Tuesday, October 29, 2019

New Data and Report on "Remain in Mexico"

Wong

 

From Tom Wong, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Director, U.S. Immigration Policy Center (USIPC), University of California, San Diego:

"We released new data today based on over 600 interviews with asylum seekers who have been returned to Mexico under the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), also known as the `Remain in Mexico' policy. Two key findings stand out:

  • Safeguards against refoulement are not being implemented under MPP and asylum seekers are being returned to Mexico despite telling U.S. immigration officials that their persecutor(s) can find and have access to them in Mexico
  • The data show that previous reporting on the harrowing circumstances asylum seekers experience in Mexico do, in fact, amount to systematic trends
  • See data points below

My twitter thread with a link to the report is here: https://twitter.com/TomWongPhD/status/1189265383301230594. Any help amplifying would be greatly appreciated.

We also released a policy brief on MPP, written by Krista Kshatriya and S. Deborah Kang. The policy brief can be found here

Top lines

Process

  • Nearly 9 out of every 10 of our respondents (89.5%) who were asked by U.S. immigration officials about fear of being returned to Mexico responded by expressing fear of being returned to Mexico
  • Of these individuals, 40.4% were given a secondary interview by an asylum officer and 59.6% were not. In other words, U.S. immigration officials further investigated the fears of approximately 4 out of every 10 who expressed fear about being returned to Mexico.
  • However, approximately 6 out of every 10 were placed into the Remain in Mexico policy without any further investigation into the fears that they expressed about being returned to Mexico
  • Of those who were asked by U.S. immigration officials about fear of being returned to Mexico, responded by expressing fear of being returned to Mexico, and were then given a secondary interview by an asylum officer, 63.9% reported that their persecutor(s) can find and have access to them in Mexico but were returned to Mexico anyway
  • Of those who were not asked by U.S. immigration officials about fear of being returned to Mexico, but nevertheless expressed a fear of being returned to Mexico, just 3.9% were given a secondary interview by an asylum officer to further investigate these fears and 96.1% were not

Experiences in Mexico

  • Approximately 1 out of every 4 of our respondents (23.1%) have been threatened with physical violence while in Mexico as they await their immigration court dates
  • Just over 1 out of every 5 of our respondents (21.9%) who are seeking asylum with children under the age of 18 have been threatened with physical violence while in Mexico
  • Altogether, 56.5% of our respondents who have been threatened with physical violence reported that these threats turned into actual experiences of physical violence, including being beaten, robbed, and extorted
  • The length of time spent waiting in Mexico is statistically significantly related to being threatened with physical violence. Approximately 1 out of every 3 of our respondents will likely be threatened with physical violence while in Mexico before they make it to their immigration court dates
  • Just over 1 out of every 3 of our respondents (34.5%) have experienced homelessness while in Mexico as they await their immigration court dates
  • Approximately 1 out of every 3 of our respondents (31.9%) who are seeking asylum with children under the age of 18 have experienced homelessness while in Mexico
  • The length of time spent waiting in Mexico is statistically significantly related to experiencing homelessness. Over 4 out of every 10 of our respondents will likely experience homelessness while in Mexico before they make it to their immigration court dates

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2019/10/new-data-and-report-on-remain-in-mexico.html

Current Affairs | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment