Thursday, September 25, 2008

Justice for Ana Romero

The Kentucky Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights is circulating a petition to demand answers about the death of Ana Romero, a 44-year-old mother who died at a jail in Franklin County, Kentucky, while in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
 
The petition raises questions about Romero's treatment during her detention:

Ana Romero (44 years old) was living and working in Shelbyville cleaning houses in order to support her 92 year-old mother and two grown sons in college in El Salvador. 
In January, she was arrested at home and detained by state police for giving federal immigration officials a false identification card, along with a previous immigration-related violation. This type of police action is part of the nation-wide ICE dragnet operation being carried out in places like Shelbyville, Kentucky; Pottsville, Iowa; New Bedford, Massachusetts; and Laurel, Mississippi, in which immigrants are being subjected to raids and detentions. These operations have torn families apart, including many U.S. citizens, and has instilled pervasive fear in our communities owing to the terrorizing tactics used by the authorities and the lack of due process afforded the immigrants afterwards. Whether or not you agree with the criminalization of immigrant workers and families who have entered the U.S. without documents, the consequences of the Ana Romero case should touch a nerve.  During her nearly 8 month imprisonment in the county jail while awaiting deportation, Ana was distraught and suffered from medical ailments, refusing to eat the food which she told family members “…stinks and there is something wrong with it.”   
Shortly before her death, she was placed in solitary confinement. Her jailers have yet to explain why this was done. 

KCIRR has been circulating an e-mail with information about how to sign on to the petition.

bh

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Comments

I believe this case is being grossly exaggerated. The fact of the matter is that Professor Hing and, an apologist and enabler for the illegal alien slave masters, indirectly and in his own small way, paved the way for Ana Romero to leave El Salvador, violate U.S. immigration law by entering the United States illegally, violate myriad other laws (taxation, employment, social security, welfare, housing) just so she could clean houses. Just how many house cleaners do we need? What about the fairness to prospective and possibly more deserving housecleaners from other countries? Ana Romero thought she was exempt from the law. In the minds of many, she got what she deserved.

Posted by: Susan Goya | Sep 25, 2008 5:17:04 PM

Susan, how can you possibly believe the case is being grossly exaggerated when I seriously doubt you know anything about it? The true enabler of the slavemasters here is you for feeding the beastly "blame the victim" mentality rather than attacking not only the broken immigration system but US foreign policy that has left El Salvador unable to offer its people a manner of supporting their families without migrating thousands of miles away to a country where they will be abused and, in cases like this, where their sacrifices with be rewarded with either murder or at the very least abuse of power and gross negligence. She was a human being and anyone who feels she got what she deserved should be ashamed of themselves.

Posted by: Raquelita | Sep 27, 2008 4:24:54 PM

Susan, how can you possibly believe the case is being grossly exaggerated when I seriously doubt you know anything about it? The true enabler of the slavemasters here is you for feeding the beastly "blame the victim" mentality rather than attacking not only the broken immigration system but US foreign policy that has left El Salvador unable to offer its people a manner of supporting their families without migrating thousands of miles away to a country where they will be abused and, in cases like this, where their sacrifices with be rewarded with either murder or at the very least abuse of power and gross negligence. She was a human being and anyone who feels she got what she deserved should be ashamed of themselves.

Posted by: Raquelita | Sep 27, 2008 4:25:29 PM

Susan I am disgusted by your comment. To say that this lady deserved what she got, regardless of opinion to say something like that is hate talk. I am ashamed that you have missed the point here. Life is above human laws (which we all know is imperfect). The "law" should not in any way demean, humiliate or incarcerate someone trying to make an honest living. And don't say it is not an hones living because she is not worthy of a stupid piece of paper. It is murder to drive someone to death because of such treatment.

Posted by: Enerio Romero | Nov 24, 2008 1:50:31 PM

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