Tuesday, September 27, 2022

Conferrence (UC Davis): Lessons Learned and Ways Forward for the Economics and Politics of Refugee Integration

Conference

Location:  King Hall (UC Davis School of Law)

Symposium: "Lessons learned and ways forward for the economics and politics of refugee integration"

October 14, 2022, School of Law, UC Davis

To attend, please register here by October 5th

Jointly sponsored by

  • Economic Assimilation Research Network (Innovation Fund Denmark),
  • UC Davis Global Migration Center
  • UC Davis Aoki Center for Critical Race and Nation Studies

Academic Organizers: Prof. Raquel Aldana, Prof. Mette Foged, Prof. Giovanni Peri.

This workshop brings together the research of world-renowned scholars from economics, politics and law to understand the complex issues related to the integration, policies and politics relative to refugees in the world.

  • In the morning session, economists will present the results of evaluations of policies on the economic success of refugees and their children and a panel will discuss what we have learned from recent research and policy experience;
  • In the afternoon session, in a comparative approach that considers refugees in the US, at the US-Mexico Border and other refugees crisis in Latin America political scientists and law scholars will analyze aspects related to different legal and political responses of receiving countries to refugees inflow.
  • Click here for the conference agenda.

KJ

September 27, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 23, 2022

St. John’s Law Review Symposium: 40th Anniversary of the Plyler v. Doe and Immigration Law in the United States

St. John’s Law Review Symposium:  40th Anniversary of the Plyler v. Doe and Immigration Law in the United States
The St. John’s Law Review invites you to attend a virtual symposium marking the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s historical Plyler v. Doe decision. Join a diverse group of legal scholars and practitioners as they discuss the history of Plyler, the rights of undocumented children seeking entry into the United States, ongoing challenges plaguing the U.S. immigration system, and possible solutions to those problems.
The symposium proceedings are dedicated to the late Professor Michael A. Olivas, whose immigration law scholarship and contributions as a change agent in the field endure for the benefit of us all.
 
DateFriday, November 4, 2022
 
Time11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
 
LocationThe symposium will livestream on Zoom.
 
ProgramKeynote SpeakerRachel Moran, Distinguished and Chancellor’s Professor of Law, University of California Irvine School of Law
 
Dedication to Professor Michael A. OlivasLeonard M. Baynes, Dean, The University of Houston Law Center
 
Panel I: Plyler v. Doe and the Rights of Undocumented Children in the United States
Moderator:Rosemary C. Salomone, Kenneth Wang Professor of Law, St. John's University School of Law
 
Panelists:
Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Penn State Law
Martin Guggenheim, Fiorello LaGuardia Professor of Clinical Law Emeritus, New York University School of Law
Sejal Singh, Assistant Professor in the Division of Legal Studies, St. John’s University
Nicholas Espíritu, Supervising Attorney, National Immigration Law Center
 
Panel II: Ongoing Challenges Plaguing the U.S. Immigration System and Possible Solutions
Moderator:Sheldon A. Evans, Professor of Law, St. John's University School of Law
 
Panelists:
Jenny-Brooke Condon, Professor, Seton Hall Law School
Lori Nessel, Professor, Seton Hall Law School
Austin Kocher, Research Assistant Professor, Syracuse University
Maximiliano Gabriel Gluzman, Fellow, Belmont University School of Law
Vanessa H. Merton, Professor, Pace University School of Law
 
Register to AttendThere is no fee to attend the symposium, but registration is required.Please register online
 
KJ

September 23, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, September 22, 2022

Immigration @ AALS 2023: New Times, New Names

Registration is now open for the AALS annual conference. This year, it will be IN PERSON, if you can believe that, and in sunny San Diego, CA no less.

Your executive committee for the AALS section on immigration has worked up three panels for you:

  • Wednesday, January 4, 2023: 3-4:40PM. New Voices in Immigration Law. This session will feature six WIPs. You'll soon get an email from me asking you to please come to this session and serve as a reader for one set of three WIPs. We've got an interesting balance of paper topics this year.
    •    GROUP ONE:
      • Nermeen Arastu and Qudsiya Naqui, Standing on Our Own Two Feet: Disability Justice as a Frame for Achieving Abolition and Dismantling Our Ableist Immigration System. Principal commentator: Daniel Morales
      • Jocelyn B. Cazares, Legalized Removals of Noncitizens Deemed to Have [In]Credible or [Un]Reasonable Fears: The Role of Discretion in the Review Process of Fear Determinations. Principal commentator: Jaya Ramji-Nogales
      • Richard H. Frankel, Restoring “Civil”ity in Immigration Proceedings. Principal commentator: Lenni Benson.
    •   GROUP TWO
      • Eunice Lee, Immigration in the Shadow of Death. Principal commentator: Angela Banks
      • Talia Peleg, The Dangers of ICE's Unrestrained Rearrest Power. Principal commentator: Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia
      • Carrie Rosenbaum, Arbitrary Arbitrariness Review. Principal commentator: Jayanth K. Krishnan
  • Thursday, January 5, 2023: 8-9:30AM. Racism in Immigration Regulation. Our panelists are David Cook-Martín (University of Colorado, Boulder, Sociology), Kevin Johnson (UC Davis School of Law), Emily Ryo (USC Gould School of Law), and Claire Thomas (New York Law School). Karla McKanders (Vanderbilt Law School) will be the moderator. Do you need more than names? A little preview? Well, okay. If you insist.
    • Emily and Claire will be talking about their current projects that examine specific instances and effects of racism in immigration: Emily’s paper provides empirical evidence of racism in immigration enforcement proceeding results, and Claire’s focuses on the use of the concept of statelessness as a vehicle for racial discrimination.
    • Kevin will bring his career-long exploration of racism in immigration law, including recent work on the political climate that resulted in the Chinese Exclusion Act, to the table.
    • David is a professor of sociology and author of Culling the Masses: The Democratic Origins of Racist Immigration Policy in the Americas—he will add a non-law perspective to the discussion.
    • Karla is currently working on a project that explores the role of racism in narratives about immigration law’s origins, which perfectly sets her up to weave the panel topics together.
  • Thursday, January 5, 2023: 10-11:40AM. Leveraging Service Opportunities to Maximize Student Learning in Immigration Law. This panel will feature discussion amongst immprofs Kif Augustine-Adams, Lenni Benson, Richard Boswell, and Violeta Chapin, moderated by David Thronson.

We are excited about these programs and hope to see you all there.

-KitJ

September 22, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, September 21, 2022

Webinar: Unpacking Immigration Cases Before the Supreme Court

 


Unpacking Immigration Cases Before the Supreme Court

Thursday, September 221:00 pm - 2:00 pm ET/10:00 am - 11:00 am PT 

The Supreme Court has had a busy year, with several of its decisions affecting immigration. What are the implications of the court's decisions—and what comes next?

Join the American Immigration Council for a discussion with Professor Ahilan Arulanantham from the Center for Immigration Law and Policy at the UCLA School of Law on recent and upcoming Supreme Court decisions and how they impact immigration policy and law. 

During the webinar, we will discuss:  

  • An overview of significant Supreme Court immigration cases from the 2021 - 2022 term. 
  • How non-immigration cases could impact immigrants and their advocates. 
  • A preview of the immigration cases before the court in the 2022 - 2023 term.

​​​​​We hope you'll join us for this important discussion. Space is limited—register today

KJ

September 21, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, September 11, 2022

Register for UT Harney Lecture on Colorblind Nationalism and Limits of Citizenship

Wednesday, September 7, 2022

Immigration @ AALS 2023

Registration is now open for the AALS annual conference. This year, it will be IN PERSON, if you can believe that, and in sunny San Diego, CA no less.

Your executive committee for the AALS section on immigration has worked up three panels for you:

    • Wednesday, January 4, 2023: 8-9:30AM. Leveraging Service Opportunities to Maximize Student Learning in Immigration Law. This panel will feature discussion amongst immprofs Kif Augustine-Adams, Lenni Benson, Richard Boswell, and Violeta Chapin, moderated by David Thronson.
    • Wednesday, January 4, 2023: 3-4:40PM. New Voices in Immigration Law. Selected papers to be announced soon. Also -- I'll be hitting you up soon to be a reader who can offer feedback at this session.
    • Thursday, January 5, 2023: 8-9:30AM. Racism in Immigration Regulation. Panelists to be announced soon.

We are excited about these programs and hope to see you all there.

-KitJ

September 7, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 2, 2022

UC Hastings Law SF Center on Race, Immigration, Citizenship, and Equality

LogoPreJan

Professor Ming Hsu Chen — an expert on race, immigration, and citizenship – has launched a new center at UC Hastings this fall that will pursue groundbreaking research on equality issues and collaborate with other scholars and academic institutions.

Chen, who previously founded the Immigration and Citizenship Law Program at the University of Colorado, was a visiting professor before joining the UC Hastings permanent faculty this year.

The Center on Race, Immigration, Citizenship, and Equality (RICE) will offer lectures, conferences, panel discussions, research projects, student employment opportunities, and law classes with fieldwork components. It will promote scholarly engagement and forge links between other centers at UC Hastings, including the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies (CGRS) and the Center for Racial and Economic Justice (CREJ).

Chen said she wants people to understand intersections between concepts of race, immigration, and citizenship as they pertain to equality. She said one way to do this is to apply the lenses of different fields of study. To that end, the RICE Center will host a half-day conference on Nov. 18 on “belonging” featuring experts from UCLA, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, and Stanford University. “It’s a chance for leaders of research institutes that do related work to share resources and ideas about how universities approach these issues at an institutional level,” said Chen.

Additional goals include getting students involved in interdisciplinary research. Chen said as part of her seminar this fall on Citizenship and Equality, law students will interview immigrants and do fieldwork, including helping people fill out applications for citizenship. “It’s a way to make sure that what students are learning is connected to the real world,” she said.

She has plans for a spring colloquium on Race, Citizenship and Equality that will include legal scholars, practicing lawyers, and immigration advocates, open to the Hastings community. Enrolled students will delve deeper into papers with a closed session following the public lectures, she said, “It’s a way to have these experts in dialogue with our students and our faculty and to share that with the world outside of the law school.”

Finally, Chen said she is considering commissioning original research on high-skilled workers and Documented Dreamers, a group of some 200,000 children of long-term visa holders who come to the U.S. lawfully but face deportation if they can’t obtain independent legal status by age 18. “It is the type of understudied issue that is important in San Francisco, the hub of technology, and has implications nationwide,” she said.

Chen added that law students and research assistants could interview migrant parents and students about their experiences and the problems they would face being returned to a country they haven’t lived in for many years and where they may be unfamiliar with the language and culture – much like undocumented DREAMers. The findings would then be published and shared with policymakers and advocacy groups.

For more information about the RICE Center and its upcoming events, click here.

September 2, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Data and Research | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 26, 2022

Speaker series on Race, Security, and Empire

Thursday, August 25, 2022

Call For Papers: St. John's L. Rev. Symposium on Plyler v. Doe

St. John's Law Review Symposium:

40th Anniversary of Plyler v. Doe and Immigration Law in the United States

November 4, 2022

About the Symposium

On Friday, November 4, 2022, the St. John’s Law Review is hosting a symposium marking the 40th anniversary of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision in Plyler v. Doe and honoring the late Professor Michael A. Olivas, a leading authority and prolific scholar on U.S. immigration law. Symposium participants will examine the rights of undocumented children in their historical and current contexts. They will also explore broader legal and policy issues impacting asylum seekers and refugees in the United States, including those fleeing the crisis in Ukraine.

Program Overview

The symposium, which will broadcast on Zoom from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., will feature a morning and an afternoon panel. As a highlight of the day, Rachel Moran, Distinguished and Chancellor’s Professor of Law at UCI Law, will deliver the symposium’s keynote address.

Call for Papers

You’re invited to submit unpublished scholarly papers addressing the above immigration law and policy topics. We’ll select symposium panelists from submissions accepted for publication in the Spring 2023 issue of the St. John’s Law Review.

Submission Guidelines

Please email your paper proposal (500–750 words), a brief bio, and your contact information as a Word attachment to kpugliese.stjohnslrev@gmail.com by Friday, September 2, 2022. If we accept your paper for publication, we’ll need the full draft (1000–7000 words) by Friday, October 14, 2022.

-KitJ

August 25, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 23, 2022

Bridging the Legal-Scientific Divide in the Treatment of Trauma in Immigration--An In-Person/Virtual Conference

Bridging the Divide Conference Program 9-23-22_kml_bl

A fascinating conference coming up next month -- Bridging the Legal-Scientific Divide in the Treatment of Trauma in Immigration. This looks like a continuation of the work discussed in April 2021 at U.C. Davis (for those who might find it ringing bells). The conference program is here. Note that folks can attend in person (should you be hanging about Ithaca in September) or online. Online folks can sign up for access with this link.

-KitJ

August 23, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 17, 2022

Conversation with USCIS Director Ur Jaddou and UCLA ILP Director Ahilan Arulnantham

Please join UCLA Center for Immigration Law and Policy’s Ahilan Arulanantham for a conversation with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Director Ur M. Jaddou, UCLA Law ‘01, on Monday, August 29, at 3:30 p.m. Pacific Time. This conversation will take place before a live audience and broadcast simultaneously via Zoom from UCLA’s Herb Alpert School of Music’s Lani Hall.

A component of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, USCIS administers lawful immigration to the United States and adjudicates benefits and services that include, but are not limited to, permanent residence, naturalization and U.S. citizenship, asylum and refugee status, Temporary Protected Status, deferred action (including DACA), and employment authorization.

To join on Zoom, register here: https://bit.ly/3dowof4.

 

August 17, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 16, 2022

19TH ANNUAL IMMIGRATION LAW AND POLICY CONFERENCE

19TH ANNUAL IMMIGRATION LAW AND POLICY CONFERENCE, September 20, 2022, HYBRID (virtual & in-person).

Register here.

This year's Immigration Law and Policy Conference organized by the Migration Policy Institute, Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc., and the Georgetown University Law Center, will be a hybrid event on September 20, transmitted online for virtual audiences and open to a select number of in-person attendees in Washington, DC.

THE PANELS:

An Unsettled Landscape: The State of Play for Immigration in an Era of Growing Executive Action and State Involvement

The Court Is Now in Session: The Growing Role of Litigation to Shape Legal and Policy Developments

Reshaping the Asylum System at the U.S.-Mexico Border

A Glass Half Full or Half Empty: Humanitarian Protection Developments

KJ

August 16, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, August 12, 2022

Coming soon to the bookshelves: Oxford Handbook of Comparative Immigration Law

Oxford handbk

The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Immigration Law is a book-length treatment of comparative immigration law. The project will bring together some of the world’s leading immigration and comparative legal scholars to identify and analyze the key issues of comparative immigration law, further define the field, and catalyze further research. The handbook will provide scholars, students, and practitioners with a broader set of ways to think about immigration law and policy.

According to the Table of Contents, the volume will commence with a section on theoretical and conceptual frameworks for studying immigration comparatively, including viewing immigration as economics, law enforcement, foreign relations, racial control, and administrative law. The cross-cutting issues in inclusion include visa policies, refugee laws, family and employer-sponsored immigration, alienage, and integration. Exclusionary policies such as border security, deportation processes, detention, and statelessness are also included. Within each section, comparisons are made across a sweeping set of countries in the United States, to the UK and European Countries (France, Germany), to Israel and the Middle East, to China and East Asia, to Latin America, and to subsaharan Africa among others.  Authors hail from universities just as global in reach. 

The collection, edited by Kevin Cope (University of Virginia), Stella Burch Elias (University of Iowa), and Jill Goldenziel (Marine Corps University), is a collaborative project. Contributors, who include ImmigrationProf Blog editors KJ, KitJ, MHC, and AK, will be workshopping their chapters this weekend at the University of Virginia Law School and preparing for publication in 2023. 

MHC

August 12, 2022 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 10, 2022

*New: Aug 19 deadline* Call For Papers--AALS 2023, New Voices in Immigration Law

There has been a modest extension of the deadline to this call for papers. Submissions now due Friday, August 19, 2022.

CALL FOR PAPERS
“New Voices in Immigration Law”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
Wednesday, January 4 – Saturday, January 7, 2023 (session timing TBD) · San Diego, CA

Submission Deadline: August 19, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers and works in progress for its “New Voices in Immigration Law” session at the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting which will take place in San Diego, CA January 4-7, 2023. This session has not yet been scheduled. We will send updated information when we have it.

This session will be structured as a works-in-progress discussion, rather than as a panel. Selected papers will be discussed in turn, with time for author comments, thoughts from a lead reader, and group discussion.

Submissions may address any aspect of immigration and citizenship law. We also welcome papers that explore these topics from alternative disciplines or perspectives.

Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own annual meeting registration fee.

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 19, 2022. Feel free to submit an abstract, a précis, or a work-in-progress. Priority will be given to individuals who have never presented an immigration law paper at the AALS Annual Meeting, works not yet published or submitted for publication, and junior scholars.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to profkitjohnson at gmail.com (Subject: AALS 2023: New Voices in Immigration Law). In your email, please indicate how you meet our selection priorities.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Kit Johnson (profkitjohnson at gmail.com).

-KitJ

August 10, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

*New: Aug 19 deadline* Call For Papers--AALS 2023, Racism in Immigration Regulation

There has been a modest extension of the deadline to this call for papers. Submissions now due Friday, August 19, 2022.

CALL FOR PAPERS
“Racism in Immigration Regulation”
Association of American Law Schools · Section on Immigration Law
January 4, 2023 – January 7, 2023 (session yet to be scheduled)
San Diego, California

Submission Deadline: August 19, 2022

The Section on Immigration Law of the Association of American Law Schools invites papers for presentation at a session during the 2023 AALS Annual Meeting in San Diego, California, which will take place January 4-7, 2023. The session day and time will be added to this post when available. Please note that individuals presenting at the program are responsible for their own Annual Meeting registration fee and travel expenses.

The AALS conference theme is “How Law Schools Can Make a Difference,” and the session theme is “Racism in Immigration Regulation.”

Scholars are engaging in long overdue and important conversations about racial justice in the United States. U.S. law and institutions, many have recognized, harbor systemic biases that result in profound racial inequalities. U.S. immigration law and policy are no exception. From the era of Chinese Exclusion to modern distinctions in the treatment of Central American, African, Haitian, and Ukrainian asylum seekers, race has proved to be an important factor in migrants’ access to and experience immigrating to the United States. This historical trajectory raises questions that can inform broader conversations about systemic racism: How should we approach a legal regime with explicitly racist foundations? How does the expressly exclusionary function of immigration regulation affect its application to different groups? What role does the discretion inherent in enforcement of immigration law play in its effect?

Submission Guidelines: The deadline for submissions is August 19, 2022. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. Priority also will be given to individuals who have not recently presented a paper at the AALS Annual Meeting. Decisions will be made by mid-September 2022.

Please email submissions in Microsoft Word format to nunezc@law.byu.edu with the subject “AALS Submission- Racism in Immigration Regulation.” In your email, please indicate whether you have previously presented your work at a AALS Annual Meeting, and, if so, when.

Inquiries: Please direct any questions or inquiries to Carolina Núñez (nunezc@law.byu.edu).

-KitJ

August 10, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

The State of Global Displacement and Refugee Advocacy: A Conversation with UN High Commissioner Filippo Grandi and Friends

 

The State of Global Displacement and Refugee Advocacy: A Conversation with UN High Commissioner Filippo Grandi and Friends

This year, the world marked a grim milestone: more than 100 million people worldwide have been forced to leave their homes due to conflict, violence, and other crises. What must advocates for the rights of displaced people do from here?

Eric P. Schwartz, in his final public event as president of Refugees International after five distinguished years of service, will host a wide-ranging conversation with UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi and Asylum Access CEO Sana Mustafa on the state of global displacement and resettlement, challenges and opportunities ahead, and the importance of refugee leadership in advocating for solutions to the world’s displacement crises. An audience Q&A will follow.

Wednesday, August 10
11:00 am to 12:00 pm ET

 
 

        Moderator

Eric Schwartz, President, Refugees International 

        Panelists

Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, UNHCR

Sana Mustafa, CEO, Asylum Access  

Cover Photo Caption: Ukrainian refugees are seen disembarked from a train that arrived from Ukraine to Przemysl train station in Poland. Photo by Attila Husejnow/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.

Unsubscribe | Donate

© 2022 Refugees International, all rights reserved.
1800 M St NW, Suite 405N
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202.828.0110 | Fax: 202.828.0819
www.refugeesinternational.org

         

KJ

August 9, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Event: UVA -- 33rd Sokol Colloquium on International Law: Comparative Immigration Law

Event: UVA -- 33rd Sokol Colloquium on International Law: Comparative Immigration Law

The Sokol Colloquium will convene more than 50 experts on immigration and comparative legal scholarship from around the world to discuss “The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Immigration Law.” The colloquium, featuring in-person and online events, includes authors of the forthcoming book, which is edited by UVA Law professor Kevin Cope, University of Iowa law professor Stella Burch and Marine Corps University professor Jill Goldenziel, who also moderate several panels.  Click the link above for details.

Thursday, Aug. 1, 9 a.m. PST

Links to Attend Online

KJ

August 9, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, August 8, 2022

Online Event: Civic Participation and California Immigrants

In this free virtual program, we discuss the state of civic power for immigrants and DACA status holders in California – electoral and beyond – from California’s founding to current day. Join a panel of scholars and immigration experts to learn more about today’s policy landscape in California, its historical framework, and to consider what role California’s immigrant communities might play in the future of citizenship.

California is home to 183,000 DACA recipients and nearly 1 in 4 Californians is foreign born. What civic powers do DACA status holders have in California? How is voter access offered at the local, state and federal levels? On its tenth anniversary, what is the legacy of this landmark program?  Join us on Zoom on August 11 at 4pm for Civic Participation and California Immigrants. To register, use the link below.

Thursday, August 11

 4:00-5:00 pm PST

Register for the Online Event

Panel:  

Cynthia Buiza, Executive Director, California Immigrant Policy Center

Hiroshi Motomura, Professor, UCLA Law

Moderator: 

Sonja Diaz, Founding Executive Director, UCLA Latino Policy & Politics Institute

KJ

August 8, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

AALS New Books Seesion on Race and Constitutional Law [Webinar]

AALS Con Law bks

AALS Constitutional Law section will host a new books session featuring four fantastic authors - Dorothy Roberts, Kristin Hennings, Sheryll Cashin, and Derecka Purnell - on Wednesday August 17 at 4pm EST. Speaker bios and other details appear here

Register here:
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIpceigrDorHdRlpR5yVgukb6pcyHwbhEJc

MHC (h/t Andrea Freeman)

August 8, 2022 in Books, Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, August 6, 2022

Engaging Law School Students in Public Service for Citizenship Preparation

Under Executive Order 14012, Restoring Faith in Our Legal Immigration Systems and Strengthening Integration and Inclusion Efforts for New Americans, and guided by the principles of the Interagency Strategy for Promoting Naturalization, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has been leading efforts since February 2021 to support and partner with educational institutions, businesses, and the nonprofit sector to address the needs of the more than 9.1 million lawful permanent residents (LPRs) who may be eligible to apply for naturalization based on their time in LPR status.

Heading into the 2022-2023 academic year, USCIS is seeking support from law schools for two initiatives to help applicants overcome obstacles to U.S. citizenship, which include limited pro bono or low-cost legal assistance providers in many communities.  Because integration is a whole of society effort, we are seeking your support to help aspiring eligible lawful permanent residents to apply successfully for naturalization.  Specifically, we would like law schools around the country to agree to one or both of the following initiatives:

  • Recognizing naturalization application support to satisfy law school public service requirements:  Many law schools require a set number of public service hours for graduation. Permitting law students to count naturalization application assistance as a part of their public service requirement would be an inspiring option for students and, given the straightforward nature of many naturalization applications, could also potentially draw in 1L students while meeting an important community need.
  • Creating naturalization-focused “days of service” around key calendar dates, e.g., Constitution Day (September 17) and MLK Day (January 16): Many law students want to gain practical legal experience but are often not able to participate in semester or year-long legal clinics. Providing opportunities for students to join time limited legal clinics (one-two day or week-long events, held multiple times a year) permits students to develop legal skills while offering much needed (and often overlooked) support for applicants. While it might seem logical to center this work in immigration law clinics, they are most often focused on complicated benefits and issues (e.g., relief from removal in immigration court and administration areas such as asylum, T and U visas, and VAWA self-petitions). Naturalization application focused “days of service” have high impact potential and minimal cost to law schools, firms, and associated attorneys and students.

A briefing and training will be held on August 10, 2pm EST. More information on how to register for the online session can be obtained from Kelly Ryan, Senior Advisor, Office of the Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. 

 

MHC

August 6, 2022 in Conferences and Call for Papers | Permalink | Comments (0)