigner") inequalities continue even after formal citizenship is gained. I found particularly intriguing her observation that the U.S. recognizes the gap between the reality facing black and white Americans, and it is striving to close that gap. Yet the gap facing racialized foreigners is simply accepted.

Jen Lee talked about the radical changes that she's seen in immigration activism over the course of her career -- from a focus on achieving relief through subfederal changes to a demand to blow up the system entirely. She emphasized the importance of looking to social movements where critical approaches are generated in a "dialectical relationship between the practical and re-imagined." 

Discussion after these introductory remarks flowed freely, covering the pitfalls of approaches grounded in critical theory, the role of immigration law teaching and scholarship, the rise of white power, and the rise of authoritarianism.

-KitJ

June 7, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Live from Loyola: Immigration Law Teacher and Scholars Workshop 2022 Opening Plenaries

The Immigration Law Teachers and Scholars Workshop 2022 opened with a thought-provoking opening plenary, "Beyond Resistance and the Future of Immigration Law." Moderated by Kathleen Kim. the panelists initially shared how their work reflects on resistance.

Setting a vision for the future of immigration law, Tedayi Achiume, UCLA Law School, described herself as an international lawyer and urged a more transnational perspective on borders in immigration law. Such a perspective would take empire seriously and understand borders in the context of colonization. These historical roots explains borders as a "technology of control and exploitation" that "binds individuals and institutions across time and space in ways that suppress self-detemrination for some for the benefit of others." She admitted that this future may be hard to see given that tranationalism activism has been dampened in efforts for reform. (See Racial Borders and Migration as Decolonization for a more detailed account of these arguments.)

Hiroshi Motomura offered the example of migrants of who fall between the cracks of asylum law and refugee protections to illustrate the limits of existing immigration laws in the effort for global justice. The problem, he noted, is that advancing individual rights does not go to the root problems of economic domination or racism. For example, Title 42 has been used by both the Biden and Trump administrations to block migrants from seeking asylum under the pretense of a public health emergency. But even if Title 42 is lifted, Motomura notes that migrants are left with the asylum system that is itself riddled with problems. (See The New Migration Law for a glimpse of his in-progress book elaboating these ideas.)

Amanda Frost provided an concrete example of how one might envision the obligations of the federal government to its own colonized people: reparative citizenship. She describes the practice of giving citizenship as "reparation for past wrongdoings of the government," such as systemic and explicit discrimination against harmed groups such as the Japanese interned during World War II or Mexicans during the 1980s IRCA legalization. She sketched concrete ways the U.S. institutions could implement a broad model of reparations, such as shifting the burden of proof in deportation of individuals who were once caught up in Operation Wetbank and allocating visas in a way that takes account of historically included groups. On the question of political feasibility, she encouraged immigration advocates to not limit their imagination: the U.S. has had limited programs before and  France, Germany, and other European nations have more recently repaid debts this way. 

Angelica Chazaro picked up the scope of reform and issued a provocative challenge, "There is no beyond the resistance. The only response is resistance" to the carceral state. Recognizing the value of efforts to make the immigration system run better -- to enhance due process for immigrants in the form of expanding access to counsel, for example -- Chazaro emphasized "there is no just immigration enforcement." That being the case, she urged immigration advocates to not limit the scope of their resistance. She cautioned against promoting federally funded access to counsel, citing the trajectory of federally-funded legal services and the levers of control that resulted, such as the ban on political advocacy. The upshot is to limit the scope of reform and to give up on the end goal of abolition that defunds ICE and ends detention and deportation. (For more, see The End of Deportation.)

A lively discussion flowed from Kathleen Kim's question to the panelists about how to be a progressive in an immigration system that is so deeply illegitimate and during a time when the bounds of morality are tested, especially around race.

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A second plenary session, Teaching Towards Justice with Immigration Law, featured reflections on the ABA's revised standard 303 to shape students’ professional identities focused on an obligation to care for clients and the recognition of cultural competency and elimination of bias in law. Moderated by Kevin Lapp, the panelists included Mariela Olivares, Lindsay Harris, Angela Banks and Kathleen Kim.

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For more about the ILTSW, co-editor KitJ blogged about papers to keep an watch for during the works-in-progress sessions here.

MHC

 

June 7, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Live'ish from Loyola LA's ILSTW 2022: Papers To Keep A Watch Out For

Yesterday was the first full day of conferencing at the biennial (though much delayed) immprof conference (ILSTW 2022). I attended WIP sessions for a number of very fascinating pieces. Check it out:

Ahilan Arulanantham, Towards a Theory of Preventative Detention. In this piece, Ahilan explores the history of preventative detention practices, including quarantines, civil commitments, pre-trial, national security and immigration. He notes that, historically, preventative detention was not acceptable to deter crime. Given that, he argues that preventative detention today should be limited to situations "where the conduct it seeks to prevent cannot be punished under criminal law." That is, it should not be based on "public safety," which so frequently is the modern explanation for immigration detention.

Paulina Arnold, How Immigration Detention Became Exceptional. Paulina, like Ahilan, is interested in immigration detention. She presents historical evidence that the detention of immigrants was "a central part of civil incarceration at its inception." Among her fascinating factual nuggets is this: "in the St. Louis Workhouse in 1855, at a time when immigrants represented 13% of Missouri's population, they comprised 90% of the workhouse population." Paulina's work moves through 19th century civil incarceration, through the birth of immigration detention, to the dramatic reduction of civil incarceration (that somehow missed immigration), to immigration detention today. She presents constitutional law arguments regarding "civil carceral law."

Alina Das discussed an early idea -- exploring whether the Accardi doctrine (that agencies must follow their own rules when acting) could help individuals in detention vindicate more of their rights. This paper offers real promise given the litany of "rights" that immigrants in detention are supposed to have yet are prohibited from accessing.

Emily Torstveit Ngara, Cruel and Unusual Penalty? The Use of Punitive Solitary in Civil Immigration Detention. Emily has been long interested in the regular use of solitary confinement in immigration detention to both "protect" (as in the case of trans and LGBTQ migrants) and to punish for disciplinary infractions. This piece will explore the latter context, looking at the practices, harms, and legal challenges to solitary confinement.

Eunice Lee, Immigration in the Shadow of Death. Eunice is exploring the United States' "tolerance of undue risk of mortality" throughout the immigration system, including: border wall deaths, desert crossing deaths, cross border shootings, detention deaths, deaths resulting from Title 42 expulsions, and deportation to death. Individually, you might be aware of each of these areas but putting them all together sharply highlights, as Eunice writes, the "core assumption that immigrant lives matter less than citizens' lives."

Ana Pottratz AcostaAn Examination of Public Benefit Enrollment Data from Minnesota as Evidence of Public Charge Chilling Effect Within Immigrant Communities. In this empirical piece, Ana will examine enrollment data for means tested public benefits programs in Minnesota to see if decreased enrollment followed the publication of draft and final public charge regulations. Empiricists -- reach out and give Ana the skinny on this type of work! 

Alan Hyde, Our Immigration Narrative: What and How. Alan is sitting on a self-proclaimed "unpublishable book" (I disagree about this characterization) that calls for the creation of a vision for immigration law that might help shape future litigation and legislation.

***

If you're interested in these papers, I highly recommend that you reach out to the authors. I'm sure they've love to brainstorm with you and hear ideas & comments!

-KitJ

June 7, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Law Review Articles & Essays | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 2, 2022

Call For Papers--AALS 2023, Racism in Immigration Regulation

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Racism in Immigration Regulation”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 4, 2023 – January 7, 2023 (session yet to be scheduled)
San Diego, California

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at a session during the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, which will take place January 4-7, 2023. The session day and time will be added to this post when available. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The AALS conference theme is “How Law Schools Can Make a Difference,” and the session theme is “Racism in Immigration Regulation.”

Scholars are engaging in long overdue and important conversations about racial justice in the United States. U.S. law and institutions, many have recognized, harbor systemic biases that result in profound racial inequalities. U.S. immigration law and policy are no exception. From the era of Chinese Exclusion to modern distinctions in the treatment of Central American, African, Haitian, and Ukrainian asylum seekers, race has proved to be an important factor in migrants’ access to and experience immigrating to the United States. This historical trajectory raises questions that can inform broader conversations about systemic racism: How should we approach a legal regime with explicitly racist foundations? How does the expressly exclusionary function of immigration regulation affect its application to different groups? What role does the discretion inherent in enforcement of immigration law play in its effect?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2022. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2022.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to nunezc@law.byu.edu with the subject “AALS Submission- Racism in Immigration Regulation.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and, if so, when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Carolina Núñez (nunezc@law.byu.edu).

June 2, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

June 7 in Los Angeles -- From Deterrence to Integration: Civil Society Voices on Migration Policy Challenges and Good Practices in the Americas

From Deterrence to Integration: Civil Society Voices on Migration Policy Challenges and Good Practices in the Americas
Tuesday, June 7, 2022
5:00-6:30PM
Omni Los Angeles, California Plaza, Bradbury Rose Room

Summit migration side event

June 2, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 23, 2022

Call For Papers--AALS 2023, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Wednesday, January 4 – Saturday, January 7, 2023 (session timing TBD) · San Diego, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting which will take place in San Diego, CA January 4-7, 2023. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it.

This session will be structured as a works-in-progress discussion, rather than as a panel. Selected papers will be discussed in turn, with time for author comments, thoughts from a lead reader, and group discussion.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own annual meeting registration fee.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2022. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2023: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

May 23, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 20, 2022

Workshop in Honour of Joseph Carens

The University of Toronto will host a workshop in honour of Joseph Carens: "Multiculturalism, Membership, and Citizenship" on June 3, 2022. VIRTUAL/IN-PERSON. 

Carens workshop

May 20, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 19, 2022

How the FBI Aided and Abetted the Rise of White Christian Nationalism

Stanford's Center for the Comparative Study of Race & Ethnicity is hosting a timely presentation on hate crime. The lecture will be delivered by Lerone A. Martin, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute, and focus on his book, The Gospel of J. Edgar Hoover, which is a groundbreaking new history of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The post-lecture discussion will be moderated by Jennifer Burns, Associate Professor of History.
 
Historian Lerone A. Martin reveals how J. Edgar Hoover and his FBI teamed up with leading white evangelicals and Catholics to make the FBI a squadron of white Christian soldiers trained to use any means necessary to bring America back to their God. This never told story shows how Hoover and white evangelicals and Catholics fundamentally transformed American religion and politics.  Not only did this partnership solidify the political norms of white evangelicalism and contribute to the political rise of white Christian nationalism, it also established religion and race as the bedrock of the modern national security state, giving shape to today’s FBI, and setting the terms for today’s domestic terrorism debates.
 
Here is more information on the book and event. Registration for the free in-person and online event are here.
 
MHC

May 19, 2022 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 14, 2022

Call for Proposals for the Fourth Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

 November 4-5, 2022 – Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

Building on the success of the Equality Law Scholars’ Forum held at UC Berkeley Law in 2017, at UC Davis Law in 2018, and at Boston University Law in 2021, and in the spirit of academic engagement and mentoring in the area of Equality Law, we (Tristin Green, University of San Francisco, visiting Loyola Los Angeles AY 2022-23; Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Boston University; and Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis) announce the Fourth Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum to be held in Fall 2022. 

This Scholars’ Forum seeks to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique and to provide scholars at all career stages the opportunity to engage with new scholarly currents and ideas.  We hope to bring together scholars with varied perspectives (e.g., critical race theory, class critical theory, queer theory, feminist legal theory, law and economics, law and society) across fields (e.g., criminal system, education, employment, family, health, immigration, property, tax) and with work relevant to many diverse identities (e.g., age, class, disability, national origin, race, sex, sexuality) to build bridges and to generate new ideas in the area of Equality Law.  

We will select five or six relatively junior scholars (untenured, newly tenured, or prospective professors) in the U.S. to present papers from proposals submitted in response to this Call for Proposals. In so doing, we will select papers that cover a broad range of topics within the area of Equality Law.  Leading senior scholars will provide commentary on each of the featured papers in an intimate and collegial setting.  The Forum will take place all day Friday through lunch on Saturday.  Participants are expected to attend the full Forum.  The Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will pay transportation and accommodation expenses for participants and will host a dinner on Friday evening.  

This year’s Forum will be held on November 4-5, 2022, at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

Junior scholars are invited to submit abstracts of proposed papers, 3-5 pages in length, by June 10, 2022.   

Full drafts of papers must be available for circulation to participants by October 20, 2022

 

Note: We urge submission of proposals for drafts that will still be substantially in progress in October/November 2022 over drafts that will be in late-stage law review edits at that time.

Proposals should be submitted to:

Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis School of Law, lmsaucedo@ucdavis.edu.  Electronic submissions via email are preferred.

May 14, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Proposals for the Fourth Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum

Call for Proposals for the Fourth Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum, November 4-5, 2022 – Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

Building on the success of the Equality Law Scholars’ Forum held at UC Berkeley Law (2017), UC Davis Law (2018), and Boston University Law )2021), and in the spirit of academic engagement and mentoring in the area of Equality Law, we (Tristin Green (University of San Francisco, visiting Loyola Los Angeles 2022/23;) Angela Onwuachi-Willig (Boston University) and Leticia Saucedo (UC Davis)) announce the Fourth Annual Equality Law Scholars’ Forum to be held in Fall 2022.

This Scholars’ Forum seeks to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique and to provide scholars at all career stages the opportunity to engage with new scholarly currents and ideas. We hope to bring together scholars with varied perspectives (e.g., critical race theory, class critical theory, queer theory, feminist legal theory, law and economics, law and society) across fields (e.g., criminal system, education, employment, family, health, immigration, property, tax) and with work relevant to many diverse identities (e.g., age, class, disability, national origin, race, sex, sexuality) to build bridges and to generate new ideas in the area of Equality Law.

We will select five or six relatively junior scholars (untenured, newly tenured, or prospective professors) in the U.S. to present papers from proposals submitted in response to this Call for Proposals. In so doing, we will select papers that cover a broad range of topics within the area of Equality Law. Leading senior scholars will provide commentary on each of the featured papers in an intimate and collegial setting. The Forum will take place all day Friday through lunch on Saturday. Participants are expected to attend the full Forum. The Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will pay transportation and accommodation expenses for participants and will host a dinner on Friday evening.

This year’s Forum will be held on November 4-5, 2022, at Loyola Law School in Los Angeles.

Junior scholars are invited to submit abstracts of proposed papers, 3-5 pages in length, by June 10, 2022.

Full drafts of papers must be available for circulation to participants by October 20, 2022.

We urge submission of proposals for drafts that will still be substantially in progress in October/November 2022 over drafts that will be in late-stage law review edits at that time.

Proposals should be submitted to: Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis School of Law, lmsaucedo@ucdavis.edu. Electronic submissions via email are preferred.

KJ

May 14, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 13, 2022

May 17 Symposium at Rutgers Law School on the New Jersey Immigrant Trust Directive

Rutgers

Interim Dean Rose Cuison-Villazor, Director of the Immigration Law, Policy, and Justice (CILPJ) at Rutgers Law School, invites you to a May 17, 2022, between 12:30 and 2:30 PM (EST) (in person or via Zoom), symposium discussing New Jersey's Immigrant Trust Directive, which then Attorney General Gurbir Grewal issued in November 2018. The Immigrant Trust Directive limits certain voluntary assistance by state and local law enforcement in the enforcement of immigration law. CILPJ analyzed publicly disclosed records from more than 400 law enforcement agencies in New Jersey on their implementation of the Directive. 

Overall, CILPJ affiliates will report that although the Immigrant Trust Directive has helped reduce ICE removals in New Jersey, parts of it have not been fully enforced. Greater and more consistent enforcement of the Immigrant Trust Directive is necessary to achieve its goals. (The report will be circulated on May 17).   

New Jersey Assemblymember Raj Mukherji and immigrants' rights advocates will be participating as well. Lunch (up to 30 people) will be provided before the symposium begins. 

The link to register is here.

KJ

May 13, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

2022 Annual Pre-AILA Crimes & Immigration Seminar

Join the National Immigration Project of National Lawyers Guild's Annual Pre-AILA Crimes & Immigration Seminar on Tuesday and Wednesday June 14-15. I spy immprofs Maureen Sweeney & Linus Chan in the lineup! Full schedule is below. Online (registration fee $150 and up; more info here).

TUESDAY, JUNE 14, 2022


11:45am - 12:00pm: Welcome

12:00pm - 1:30pm: The Categorical Approach and Recent Developments

(90 minutes of instruction/1.50 CLE Credits)

This session will cover how advocates can make the most of the categorical approach methodology in their defense of immigrants with convictions. We will cover key features of the categorical and modified categorical approaches.

Speakers:

  • Nadia Anguiano-Wehde, Asst. Visiting Professor of Clinical Law, University of Minnesota
  • Maureen Sweeney, Law School Professor, University of Maryland Carey School of Law, NIPNLG Board Member 

1:30pm - 2:00pm: Break 

2:00pm- 3:15pm:  Winning Post- Conviction Relief   

(75 minutes of instruction/1.25 CLE Credits)

This session will present a conceptual and procedural framework for obtaining post-conviction (PCR) relief that is effective in immigration proceedings, including the legal standards governing whether PCR orders are effective in the immigration context.

Speakers

  • Norton Tooby, Law Offices of Norton Tooby
  • Matthew Vogel, Senior Staff Attorney, NIPNLG

3:15pm - 3:45pm: Break

3:45pm - 5:00pm: Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude

(75 minutes of instruction/1.25 CLE Credits)

Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude (CIMTs) can be difficult to understand with any precision. And yet, courts routinely find all manner of criminal offenses to be CIMTs, with significant ramifications for clients. This session will examine what CIMTs are, where they’ve come from, and where they’re going to help advocates better prepare for and defend against CIMT allegations.

Speakers

  • Khaled Alrabe, Senior Staff Attorney, NIPNLG
  • Tanika Vigil, Consulting Attorney, NIPNLG

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2022


11:45am - 12:00pm: Welcome

12:00pm - 1:15pm: Pushing Back on Discretionary Denials   

(75 minutes of instruction/1.25 CLE Credits)

Immigration adjudicators regularly deny relief as a matter of discretion for applicants with involvement in the criminal legal system, particularly when such involvement is not serious enough to outright disqualify them for relief. This session will discuss creative strategies to prevent discretionary denials based on criminal legal system involvement as well as ways to address them in the appellate context. 

Speakers

  • Linus Chan, Assoc. Clinical Professor of Law and Vaughan G. Papke Research Scholar, University of Minnesota Law School
  • Norton Tooby, Law Offices of Norton Tooby

1:15pm - 1:45pm: Break

1:45pm - 3:00pm: Strategies to Fight "Reason to Believe" Drug Trafficking   

(75 minutes of instruction/1.25 CLE Credits)

This session will discuss the "reason to believe" drug trafficking ground of inadmissibility as well as as its ramifications and develop strategies for fighting such findings.

Speakers:

  • Karla Ostolaza, Deputy Director, Immigration Practice, The Bronx Defenders
  • Francisco Ugarte, Manager, Immigration Defense Unit, San Francisco Public Defender's Office

3:00pm - 3:30pm: Break

3:30pm - 5:00pm: Recent Developments at the BIA and Circuit Courts  

(90 minutes of instruction/1.50 CLE Credits)

Both the Board of Immigration Appeals and the various federal Circuit Courts of Appeals have recently seen developments at the intersection of criminal law and immigration law. This session will explore some of those developments and their implications.

Speakers:

  • Rebecca Scholtz, Senior Staff Attorney, NIPNLG
  • Ben Winograd, Immigrant & Refugee Appellate Center

May 10, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 9, 2022

Call for Papers: AILA Law Journal, Fall 2022 Edition

The AILA Law Journal has issued a Call for Papers for the Fall 2022 issue.

The submission deadline is June 1, 2022. Guidelines for submissions are available here.

AILA

IE

May 9, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

Regional Expert Paper Series at CeMeCa

A Regional Expert Paper Series is being released with sponsorship from the Center for Mexico and Central America (CeMeCA) at Columbia University. The series features high-quality, cutting-edge empirical research by Central American, Mexican, and U.S.-based investigators and academics and can be used to help with preparation of asylum cases. 

One strand of the initiative includes translations of selected reports, papers, and data from research centers in Central America and Mexico that would not otherwise be available in English. The purpose of the series is to make local knowledge and area studies expertise more broadly accessible. The series is curated by anthropologists Amelia Frank-Vitale (Princeton) and Lauren Heidbrink (CSU-Long Beach). The first paper, Conditions of Children and Youth in Guatemala, authored by investigators Lauren Heidbrink, Sandra Chu Norato, and María García Maldonado, examines the underlying conditions of children’s lives in Guatemala, highlighting the relevant laws, policies, and institutional practices that shape the everyday lives of children and youth and that lead to their migration. Drawing from the authors' experiences in Guatemala as researchers, attorneys, and practitioners, the report details how ‘laws on the books’ may conflict with ‘laws in practice,’ identifying where the Guatemalan government is either unwilling or unable to ensure basic protections and rights for children.

An invitation to area studies researchers to contribute with submission guidelines has also been released: Call for Papers.

Reach out to us at mexican-center@columbia.edu with questions about the series. 

MHC (H/T Lenni Benson)

May 4, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Data and Research | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 3, 2022

Implementing Migration Policy: Excavating the Administrative and Bureaucratic Processes Behind Migrant Admissions and Deportation

A hybrid conference takes place at UC Berkeley this week on May 2-3, 2022. It is titled "Implementing Migration Policy: Excavating the Administrative and Bureaucratic Processes Behind Migrant Admissions and Deportation." Conference organizers include Professor Irene Bloemraad and Dr. Nicholas Fraser. RSVP here

DAY 1 (May 2)

Session 1: Bureaucrats’ role in shaping immigration policy
1:15-3:00 pm

Session 2: Civil society’s engagement in policy implementation
3:15-5:00 pm

A public reception will follow the conclusion of Session 2, at 5:15 pm at the Women's Faculty Club on the UC Berkeley campus.

DAY 2 (May 3)

Session 3: The role of subnational jurisdictions in migrant entry and settlement
1:15-3:00 pm

Session 4: How states reconcile national law with international legal and global normative pressures
3:15-5:00 pm

This conference will be held on the UC Berkeley campus and will be open to the public; registration provides a link for livestreaming of the panels (Q&A will not be livestreamed).  Day 1 was comparative and interdisciplinary in nature.

MHC

May 3, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)