Thursday, November 19, 2020

DHS Inspector General report: "Because of these IT deficiencies, we could not confirm the total number of families DHS separated during the Zero Tolerance period."

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The down defunct family separation policy has created much human damage.  And more than 500 families still have not been reunited.   A report from the Department of Homeland Security’s Inspector General Joseph Cuffari has found that "outdated IT systems not properly integrated between departments" hampered the agency’s efforts to track migrant families detained and separated at the border, David Uberti reports for The Wall Street Journal. "Because of these IT deficiencies, we could not confirm the total number of families DHS separated during the Zero Tolerance period," Cuffari wrote. "Without the ability to track and share data on family separations and reunifications, CBP adopted various ad hoc methods to work around system limitations, but these methods led to widespread errors." Such methods, he noted, cost "roughly 28,000 man-hours from Border Patrol agents and $1.2 million in overtime pay."

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2020/11/dhs-inspector-general-report-because-of-these-it-deficiencies-we-could-not-confirm-the-total-number-.html

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