Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Deportees Will Risk Harsh Penalties to Return to Families in the U.S.

Center on poverty

Erin R. Hamilton in a Center for Poverty Research report (Deportees Will Risk Harsh Penalties to Return to Families in the U.S.)  examine how having family in the U.S. affects the intent to return among migrants deported to El Salvador. It finds that being separated from their families in the U.S. is the most important factor in the intent to return, even despite the severe penalties if caught. 

In the two-year period between July 2010 and September 2012, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security deported 204,810 parents of U.S.-citizen children, who made up one-fourth of all removals.] In 2013, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency deported 72,000 parents of children who are U.S. citizens.

Key Facts

•    In 2013, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency deported 72,000 parents of children who are U.S. citizens. These parents make up one-fourth of all deportees.

•    Deportees with children in the U.S. have spent, on average, six years longer in the U.S., are more likely to be employed and more likely to speak English.

•    Salvadoran deportees with both a spouse and children in the U.S., and those whose children are U.S. citizens, are especially likely to intend to return despite severe penalties that can include from two to 20 years in prison and losing the chance to qualifying for legal immigration status

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2015/02/deportees-will-risk-harsh-penalties-to-return-to-families-in-the-us.html

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