Thursday, June 23, 2022

"Documented Dreamers": The children of employment-based visa holders often have to scramble to find ways to legally remain in the country they call home

Teresa Mathew in the New Yorker offers stories focusing on the dependents of H1-B visa holders showing that "[t]he children of employment-based visa holders often have to scramble to find ways to legally remain in the country they call home." Mathew writes:

"the children of employment-based visa holders often have to scramble to find ways to legally remain in the country they call home. And, even with a visa, they are locked out of many of the advantages granted to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. Because of visa strictures, some children are from families in which only one parent is allowed to work. Once in college, they are usually ineligible for either in-state tuition or federal financial aid, and required to pay the fees of an international student. David Bier, an associate director of immigration studies at the Cato Institute, estimates that there are more than a quarter of a million young adults who are caught in [this] tangled visa web . . . . Many of these young adults call themselves Documented Dreamers or Visa Dreamers, and see a clear connection between their situation and that of Dreamers: the term often used to describe undocumented minors seeking legal residency in the U.S. "

KJ 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2022/06/documented-dreamers-the-children-of-employment-based-visa-holders-often-have-to-scramble-to-find-way.html

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