Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Join the ILRC Fight Against S-Comm

From the Immigrant Legal Resource Center:

March
Dear Friend:

Earlier this year, Los Angeles resident Isaura Garcia made a 9-1-1 call that changed her life…and did not result in the help she desperately sought to protect herself from violence.  Instead, as a result of her call, Isaura was arrested, spent a week in jail, and was placed in deportation proceedings!  Isaura, a victim of domestic violence, called for help and was instead arrested on mistaken charges of committing felony domestic violence.  Although the charges were dropped, under the federal government’s Secure Communities program, Isaura’s fingerprints were passed along to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and checked against civil immigration databases.
 
Secure Communities(S-Comm) is designed to identify immigrants in the U.S. criminal justice system, who may be deportable under federal immigration law.  However, it is now also being used to reveal non-criminal violations such as undocumented status, resulting in notification to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).  ICE is then taking individuals, such as Isaura, into custody and placing them in deportation proceedings.
 
Thankfully, after community partners in Los Angeles held a press conference to publicize Isaura’s case, ICE ended the deportation proceedings against her.  Coming forward to tell her story, Isaura says: “Secure Communities turned my life upside down.  My 9-1-1 call for help resulted in the worst possible punishment I could have suffered.”
 
The ILRC has been opposed to S-Comm since the program began in 2008 and has participated in national, state, and local efforts to prevent or rescind implementation of S-Comm and limit local enforcement of federal immigration laws.

Now, more than ever, the ILRC needs your continued support.  Please consider a tax deductible gift to support the ILRC in the fight against ICE enforcement efforts like S-Comm.  Your support will ensure that our important work opposing S-Comm continues.   Click here to make your donation today.
 
At the national level, the ILRC has provided technical assistance and participated in a national campaign against S-Comm.  We engaged in administrative advocacy with ICE against the program and worked with Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren and the Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security to put pressure on ICE.  We also helped produce the authoritative report, alongside other national immigration rights organizations, entitled “Restoring Community: A National Community Advisory Report on ICE’s Failed Secure Communities Program.”
 
At the state level, the ILRC helped establish a network of advocates to combat the program, organized a “teach-in” with over 120 advocates, and created an S-Comm “toolkit” for advocates.  We also have been engaged in strategies focused on educating the Attorney General, the California Department of Justice, and state lawmakers.  Locally, we have supported advocacy and coalition building efforts to garner opposition to the program from local officials.  We have been instrumental in establishing anti-S-Comm organizing efforts in at least seven counties and providing assistance in several other counties.

Our work in partnership with other key organizations has resulted in three California sheriffs and many police chiefs opposing S-Comm, and the passage of resolutions opposing the program in the counties of Alameda, San Francisco, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz, and the cities of Richmond, Oakland, East Palo Alto, and Los Angeles.  In San Francisco, our work centered on supporting the sheriff in his efforts to opt-out of S-Comm.  Based on our collaboration in Santa Clara,  the County Counsel’s office issued a public memo which laid out the county’s options regarding S-Comm participation; this was the first known public document to state that, under federal law, immigration enforcement by local authorities is not mandatory, but voluntary, and therefore localities can limit their cooperation with ICE.
 
The ILRC will continue working with immigrant communities and immigrant rights advocates to pressure the federal government to protect the civil rights of all members of our community, including those of immigrants.  We hope you will join us in our fight, and provide support with a tax-deductible contribution that reaffirms your commitment to fairness in immigration laws, justice in immigration enforcement policies, and to safeguard the basic human rights of all of this nation’s people.
 
Thank you again for your continued support. 
 
Sincerely,

Lisa Spiegel
Chair, Board of Directors

Eric Cohen
Executive Director
                           
P.S. – Don’t forget that our Monthly Giving Club option provides you with an easy way to multiply the impact of your gift.  To join the Monthly Giving Club you can pledge a monthly gift by completing and returning the enclosed envelope.  We will take care of the rest.  Any total pledge of $500 or more automatically includes you in our Circle of Friends’ special events, updates and recognition.  Click here  to make your donation today. It is fast, easy, and saves a stamp.

bh

November 30, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

David Duke Arrested In Germany, Ex-Klan Leader Faces Deportation

New Report: Men of Color: Ensuring the Academic Success of Latino Males in Higher Education

Men of Color: Ensuring the Academic Success of Latino Males in Higher Education

Executive Summary: The U.S. Census data are clear: In the coming years, America’s Latina/o community will continue to drive population and labor force growth. Therefore, federal and state policymakers, higher education leaders, and communities small and large across the pre-K to college continuum would be wise to seize this sizeable demographic shift to help propel the United States into a position of economic and social prosperity. Yet, as advocates have articulated, improving the proportion of Latinas/os that access and complete college armed with the knowledge and skills to compete in the 21st century will require much work. The pressing reality is that men of color, and Latino males in particular, lag significantly behind their female peers in terms of both college access and degree attainment. This situation weakens the nation’s ability to utilize its great human capital and ensure the success of its diverse families and communities. This brief seeks to elevate the grave statistics and realities of the growing gender gap in educational attainment among Latinas/os and provides recommendations for education practitioners, institutional leaders, and federal and state policymakers on how to support Latino males on the road to and through college and into the workforce. A first step in ensuring the success of Latino males is to provide information and strategies for stakeholders at the federal, state, regional, and local levels to both embrace and implement a comprehensive agenda that spans early childhood through college. This agenda should emphasize family and community engagement; college and career-ready curricula; linked academic and social supports; and affordability, transparency, and financial literacy. To that end, the authors provide (1) a review of recent census and educational attainment data and related transition points in early childhood, secondary, and postsecondary education for Latinas/os; (2) a promising blueprint to help develop and implement education programs and initiatives to increase the success of Latino male students; and (3) policy and programmatic implications for stakeholders seeking to enact change at the pre-college and college levels and within national, state, and local contexts. Such a comprehensive approach must prioritize the needs of Latino males and value their cultural contexts. Missing this opportunity to provide economic and social advancement for this community will have a profound impact on the future of U.S. citizens and the nation’s economy Executive Summary: The U.S. Census data are clear: In the coming years, America’s Latina/o community will continue to drive population and labor force growth. Therefore, federal and state policymakers, higher education leaders, and communities small and large across the pre-K to college continuum would be wise to seize this sizeable demographic shift to help propel the United States into a position of economic and social prosperity. Yet, as advocates have articulated, improving the proportion of Latinas/os that access and complete college armed with the knowledge and skills to compete in the 21st century will require much work. The pressing reality is that men of color, and Latino males in particular, lag significantly behind their female peers in terms of both college access and degree attainment. This situation weakens the nation’s ability to utilize its great human capital and ensure the success of its diverse families and communities. This brief seeks to elevate the grave statistics and realities of the growing gender gap in educational attainment among Latinas/os and provides recommendations for education practitioners, institutional leaders, and federal and state policymakers on how to support Latino males on the road to and through college and into the workforce. A first step in ensuring the success of Latino males is to provide information and strategies for stakeholders at the federal, state, regional, and local levels to both embrace and implement a comprehensive agenda that spans early childhood through college. This agenda should emphasize family and community engagement; college and career-ready curricula; linked academic and social supports; and affordability, transparency, and financial literacy. To that end, the authors provide (1) a review of recent census and educational attainment data and related transition points in early childhood, secondary, and postsecondary education for Latinas/os; (2) a promising blueprint to help develop and implement education programs and initiatives to increase the success of Latino male students; and (3) policy and programmatic implications for stakeholders seeking to enact change at the pre-college and college levels and within national, state, and local contexts. Such a comprehensive approach must prioritize the needs of Latino males and value their cultural contexts. Missing this opportunity to provide economic and social advancement for this community will have a profound impact on the future of U.S. citizens and the nation’s economy.

KJ 

November 30, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Secure Communities Hearing Today

From the Immigration Policy Center:

The Secure Communities Program: Unanswered Questions and Continuing Concerns

Washington D.C. - Today, the House Immigration Subcommittee will hold a hearing on the controversial Secure Communities program.  In advance of the hearing, IPC has updated The Secure Communities Program: Unanswered Questions and Continuing Concerns, which provides expert analysis of the Secure Communities program and recommendations for its improvement.

Initiated in 2008, Secure Communities is a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) program designed to identify immigrants in U.S. jails who are deportable under immigration law.  ICE plans to implement Secure Communities in every state and local jail across the country by 2013. However, there are a wide range of ongoing concerns with the program that have not been answered to date. This paper describes the Secure Communities program, identifies concerns about the program’s design and implementation, and makes recommendations for the future of the program.

To view this special report in its entirety, visit:

The Secure Communities Program: Unanswered Questions and Continuing Concerns (IPC Special Report, updated November, 2011)

bh

November 30, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Want Jobs? Encourage Immigration

Amy Wilkinson of Harvard's Kennedy School writes on CNN:

If we want to create jobs in America, we must welcome foreign-born innovators. "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses of immigrant entrepreneurs yearning to breathe free": This is the message we need Lady Liberty to shine forth into the world.

Yet Ellis Island has put up a velvet rope line. To vital job generators, we are saying, "There's no room for you."

Inviting immigrants in to create jobs may seem counterintuitive, but the facts are clear. Immigrant-led innovation is key to creating U.S. jobs. According to statistics from Partnership for a New American Economy, 40% of Fortune 500 companies were created by immigrants or their children. Further, between 1995 and 2005, 25% of high-tech startups in the United States had at least one immigrant founder, and these companies have created more than 450,000 jobs. Read more...

bh

November 30, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Immigration Article of the Day: "The Challenges of Family Law and Policy in Immigration Regulation"

"The Challenges of Family Law and Policy in Immigration Regulation" LYNNE MARIE KOHM, Regent University - School of Law.

ABSTRACT:

Stable nations and societies are largely based on stable family law and policy. Questions of family preservation and stability in immigration policy present new dimensions of legal intervention. Offering a review of the relevant literature, this paper presents the challenges in the family law and policy discussion. It considers challenges to United States policies, particularly regarding marriage definitions, Mexican migration, and the challenge of family preservation and restoration. This research further examines global concerns, namely national stability and the need for family restoration in light of diminishing fertility rates, and multiculturalism. Finally, it offers policy principles for developing national immigration regulation, particularly toward building national stability through strong families. A comprehensive approach to family law and immigration policy is necessary, and possible. Providing principles for the formulation of strong family policy promoting national stability in the face of global mobilization of families is the key to building strong and stable future nations.

KJ

November 30, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

U.S. to extend border fence 300 feet into Pacific

Boom-landing-page

The $4.3-million project between Tijuana and Imperial Beach aims to seal off space that opens when the waters recede at low tide. A steel fence 18 feet tall will replace a gap-riddled barrier.  The Obama administration's idea of a modern "make work" project to stimulate the economy?

For more details, read here.

KJ

November 29, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

U.S. Has Alabama Immigration Law in Its Sights

Perez_photo2
Alabama's controversial immigration law continues to draw the attention of the U.S. government.  The Justice Department has challenged the constitutionality of Alabama's immigration law, with an appeal of a district court order upholding most of the law pending in the Eleventh Circuit.

A delegation of DOJ attorneys visted Alabama.

"The more we hear, the more we are concerned about the impact of Alabama’s immigration law on a wide range of federal rights,” said Tom Perez, who heads the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division as an assistant attorney general, at a press conference in Birmingham, Ala.   The quote comes from an article by Tim Mak on POLITICO.COM.

According to POLITICO.COM,

"Perez told reporters that he has heard reports of children dropping out of school due to fears related to the immigration law; that some employers may be using the law as an excuse not to pay workers; and that some people may have been racially profiled after the passage of the immigration statutes. Hundreds of people have made calls to a Justice Department hotline set up to receive complaints about discrimination in the wake of Alabama’s H.B. 56 immigration law, the assistant attorney general noted."

This is not the DOJ's first expression of concerns over the civil rights impact sof Alabama's immigrration law.  In addition to the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the law, a few weeks back, Perez had requested information from Alabama school districts about changes in enrollment after passage of the law.  Click here for further analysis of that data request.

KJ

November 29, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Offshoring Immigrant Investors

Timothy Lee on ARS TECHNICA has an interesting story about "business immigrant incubators."  Some of the Silicon Valley's most important companies, including Intel, Google, and Yahoo, were founded by immigrants. The U.S. immigration system makes it difficult for talented young people born outside of the United States to come here.

"There have been various proposals to make it easier for immigrant entrepreneurs to come to the United States, but they've made no progress in Congress. So a new company called Blueseed is seeking to bypass the political process and solve the problem directly. Blueseed plans to buy a ship and turn it into a floating incubator anchored in international waters off the coast of California."

KJ

November 29, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

More U.S. Students Studying Abroad

International Education Week
By Allan E. Goodman

The Open Doors 2011 Report on International Educational Exchange found that international student enrollment at American colleges and universities has been growing steadily for the past five years, reaching a record high of 723,277 in 2010. The largest increase came from China, with Chinese student numbers rising by 23%—the fourth consecutive year of double-digit increases. International students contribute more than $21 billion to the US economy. There are now 32% more international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities than there were a decade ago.
  The number of US students studying abroad has also grown, increasing by 88% in the past decade. The number continues to rise, with 270,604 American students studying abroad in the 2009–10 academic year, up 4% from the previous year.
  It is positive news that our higher education institutions continue to excel in attracting students from all over the world, and in preparing American students to succeed in an increasingly global environment. The international skills that students gain are crucial to their ability to succeed in global careers and work together across borders to address important world issues.
  It is important that we as educators work to try to ensure that all students have the opportunity to study abroad. We are grateful to the donors and sponsors who support scholarships that make it possible for more students to study outside of their own countries.

bh

November 29, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Monday, November 28, 2011

Immigrant Rights Cookbook Sale

From NNIRR

Cyber Monday starts now!
* * Sale price effective until 9 am PST on Tuesday, Nov. 29 * *
Give twice this holiday season…with NNIRR’s new cookbook –
Recipes on the Move:
Sustaining the Movement for Immigrant Rights
Celebrating our migrant communities and favorite recipes from around the world.
Proceeds from every book sold will benefit NNIRR’s program and activities all year round!
“Clearly, food has become one of the primary entrées of our social interaction. From these exchanges we have gotten to know more about one another: where we come from, our family and broader communities, some of the specific characters from our lives, and the origins of our values for social justice that often stem from these histories… And within the immigrant rights movement, we’ve learned how food from different cultures has introduced diverse communities to one another, building familiarity and bonds…”
Featuring 27 recipes and stories about how food helps to bridge communities and break down walls of intolerance. The delicious recipes in this 70-page collection were contributed by migrant groups representing over 18 nationalities, living in 21 cities across the US and around the globe.

This will be a wonderful present for friends and family - and yourself! Buy now for the holidays!
Cyber Monday special -- $20.00! (regularly $25.00)
SALE PRICE APPLIES ONLY TO ONLINE ORDERS PLACED BEFORE 9 AM PST ON TUESDAY, NOV. 29.
Click here to view Table of Contents of Recipes on the Move.
Click here for mail in form.

bh

November 28, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Occupy San Francisco March for Immigrant Rights Photos by David Bacon

Participants in Occupy San Francisco live in tents in an encampment in Justin Herman Plaza. The camp protests the exploitation of 99% of the population by the wealthiest 1%, as well as police repression and removal of occupy encampments around the country, including the original New York City demonstration, Occupy Wall Street. Camp residents, together with supporters in immigrant rights organizations and unions, marched up Market Street. Marchers carried signs and banners declaring that immigrants are part of the 99%. Prior to the march, they hold a General Assembly to discuss possible actions if the city moves to evict the encampment from Justin Herman Plaza. During the meeting, people wave their fingers in the air to express agreement with the speaker. Other camp residents look through the books in the Occupy Library, or sit reading by their tents.

Sf

Sf2

Sf3

For more articles and images, see http://dbacon.igc.org

 

November 28, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (3)

Immigration Article of the Day: THE LATINO CYBER-MORAL PANIC PROCESS IN THE UNITED STATES

THE LATINO CYBER-MORAL PANIC PROCESS IN THE UNITED STATES by Nadia Yamel Flores-Yeffala, Guadalupe Vidales, April Plemons

Abstract In the past few decades, the anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States has been influenced, in part, by the massive immigration of Latinos to the United States. The internet technology in the Web 2.0 age offers a new medium in which this anti-immigrant movement can appear and create what Cohen calls a 'moral panic', which we claim to has become a Latino cyber-moral panic. Of a subsample taken from 170 anti-immigrant websites, the authors examine the role of internet in the creation of a cyber-moral panic against Latinos in the United States in which they find the classic stages of moral panic must be modified and updated. Facilitated by the internet, a 'call for civil action' stage is added to the classic moral panic process in which donations and direct civil and political action are sought from online visitors. Recycled information is spread via other anti-immigrant websites, blogs, forums, and other social media, helping to accelerate the moral panic process due to the ability to quickly spread information, reach those who have access to online technologies and hardware, the assumption of anonymity, etc. Using the updated moral panic process model, the authors apply these stages to the current nativist movement which has resulted in a wave of hate crimes against immigrants, several pieces of new anti-immigrant legislation, and fostered an environment widespread discrimination, oppression, and dehumanization against the contemporary 'folk devils', or Latinos in the United States.

KJ

November 28, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, November 27, 2011

Increase in little-used EB5 Investor Visa

From the San Francisco Examiner:

A visa program that puts rich foreigners who invest in the U.S. on the road to citizenship is picking up steam and could one day lead to hundreds of jobs and tens of millions of dollars in Bay Area investments, backers say.

In recent years, the once-sleepy EB-5 visa program has become the focus of global entrepreneurs on the hunt for secure investments and U.S. officials looking for ways to buoy a flailing U.S. economy.

Under the program, noncitizen investors who spend a million dollars — or $500,000 in an area with at least 150 percent of national unemployment — can qualify for an immigration visa that leads to a green card in two years. The catch: Their investment must create or maintain at least 10 U.S. jobs.

More such visas were requested last year than in any year since the program began in 1990, according to Marie Sebrechts, spokeswoman for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. A staggering 40.9 percent of those came from China.

Yet none of several regional center chiefs could name a single Bay Area project already undertaken with EB-5 money. In fact, many centers have had trouble closing a single deal funded by EB-5 investors. Read more...

bh

November 27, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Stretching the Truth, Michele Bachmann Claims that Newt is the Most Liberal Republican Candidate on Immigration

Michele Bachmann continued her attack on presidential hopeful Newt Gingrich as the most “liberal” Republican candidate for President, releasing a letter that she said indicates his support of amnesty for 11 million illegal workers. The letter was signed by Gingrich and other conservatives in support of President Bush's guest worker program. Gingrich said he could not understand Bachmann's reliance on the letter to show that he is pro-"amnesty" but stood by his position of a path to legalization for long term residents who are assimilated innto American social life.

KJ

November 27, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (1)

Sheriff Joe to Endorse Rick Perry for President?

Huffington Post reports that Sherriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona, an immigration enforcement zealot often a subject of ImmigrationProf posts, will endorse Governor Rick Perry for president, according to multiple sources. I am not sure whether this is what the Perry campaign needs to rejuvenate itself.

KJ

November 27, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, November 26, 2011

Sonoma County Doing Fine Accepting Mexican Consular ID Cards

rom the Associated Press

Sonoma County officials say they haven't seen any increase in crashes or crime under a policy that allows undocumented immigrants to avoid potential deportation when they're stopped for minor traffic violations.

The policy announced last month allows deputies to accept Mexican consular ID cards called matricula as identification when they stop drivers for infractions such as running stop signs.

Undocumented immigrants from Mexico can't obtain California driver's licenses and previously, when they were pulled over, authorities had to arrest them, which often led to deportation.

Sheriff's Lt. Glenn Lawrence says offending drivers are still cited but now they won't be taken into custody.

More than 1,000 police departments nationwide, including San Francisco's, accept the cards as valid ID.

bh

November 26, 2011 | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Newt to Draw Conservative Republican Backlash on Immigration?

ImmigrationProf reported earlier this week that Republican Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich had appeared to soften his positions on immigration at the most recent debate of the Republican candidates. Associated Press analyzes how Gingrich is risking drawing conservative ire just as he has become a frontrunner for the Republican nomination.

KJ

November 26, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 25, 2011

Another Wrongful Deportation

Dan Kowalski on LEXIS-NEXIS Immigration Law Community tells how, in 2009 ICE and EOIR deported Fred MacDonald, an S13 Canadian Born American Indian. In 2011 ICE admitted it was a mistake, because under INA Sec. 289, 8 C.F.R. 289 and Matter of Yellowquill, 16 I&N Dec. 576 (BIA 1979) S13 American Indians born in Canada are not subject to deportation. In two related federal cases, MacDonald is seeking damages; DOJ has moved to dismiss.

KJ

November 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)

Immigration Article of the Day: Rationing Family Values in Europe and America: An Immigration Tug of War between States and Their Supra-National Associations by Stephen H. Legomsky

LegomskyStephen_mug

"Rationing Family Values in Europe and America: An Immigration Tug of War between States and Their Supra-National Associations" Georgetown Immigration Law Review, Forthcoming.  STEPHEN H. LEGOMSKY, Washington University in Saint Louis - School of Law (Chief Counsel, Citizenship and Immigration Services).

Abstract:  Family reunification – for decades, the centerpiece of immigration policy practically everywhere – is under siege today in both Europe and the United States. Two trends, however, seem to have escaped notice. First, the most popular restriction strategies have been quantitative controls that “ration” family reunification by reducing or delaying admissions - as distinguished from qualitative immigrant “selection” policies that aim only to screen out individuals with undesirable personal attributes. Second, and perhaps counter-intuitively, the supra-national associations of which these very States are members have been pushing in precisely the opposite direction, constraining the powers of their constituent States to restrict family reunification. The result has been a tug of war, in which States adopt continually tighter restrictions, the supra-national associations respond by limiting States’ powers to restrict, and the States continue to test those limitations. This article documents and describes the increasing barriers to family immigration in the United States and the individual Member States of the European Union, highlights the more specific trend in favor of the rationing strategies, and contrasts the restrictive impulses of the EU Member States and the United States with the resistance from their own supra-national associations. It then hypothesizes several theories for that dissonance.

KJ

November 25, 2011 in Current Affairs | Permalink | TrackBack (0)