Tuesday, August 11, 2020

AALS Schedule -- Immigration Panels

AALS has circulated a preliminary schedule for the 2021 Annual Conference, which will be virtual this year. Here are some important dates to calendar: 

  • Wednesday January 6, 4:15-5:30 (Eastern): New Voices in Immigration Law
  • Thursday January 7, 1:15-2:30 (Eastern): Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

-KitJ

August 11, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 10, 2020

Saturday Deadline: Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2021 AALS conference, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

August 10, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday Deadline: Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

August 10, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 1, 2020

Changing Technology in Immigration Court: COVID-19 and Beyond, Free Webinar

Webinar

Texas A&M University School of Law is offering a free webinar that will explore the changing role of technology in immigration courts, including the use of remote adjudication, telephonic appearances by counsel, and electronic filing. Additionally, the webinar will examine possible ways that technology can be used to expand access to counsel and help address the backlog of immigration cases. The panelists will discuss the potential benefits and challenges associated with various technologies such as remote adjudication from the perspectives of attorneys representing immigrants, counsel with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, an immigration judge, and academics. The webinar will consider not only how the COVID-19 pandemic spurred technological changes, but also any potential long-term impact of those changes. During this one-hour webinar, attendees will be able to ask questions.

Presenters

  • Daniel Bleiberg, Associate, Jones Day, Laredo Project
  • Robert Dunikoski, Deputy Chief Counsel for Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Dallas, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
  • Ingrid Eagly, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
  • Luz Herrera, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Experiential Education, Texas A&M School of Law
  • The Honorable Hugo Martinez, Assistance Chief Immigration Judge, Fort Worth Immigration Adjudication Center
  • Moderator: Fatma Marouf, Professor of Law and Immigrant Rights Clinic Director, Texas A&M School of Law

IE

August 1, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2021 AALS conference, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 28, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· Online

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, which will take place January 5-9, 2021 online. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

July 28, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 24, 2020

The Impact of the Coronavirus Crisis on Immigrants and Immigration: What to Know and How to Help

Cornell

The Impact of the Coronavirus Crisis on Immigrants and Immigration; What to Know and How to Help, Thursday, July 30, 2020, 3pm EDT

Event Overview

The COVID-19 crisis has impacted the immigration system and the people attempting to navigate it in significant ways. Immigrants already in the U.S. who think they may have the coronavirus are afraid to go to hospitals for testing or treatment, fearing the threat of INS agents. Noncitizens in immigration detention centers are getting sick and dying because of the cramped and unsanitary conditions. Meanwhile, those seeking to enter the U.S. face heightened barriers: The federal government has temporarily suspended new immigrant visas and imposed travel restrictions on travelers from China and other countries. Most State Department embassies are closed, making it impossible for people to get visas or for employers to bring in needed workers.

Join Cornell Law School professors Stephen Yale-Loehr and Jaclyn Kelley-Widmer, along with student attorney Camilah Hamideh, for a discussion on how the immigration system is functioning in the wake of the pandemic, including ways to advocate for those tangled in its red tape.

This event is co-sponsored by the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies and Migrations: A Global Grand Challenge.

PENDING: Attendees may be eligible to receive 1 NY CLE credit in the area of Professional Practice. This program is appropriate for both transitional and non-transitional attorneys.

What You'll Learn

The executive actions on immigration issued by the current administration during the pandemic How COVID-19 is impacting immigration courts and detention centers Visa suspension issues and border closures for international workers, students, and leisure travelers How to engage in immigration advocacy

Speakers

Stephen Yale-Loehr Professor of Immigration Law Practice Cornell Law School Camilah Hamideh Student Attorney, Cornell Law Clinical Programs Cornell Law School Jaclyn Kelley-Widmer Associate Clinical Professor of Law Cornell Law School

Register Now

KJ

July 24, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 23, 2020

The Racial Roots of the Federal Administrative State, by Jonathan Weinberg

Jonathan Weinberg's contribution to the Yale JREG Symposium on Racism and Administrative Law addresses bureaucratic mainfestations of racism over the course of U.S. history. He begins with the Fugitive Slave Act and devotes the bulk of his essay to the Chinese Exclusion Act. His conclusion: "We can see, in other words, the seeds of nearly all of modern administrative law in the administration of Chinese exclusion."

His essay is here; the full list of contributors is listed in a previous immprof blog post here. A running list of immigration scholars still to come: Kit Johnson, Bijal Shah, Shruti Rana [will update as the symposium continues its weekly postings.]

MHC

July 23, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Immigration, Trump, and COVID-19

Today at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) national virtual conference, I had the opportunity to attend a terrific panel titled “Year Four of the Trump Administration: What’s Happened, What’s to Come, and How COVID-19 Has Impacted Immigration Policy in the U.S.” This timely panel covered much ground in collecting and analyzing the huge number of immigration policy changes that have taken place during the COVID-19 pandemic. Royce Bernstein Murray of the American Immigration Council (AIC) moderated the panel and here are some of the interesting highlights from the panelists:

  • Jorge Loweree, Policy Director at AIC, discussed how the administration has pursued sweeping immigration policy changes during the COVID-19 pandemic, at times using the pandemic to justify these changes, such as with Presidential Proclamation 10014 suspending the entry of certain nonimmigrants.
  • Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, Policy Counsel, at AIC focused his remarks on the impact of COVID-19 on U.S. immigration courts, including the widespread health concerns raised by the opening of detained immigration courts during the pandemic.
  • Kathryn Shepherd, National Advocacy Counsel at AIC, called attention to the dangerous conditions inside immigrant detention centers during the pandemic and a recent oversight complaint filed by AIC and other groups that brings to light the challenges that people are facing in ICE detention in the pandemic.

 

IE

July 22, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, July 21, 2020

Stakeholder Town Hall Meeting Hosted by National Association of Immigration Judges (NAIJ)

The National Association of Immigration Judges (NAIJ) is inviting stakeholders to participate in a virtual town hall meeting on Wednesday, July 22nd at 8 p.m. ET to discuss the challenges facing judges, staff, counsel, respondents, and the public during the Executive Office for Immigration Review’s reopening of the immigration courts. Stakeholders can submit questions in advance of the meeting, and can also request an opportunity to speak.

To RSVP for the meeting, fill out this form by Wednesday, July 22nd at 3:00 p.m. ET.

Relevant to NAIJ's recent work is a grievance that NAIJ filed on July 8, 2020 outlining concerns about immigration court operations during COVID-19. 

IE

July 21, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 29, 2020

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 29, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9, 2021· San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

June 29, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Breaking News: Supreme Court Rejects Challenge to Expedited Removal

Index
The Supreme Court today decided Department of Homeland Security v. Thuraissigiam.  Justice Alito, joined by the Chief Justice and Justices Thomas, Gorsuch, and Kavanaugh, as applied to the case at hand, the expedited removal statute does not does not violate the provision of the U.S. Constitution barring suspension of habeas corpus.  Thuraissigiam, who was apprehended about 25 yards from the U.S./Mexico border after entering the United States without inspection, did not seek release from custody, but an additional opportunity to obtain asylum.  The majority therefore held that, because it applies to challenges to detention, the Suspension Clause did not apply to this case and that the 1996 immigration reforms barred judicial review of the Thuraissigiam's asylum claim.  It also rejects the arguments that Thuraissigiam's due process rights had been violated, invoking extreme plenary power cases like Knauff and Mezei, which the U.S. government will likely find useful in the future in seeking to limit the rights of noncitizens seeking admission into the United States.    
 
Justice Thomas concurred to "address the original meaning of the Suspension Clause."
 
Justice Breyer, joined by Justice Ginsburg, concurred in the judgment, emphasizing that, in this case alone, the expedited removal process as applied did not violate the Suspension Clause. 
 
Justice Sotomayor, joined by Justice Kagan, dissented, concluding that the Suspension Clause had been violated by the denial of judicial review.  She wrote:  "Today’s decision handcuffs the Judiciary’s ability to perform its constitutional duty to safeguard individual liberty and dismantles a critical component of the separation of powers."  Justice Sotomayor also rejects the majority's due process analysis since Thuraissigiam was apprehended in the United States.
 
Stay tuned for further analysis.
 
UPDATE (June 26):  Nicole Narea on Vox ("The Supreme Court just allowed Trump’s expansion of deportations to go unchecked") looks critically at the Court's decision.
 
UPDATE (June 27):  Kari Hong offers the opinion analysis of Thuraissigiam  for SCOTUSBlog.
 
UPDATE (July 1):  Jeffrey Chase analyzes the Court's opinion.  His final line:  "Thus, as more asylum seekers are subjected to credible fear determinations under an increasingly uncertain standard, the Supreme Court's opinion has closed the lone avenue for obtaining federal court review of the propriety of a negative determination."
 
UPDATE  (July 2):  More on the decision from Aditi Shah on Lawfare.
 
UPDATE (July 7):  Amanda Tyler looks at the impacts of Thuraissigiam on Lawfare.
 
KJ

June 25, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (1)

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Health and Immigration Detention Amid Covid-19 Webinar TODAY

Cornell University and Physicians for Human Rights will offer a free webinar featuring top notch attorneys litigating immigration detention release cases and public health experts on Thursday, June 4 from 12-2 pm pacific / 3-5 pm eastern. The webinar seeks to distribute timely information about health and immigration detention in the time of the COVID-19 pandemic to families and friends of people in detention (the presentations will be in English). The event will involve two panel discussions and a Q&A featuring medical and public health experts as well as counsel for plaintiffs in a number of significant litigation matters implicating conditions of confinement within and release from immigration detention in the midst of the pandemic across the country. Register here: https://rb.gy/eirete. Full speaker list below:

Panel:  Eunice Cho Senior Staff Attorney American Civil Liberties Union,  National Prison Project
 
Gregory P. Copeland and Sarah T. Gillman Counsel in O.M.G. v. Wolf Rapid Defense Network
 
Neha Desai Counsel in Flores v. Barr  National Center for Youth Law
 
Lisa Graybill and Maia Fleischman Counsel in Fraihat v. ICE Southern Poverty Law Center
 
William Lopez, PhD, MPH Clinical Assistant Professor University of Michigan School of Public Health
 
Ranit Mishori, MD, MHS Senior Medical Advisor Physicians for Human Rights
 
Alan Shapiro, MD Clinical Assistant Professor  Albert Einstein College of Medicine

 

MHC

June 4, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 28, 2020

From the Bookshelves: Hamilton and the Law by Lisa A. Tucker

Hamilton cover
An innovative book collecting essays on legal issues in Hamilton will be released by Cornell University Press (October 2020). Included are chapters on immigration-related issues by Elizabeth Keyes and Anil Kalhan. The full book description is here:

Since its Broadway debut, Hamilton: An American Musical has infused itself into the American experience: who shapes it, who owns it, who can rap it best. Lawyers and legal scholars, recognizing the way the musical speaks to some of our most complicated constitutional issues, have embraced Alexander Hamilton as the trendiest historical face in American civics. Hamilton and the Law offers a revealing look into the legal community's response to the musical, which continues to resonate in a country still deeply divided about the reach of the law.

A star-powered cast of legal minds—from two former US Solicitors General to leading commentators on culture and society—contribute brief and engaging magazine-style articles to this lively book. Intellectual property scholars share their thoughts on Hamilton's inventive use of other sources, while family law scholars explore domestic violence. Critical race experts consider how Hamilton furthers our understanding of the law and race, while authorities on the Second Amendment discuss the language of the Constitution's most contested passage. Legal scholars moonlighting as musicians discuss how the musical lifts history and law out of the dusty archives and onto the public stage. This collection of minds, inspired by the phenomenon of the musical and the Constitutional Convention of 1787, urges us to heed Lin-Manuel Miranda and the Founding Fathers and create something new, daring, and different.

The book will be featured in a LSA 2020 panel on Sunday, May 31 at 2:15 pm ET. Conference registration is required. More details in my prior Immprof post.

MHC

May 28, 2020 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 25, 2020

Law and Society Assocation Annual Meeting - Online Sessions on Citizenship and Migration

LSA Denver 2020 is now LSA Online 2020. There will be 15+ sessions related to immigration and citizenship. The full program book is here and the virtual conference website is here.

A business meeting for CRN2 on Citizenship and Migration will take place 11:15 PT/12:15 MT/1:15 CT/2:15 ET here. Conference registration is not required for this session.

A pre-conference workshop on Wednesday, May 27 will provide a place for WIPs associated with CRN2 Citizenship and Migration. The co-organizers include Shannon Gleeson, Rebecca Hamlin, Lisa Martinez, Edelina Burciaga, and myself. A keynote address will be given by Hiroshi Motomura. Other workshop presenters include Anil Kalhan, Miranda Hallett, David Hasuman & Michael Tan, Sonya Rao, Jill Family, Michael Churgin, Elizabeth Keyes, Shalini Bhargava, Catherine Bowman, Rebecca Hamlin, David Cook-Martin, Blanca Ramirez, Ingrid Eagley, and Shannon Gleeson.  (Pre-registration required.)

The main conference from Thursday, May 28 - Sunday, May 31 includes 15 sessions sponsored by CRN2 Citizenship and Migration, including a new books panel (featuring Beth Caldwell, Deported Americans: Life After Deportation in Mexico; Ming H. Chen, Pursuing Citizenship in the Enforcement Era; Angela Garcia, Legal Passing; Laura Enriquez, Of Love and Papers; Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, Banned: Immigration Enforcement in the Time of Trump) and AMRs for Dimitry Kochenov's Citizenship, Cesar Garcia Hernandez's Migrating to Prison, Shoba Wadhia's Banned: Immigration Enforcement in the Trump Era. (Pre-registration required.)

There is a roundtable session on Challenges to Legal Migration and Citizenship in the Enforcement Era and paper sessions on topics ranging from immigration bureaucracy, to local immigration enforcement, to noncitizen detention, to asylum and refugee law, to accessing immigraiton justice, and to comparative immigration law. Of particular note is a two-part paper session on critical immigration conversations focusing on borders and criminalization. Even more papers concern human rights, globalization, and cross-border migration. (Pre-registration required.)

Award winners related to migration include Jeffrey Kahn, Islands of Sovereignty (Herbert Jacobs Book Prize for the best book in law and society published in 2019), Cesar Garcia Hernandez (honorable mention, John Hope Franklin prize for best article on race, racism, and law), and Nina Vuolajarvi (honorable mention, Law and Society Association article prize).

MHC

May 25, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call for Papers for the Education Law Section at the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting

 The Section on Education Law is pleased to announce (with co-sponsorship from the Immigration Law Section) a Call for Papers from which one or two additional presenters will be selected for the section’s program entitled “The Future of Plyler v. Doe on its 40th Anniversary” in January, 2021 in San Francisco. 
 
Panel Details  The Supreme Court’s consideration of undocumented students’ access to public K-12 education in Plyler v. Doe in 1981 has largely been interpreted broadly to require their admission to public schools and to prevent discrimination against them. With the current administration’s aggressive stance on immigration enforcement, Congress’s failure to pass any kind of amnesty for undocumented students, legal challenges to the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, and a change in the makeup of the Court, the future of Plyler children is unclear.
 
This program, which is co-sponsored by the AALS Section on Immigration Law, will explore the future of undocumented students’ access to public education in light of these and any other related events. What did the Court actually hold in Plyler? To what extent are students who are undocumented currently fully integrated into public schools? Would this Supreme Court uphold or overturn the decision? 
 
Submission Method and Due Date  Please email submissions to Professor Maryam Ahranjani at Maryam.Ahranjani@law.unm.edu by Friday, August 14, 2020. Papers that address the theme of children’s access to education regardless of immigration status and current challenges are welcome. Although there are no requirements for the length of the submission, the review committee will preference completed drafts over abstracts or outlines. The Education Law Section executive committee will review the submissions and select up to two papers to be presented at our section’s program in January. 
 
Questions?  Please direct any inquires to Professor Ahranjani at the e-mail address above. Please note that the author of the paper(s) selected will be responsible for paying all expenses associated with attendance at the AALS meeting. However, remote participation on the panel may be available for those who are unable to travel to the conference in person.

May 25, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law

January 5-9 2021· San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at its principal session during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses

The Session theme is: “Outsourced Borders and Invisible Walls.”

This panel explores the many ways that the U.S. government relies on outsourced borders and invisible walls in its immigration policy. In recent years, the U.S. has outsourced many of its immigration enforcement functions. The federal government has delegated power and responsibility for immigration enforcement to state and local governments, to private actors, and to foreign governments. In its operation of and within detention facilities that are privately owned and maintained, its formal and informal collaboration with Mexican border agents and police, in its reliance on private contractors for building a border wall, and more, the U.S. government extensively leverages other entities and governments in its immigration enforcement efforts.

At the same time, the government has constructed a number of invisible barriers to immigration. In recent years, the White House has leveraged its control of administrative agencies to promote new barriers to immigration. Agencies and actors formally charged with protecting immigrants and workers have been repurposed to bolster immigration enforcement efforts. The resulting barriers block access to opportunities to immigrate legally under existing law and complicate individuals’ efforts to regularize their immigration status.

This panel will assess these outsourced borders and invisible walls, unpack the history behind them, and discuss the impact that these developments have had on democratic accountability and on the rights of migrants and long-term U.S. residents, including citizens.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by September 30, 2020.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) with the subject “AALS Submission.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at an AALS Annual Meeting, and if so, when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Jennifer M. Chacón (chacon at law.ucla.edu) and Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

May 6, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Call For Papers--AALS 2021, New Voices in Immigration Law

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 5-9, 2021 · San Francisco, CA

Submission Deadline: August 15, 2020

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2020 AALS Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, which will take place January 5-9, 2021. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when he have it.

This session will be structured as a series of simultaneous works-in-progress discussions, rather than as a panel. Preselected commentators will lead small-group round-table discussions of papers.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 15, 2020. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2021: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities. If you have participated in previous AALS panels, please indicated when and in what capacity.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

May 6, 2020 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 6, 2020

Invitation to a Virtual Book Launch: Perchance to Dream by Michael A. Olivas

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NYU Press is sponsoring a special virtual book launch with author Michael A. Olivas on Friday, April 10 at 10 MT/12 EST. Here is a link to the details of the book Perchance to Dream and the way to join by ZOOM

Michael A. Olivas introduced by Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, Book Launch for Perchance to Dream: A Legal and Political History of the DREAM Act and DACA
FRIDAY. APRIL 10, 2020 | 10:00 AM MT/ 12pm EST
Attend via Zoom online.

Perchance to DREAM is the first comprehensive history of the DREAM Act, which made its initial congressional appearance in 2001, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the discretionary program established by President Obama in 2012 out of Congressional failure to enact comprehensive immigration reform. Michael A. Olivas relates the history of the DREAM Act and DACA over the course of two decades.

Michael A. Olivas is William B. Bates Distinguished Chair in Law at the University of Houston Law Center and Director of the Institute for Higher Education Law and Governance at UH. 

Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia is the Samuel Weiss Faculty Scholar and Founding Director of the Center for Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at Penn State Law in University Park, Pennsylvania.

KJ

April 6, 2020 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)