Monday, July 26, 2021

From the Bookshelves: The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee

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The Downstairs Girl by Stacey Lee (March 2021) (young adult historical fiction) (New York Times Bestseller)

Publisher's abstract

From the critically acclaimed author of Luck of the TitanicUnder a Painted Sky, and Outrun the Moon comes a powerful novel about identity, betrayal, and the meaning of family.

By day, seventeen-year-old Jo Kuan works as a lady's maid for the cruel daughter of one of the wealthiest men in Atlanta. But by night, Jo moonlights as the pseudonymous author of a newspaper advice column for the genteel Southern lady, "Dear Miss Sweetie." When her column becomes wildly popular, she uses the power of the pen to address some of society's ills, but she's not prepared for the backlash that follows when her column challenges fixed ideas about race and gender. While her opponents clamor to uncover the secret identity of Miss Sweetie, a mysterious letter sets Jo off on a search for her own past and the parents who abandoned her as a baby. But when her efforts put her in the crosshairs of Atlanta's most notorious criminal, Jo must decide whether she, a girl used to living in the shadows, is ready to step into the light. With prose that is witty, insightful, and at times heartbreaking, Stacey Lee masterfully crafts an extraordinary social drama set in the New South.

Caitlyn Paxson on NPR has this to say about the Downstairs Girl:

"I honestly didn't know it was possible for a work of historical fiction to seriously take on the racism and sexism of the 19th century South while still being such a joyful read. I almost want to dare readers to not be delighted by its newspaper office shenanigans, clandestine assignations in cemeteries, and bicycle-riding adventures, but there's honestly no point. The Downstairs Girl, for all its serious and timely content, is a jolly good time."

The author, Stacey Lee, was one of my star civil procedure students at UC Davis School of Law!

KJ

July 26, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, July 17, 2021

From the Bookshelves: The Racial Muslim: When Racism Quashes Religious Freedom by Sahar F. Aziz

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The Racial Muslim: When Racism Quashes Religious Freedom by Sahar F. Aziz

The University of California Press describes the book as follows:

"

Why does a country with religious liberty enmeshed in its legal and social structures produce such overt prejudice and discrimination against Muslims? Sahar Aziz’s groundbreaking book demonstrates how race and religion intersect to create what she calls the Racial Muslim. Comparing discrimination against immigrant Muslims with the prejudicial treatment of Jews, Catholics, Mormons, and African American Muslims during the twentieth century, Aziz explores the gap between America’s aspiration for and fulfillment of religious freedom. With America’s demographics rapidly changing from a majority white Protestant nation to a multiracial, multireligious society, this book is an in dispensable read for understanding how our past continues to shape our present—to the detriment of our nation’s future."

KJ

July 17, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 16, 2021

New Book: Challenges for the Future of Access to Justice

A new book available here examines challenges to access to justice in the international context. Here is a description of the project:

This project raises one of the most prevalent problems facing the internationalization of access to justice in the continent today: the challenge of facilitating an international debate without the dominance of the English language. Although there exists a diverse global community of scholars dedicated to this subject, people dealing with access to justice in everyday life are primarily local and, when attempting to meet the needs of vulnerable persons in their community, their methods are usually framed by local legal approaches and contexts, being mainly dependent on national languages. Promoting a continental conversation thus proves challenging.

Several chapters touch on themes of interest to the ImmigrationProf community. Chapter six by Fedora Mathieu examines "Persecution Grounds as a Restricting Tool of the Right to Asylum in Canada: The Example of Haitian Women Who Fear Gendered Violence." Chapter seven by Gloria Song and Melisa Handi is titled "Beyond Cookie Cutter Templates to Women’s Lived Experiences: Domestic Violence-based Refugee Claims from Guyana."

IE

 

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July 16, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 7, 2021

From the Bookshelves: The Politics of Patronage Lawyers, Philanthropy, and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund by Benjamin Márquez

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The Politics of Patronage Lawyers, Philanthropy, and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund by Benjamin Márquez (University of Texas Press, July 2021)

The first book about the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the influential work it has done for the Latina/o community, and the issues stemming from its dependence on large philanthropic organizations.

KJ

July 7, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 4, 2021

From the Bookshelves: End of the Myth

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Reposting a book recommendation for July 4th: End of the Myth: From the Frontier to the Border by Greg Grandin (originally posted on Immigrationprof Blog in May 2020). Provides a sobering on the establishment of America and the sacrifices wrought.

MHC

 

July 4, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Immigration Doesn't Just Mean Coming To America. These 4 Books Are Good Reminders.

Rachel Martin for NPR offers recommendations on four immigration books.   The recommendations come from Vietnamese American author Ocean Vuong, whose novel On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous explores colonial history and his own personal experiences to tell a coming-of-age story.  On the eve of July 4, he recommended some books that highlight the immigrant experience, in America and around the world. 

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Slow Lightning by Eduardo C. Corral

"This book particularly is haunted by the immigrant experience on the border. Corral comes from parents who are Mexican immigrants. And there's a sensibility of, what is an American body that comes through migration and great loss? This book is filled with mourning and grief."

 

LAST WORDS

Last Words from Montmartre by Qiu Miaojin

"'I am truly inspired by Qiu Miaojin. She's a Taiwanese immigrant to Paris — and we often don't think of the immigrant having, or the immigrant story having a sex life, a love life, a life of depression and deep existential angst. And Miaojin really positions in immigrant narrative in an existential wonder."

 

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The Enigma of Arrival by V.S. Naipaul

"The Enigma of Arrival, named after painting by [Giorgio de] Chirico, is exactly that. It's that the two words here, `enigma' and `arrival,' never leave Naipaul as a writer. The estrangement of being in a new world and yet forever arriving, never truly having arrived. The immigrant process is one that is ongoing and filled with wonder, curiosity and a sense of loneliness."

 

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The Lover by Marguerite Duras

'One of my goals was to kind of de-center America as the site of immigration — and we realise that immigration is a species-wide legacy. Everyone who has been human from time immemorial has had to make the decision about how to move and escape and make new routes. Duras' The Lover is a perennial classic for me in this theme and others because this is a very unique situation of a failed colonial project.'

kj

July 4, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 2, 2021

From The Bookshelves: The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez

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It's the first weekend of July. Are you still looking for a summer read? Consider The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez.

A boy and a girl who fall in love. Two families whose hopes collide with destiny. An extraordinary novel that offers a resonant new definition of what it means to be American.

Arturo and Alma Rivera have lived their whole lives in Mexico. One day, their beautiful fifteen-year-old daughter, Maribel, sustains a terrible injury, one that casts doubt on whether she’ll ever be the same. And so, leaving all they have behind, the Riveras come to America with a single dream: that in this country of great opportunity and resources, Maribel can get better.

When Mayor Toro, whose family is from Panama, sees Maribel in a Dollar Tree store, it is love at first sight. It’s also the beginning of a friendship between the Rivera and Toro families, whose web of guilt and love and responsibility is at this novel’s core.

Woven into their stories are the testimonials of men and women who have come to the United States from all over Latin America. Their journeys and their voices will inspire you, surprise you, and break your heart.

Suspenseful, wry and immediate, rich in spirit and humanity, The Book of Unknown Americans is a work of rare force and originality.

-KitJ

July 2, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, July 1, 2021

From the Bookshelves: Immigration Matters: Movements, Visions, and Strategies for a Progressive Future (2021).  Editors, Ruth Milkman, Deepak Bhargava, Penny Lewis

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Immigration Matters: Movements, Visions, and Strategies for a Progressive Future (2021).  Editors, Ruth Milkman, Deepak Bhargava, Penny Lewis 

Abstract

During the past decade, right-wing nativists have stoked popular hostility to the nation’s foreign-born population, forcing the immigrant rights movement into a defensive posture. In the Trump years, preoccupied with crisis upon crisis, advocates had few opportunities to consider questions of long-term policy or future strategy. Now is the time for a reset.

Immigration Matters offers a new, actionable vision for immigration policy. It brings together key movement leaders and academics to share cutting-edge approaches to the urgent issues facing the immigrant community, along with fresh solutions to vexing questions of so-called “future flows” that have bedeviled policy makers for decades. The book also explores the contributions of immigrants to the nation’s identity, its economy, and progressive movements for social change. Immigration Matters delves into a variety of topics including new ways to frame immigration issues, fresh thinking on key aspects of policy, challenges of integration, workers’ rights, family reunification, legalization, paths to citizenship, and humane enforcement.

The perfect handbook for immigration activists, scholars, policy makers, and anyone who cares about one of the most contentious issues of our age, Immigration Matters makes accessible an immigration policy that both remediates the harm done to immigrant workers and communities under Trump and advances a bold new vision for the future.

KJ

July 1, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 24, 2021

From the Bookshelves: Questions for Ada by Ijeoma Umebinyuo

Questions for Ada is a book of poetry by Nigerian author Ijeoma Umebinyuo. One of the included poems is Diaspora Blues. It is a short work--just 16 words--but wildly compelling:

so, here you are
too foreign for home
too foreign for here.
never enough for both.

-KitJ

June 24, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

Casebook Supplement for Immigration and Nationality Law (Updated June 24)

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From Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, casebook co-editor:

Forthcoming is a 2021 summer supplement for the case book: Immigration and Nationality Law. If you are interested in adapting the casebook or obtaining a supplement to the 2nd edition, please e-mail the editors and check out the Carolina Academic Press website

MHC (on behalf of the casebook editors)

June 23, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 17, 2021

From The Bookshelves: Immigration, Crime, and the Administration of Justice

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Immigration, Crime, and the Administration of Justice: Contemporary Readings is a newly released book edited by Drs. Heather Alaniz, Fei Luo, and Doshie Piper.

As the publisher describes it, the book:

provides students with a concise, scholarly overview of contemporary immigration issues related to policy, policing, and corrections. The carefully selected readings in this volume provide students with insight into the lived experiences of immigrants in America. The anthology is divided into three distinct units that address issues surrounding how immigration is viewed through the lens of criminal justice statistics, policy, and crime. Unit 1 consists of three empirical studies that explore the perceptions and realities of the relationship between crime and immigration. In Unit 2, readings outline both macro- and micro-level immigration policies and how they intersect with criminal justice. The final section addresses the future of immigration and crime, including readings that explore immigration and civil rights, the politics of belonging, and the future of U.S. immigration policy. Introductions and post-reading questions encourage critical thought and greater engagement with the material. Immigration, Crime, and the Administration of Justice is an ideal supplementary resource for undergraduate and graduate-level courses in criminal justice and administration of justice with focus on immigration.

Note that Unit 3 contains a contribution from our very own immprof blogger extraordinaire Kevin R. Johnson: The Future of Immigration and Civil Rights in the United States (a chapter from his 2004 book The Huddled Masses Myth: Immigration And Civil Rights).

-KitJ

June 17, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (1)

Friday, June 11, 2021

From The Bookshelves: The Book of Rosy by Rosayra Pablo Cruz & Julie Schwietert Collazo

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Need a summer read? Try The Book of Rosy: A Mother's Story of Separation at the Border by Rosayra Pablo Cruz & Julie Schwietert Collazo. Here's the publisher's pitch:

Compelling and urgently important, The Book of Rosy is the unforgettable story of one brave mother and her fight to save her family.

When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly. But she had no choice: violence—from gangs, from crime, from spiraling chaos—was making daily life hell. Rosy knew her family’s one chance at survival was to flee Guatemala and go north.

After a brutal journey that left them dehydrated, exhausted, and nearly starved, Rosy and her two little boys arrived at the Arizona border. Almost immediately they were seized and forcibly separated by government officials under the Department of Homeland Security’s new “zero tolerance” policy. To her horror Rosy discovered that her flight to safety had only just begun.

In The Book of Rosy, with an unprecedented level of sharp detail and soulful intimacy, Rosy tells her story, aided by Julie Schwietert Collazo, founder of Immigrant Families Together, the grassroots organization that reunites mothers and children. She reveals the cruelty of the detention facilities, the excruciating pain of feeling her children ripped from her arms, the abiding faith that staved off despair—and the enduring friendship with Julie, which helped her navigate the darkness and the bottomless Orwellian bureaucracy.

A gripping account of the human cost of inhumane policies, The Book of Rosy is also a paean to the unbreakable will of people united by true love, a sense of justice, and hope for a better future.

-KitJ

June 11, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 10, 2021

Book Review of Adam Cox and Cristina Rodriguez's book, The President and Immigration (2020)

In Making Immigration Law in the Harvard Law Review (2021), HiroshiMotomra reviews Adam Cox and Cristina Rodriguez's book, The President and Immigration (2020).  Here is the abstract:

"In this book review, Professor Motomura begins by noting that, by building a bridge between immigration law and U.S. administrative and public law more generally, Professors Cox and Rodríguez make a major contribution in both fields, particularly through their “nuanced and persuasive” historical account of the rise of presidential power over immigration, as well as their analysis of the current relationship between Congress and the President as “co-principals” in making immigration law. However, Professor Motomura also argues that by viewing presidential immigration power as a symptom of a “structural problem” in domestic enforcement, Cox and Rodríguez do not engage fully with the international aspects of the migration-related challenges that Presidents are likely to face in the coming years and decades. As Professor Motomura puts it, events and trends outside U.S. borders — war, civil unrest, and climate change, to mention just a few — are likely in the future to influence migration to the United States even more than they do today. Professor Motomura therefore analyzes how and why the future of presidential immigration power will most likely return to its international origins more than Cox and Rodríguez acknowledge."

KJ

June 10, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Guest Post Jude Joffe-Block on Driving While Brown

DRIVING WHILE BROWN: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance is a new book from UC Press that fellow Arizona journalist, Terry Greene Sterling and I co-authored. It draws from our years on the ground in Maricopa County covering Arpaio’s unprecedented local immigration crackdown, and the grassroots, Latino-led coalition that organized to stop him, sued him for racial profiling and helped turn Arizona blue in 2020.

We have two upcoming book events that we hope you will consider joining. 

Today June 10 1:00pm PT/4:00pm ET. Live interview with The Zeitgeist’s Jane Roper. Interview will be streamed on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/amightyblaze/ and YouTube bit.ly/AMBYT.

Monday June 14 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET. Berkeley Public Library Discussion with Monica Campbell, senior reporter and editor for The World, focused on immigration. Register https://bit.ly/2SlxBJM

Key to the book is the Melendres v. Arpaio (now Melendres v. Penzone) class action racial profiling lawsuit Latino motorists brought against the sheriff with the help of attorneys from the American Civil Liberties Union, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and Covington & Burling. Plaintiffs alleged Arpaio’s zealous crackdown on undocumented immigrants had led deputies to unconstitutionally target and detain Latino drivers and passengers in traffic stops. A federal judge agreed. The case took surprising twists and turns. Eventually, Arpaio was found in criminal contempt of court for disobeying court orders in the case, but was spared a criminal sentence when he received former President Donald J. Trump’s first pardon.

As a reporter covering this story, along with Arizona’s wave of state immigration laws and ensuing litigation, I’ve been a longtime reader of ImmigrationProf Blog to follow immigration news, court rulings and policy changes. I also want to mention that Kevin Johnson’s 2009 Georgetown Law Review article, “How Racial Profiling in America Became the 'Law of the Land': United States v. Brignoni-Ponce and Whren v. United States and the Need for Rebellious Lawyering,” was particularly helpful for my understanding of some of the relevant case law cited in the Melendres case.

I hope fellow blog readers will find our book of interest. We look forward to your feedback!

KJ

June 10, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 7, 2021

Virtual Book Event (June 14): Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance

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Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance  (University of California Press, 2021) chronicles former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio's unprecedented local immigration crackdown and the Latino-led backlash that organized to stop him, sued him for racial profiling, and helped change the political landscape of Arizona --which turned blue in 2020.  Check out an excerpt of the book here.

The authors, Jude Joffe-Block and Terry Greene Sterling, are holding a virtual, free public event at the Berkeley Public Library in Berkeley, California.  The virtual event is Monday June 14 4 p.m. PST.  Register here.

KJ

June 7, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 24, 2021

From The Bookshelves: The Beekeeper of Aleppo by Christy Lefteri

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The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a novel by Christy Lefteri. In 2020, it won the Aspen Words Literary Prize. Here is the publisher's pitch:

Nuri is a beekeeper and Afra, his wife, is an artist. Mornings, Nuri rises early to hear the call to prayer before driving to his hives in the countryside. On weekends, Afra sells her colorful landscape paintings at the open-air market. They live a simple life, rich in family and friends, in the hills of the beautiful Syrian city of Aleppo—until the unthinkable happens. When all they love is destroyed by war, Nuri knows they have no choice except to leave their home. But escaping Syria will be no easy task: Afra has lost her sight, leaving Nuri to navigate her grief as well as a perilous journey through Turkey and Greece toward an uncertain future in Britain.

Nuri is sustained only by the knowledge that waiting for them is his cousin Mustafa, who has started an apiary in Yorkshire and is teaching fellow refugees beekeeping. As Nuri and Afra travel through a broken world, they must confront not only the pain of their own unspeakable loss but dangers that would overwhelm even the bravest souls. Above all, they must make the difficult journey back to each other, a path once so familiar yet rendered foreign by the heartache of displacement.

Moving, intimate, and beautifully written, The Beekeeper of Aleppo is a book for our times: a novel that at once reminds us that the most peaceful and ordinary lives can be utterly upended in unimaginable ways and brings a journey in faraway lands close to home, never to be forgotten.

The author, Christy Lefteri, is not herself Syrian, though she spent time volunteering at a refugee center in Athens prior to writing her book. Lefteri is Cyprian. Her parents, like her protagonists, fled war to resettle in the United Kingdom. And, as NPR reports, Lefteri "grew up in the shadow of trauma." And that history clearly plays a part in her authorship of this award-winning novel.

-KitJ

May 24, 2021 in Books | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 23, 2021

From the Bookshelves: The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin (available June 1)

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The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu by Tom Lin (available June 1)

Here is the description from Amazon.com:

"Orphaned young, Ming Tsu, the son of Chinese immigrants, is raised by the notorious leader of a California crime syndicate, who trains him to be his deadly enforcer. But when Ming falls in love with Ada, the daughter of a powerful railroad magnate, and the two elope, he seizes the opportunity to escape to a different life. Soon after, in a violent raid, the tycoon’s henchmen kidnap Ada and conscript Ming into service for the Central Pacific Railroad.
 
Battered, heartbroken, and yet defiant, Ming partners with a blind clairvoyant known only as the prophet. Together the two set out to rescue his wife and to exact revenge on the men who destroyed Ming, aided by a troupe of magic-show performers, some with supernatural powers, whom they meet on the journey. Ming blazes his way across the West, settling old scores with a single-minded devotion that culminates in an explosive and unexpected finale.

Written with the violent ardor of Cormac McCarthy and the otherworldly inventiveness of Ted Chiang, The Thousand Crimes of Ming Tsu is at once a thriller, a romance, and a story of one man’s quest for redemption in the face of a distinctly American brutality."

KJ

May 23, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, May 22, 2021

From the Bookshelves: Sooley: A Novel by John Grisham

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Summer is here and it is time for some fun reading.  One of my guilty pleasures is murder mysteries and John Grisham is one of the best writers in this genre.  His latest book takes us from a court of law to the basketball court.  But the book has an immigration angle. 

Sooley: A Novel by John Grisham was released late last month.  Here is the publisher's description of the book:

"In the summer of his seventeenth year, Sam­uel Sooleymon gets the chance of a lifetime: a trip to the United States with his South Sudanese teammates to play in a showcase basket­ball tournament. He has never been away from home, nor has he ever been on an airplane. The opportunity to be scouted by dozens of college coaches is a dream come true.

Samuel is an amazing athlete, with speed, quick­ness, and an astonishing vertical leap. The rest of his game, though, needs work, and the American coaches are less than impressed.

During the tournament, Samuel receives dev­astating news from home: A civil war is raging across South Sudan, and rebel troops have ran­sacked his village. His father is dead, his sister is missing, and his mother and two younger brothers are in a refugee camp.

Samuel desperately wants to go home, but it’s just not possible. Partly out of sympathy, the coach of North Carolina Central offers him a scholar­ship. Samuel moves to Durham, enrolls in classes, joins the team, and prepares to sit out his freshman season. There is plenty of more mature talent and he isn’t immediately needed.

But Samuel has something no other player has: a fierce determination to succeed so he can bring his family to America. He works tirelessly on his game, shooting baskets every morning at dawn by himself in the gym, and soon he’s dominating everyone in practice. With the Central team los­ing and suffering injury after injury, Sooley, as he is nicknamed, is called off the bench. And the legend begins.

But how far can Sooley take his team? And will success allow him to save his family?

Gripping and moving, Sooley showcases John Grisham’s unparalleled storytelling powers in a whole new light. This is Grisham at the top of his game."

KJ

May 22, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

From the Bookshelves: The Racial Muslim:  When Racism Quashes Religious Freedom by Sahar F. Aziz

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The Racial Muslim:  When Racism Quashes Religious Freedom by Sahar F. Aziz (Author) (forthcoming  August 2021)

Here is the University of California Press description of the book:

"Why does a country with religious liberty enmeshed in its legal and social structures produce such overt prejudice and discrimination against Muslims? Sahar Aziz’s groundbreaking book demonstrates how race and religion intersect to create what she calls The Racial Muslim. Comparing discrimination against immigrant Muslims with that of Jews, Catholics, Mormons, and African American Muslims during the twentieth century, Aziz explores the gap between America’s aspiration for and fulfillment of religious freedom. With America’s demographics rapidly changing from a majority white Protestant nation to a multiracial, multi-religious society, this book is an essential read for understanding how our past continues to shape our present—to the detriment of our nation’s future."

KJ

May 11, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 10, 2021

Excerpt of Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance by Terry Greene Sterling and Jude Joffe-Block

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We previously blogged pre-publication about a new book, Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance (and here) by Terry Greene Sterling and Jude Joffe-Block.  The book was published by the University of California Press in April 2021.

The UC Press website describes the book in part:  "Journalists Terry Greene Sterling and Jude Joffe-Block spent years chronicling the human consequences of Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s relentless immigration enforcement in Maricopa County, Arizona. In Driving While Brown, they tell the tale of two opposing movements that redefined Arizona’s political landscape—the restrictionist cause embraced by Arpaio and the Latino-led resistance that rose up against it."

Author Spotlight: Q&A with Terry Greene Sterling and Jude Joffe-Block, authors of Driving While Brown.

Here is an excerpt from the book.  Reviews can be found here., here, and here (Kirkus).

KJ

May 10, 2021 in Books, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)