Monday, March 31, 2008

Navarette Commentary: Immigration's yin and yang

Navarette Ruben Navarette Jr. writes about the irony of states passing anti-immigrant laws despite benefiting from undocumented workers in their states.

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2008/03/navarette-comme.html

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Comments

Enforce the Laws we have
There is a reason is called “illegal immigrants”.
I believe any one who wants to become an American should have a chance to do so.
We must enforce the Law’s we have.
Any one who is an Illegal Immigrant has insulted any legal immigrant who has gone through the proper channels and become naturalized.
If you do not like the laws change them!


Actual physical residence (within the state in which the petition is filed) during at least the three months immediately before filing for naturalization is another requirement.

Physical presence within the U.S. for a total of at least one half of the period of required continuous residence. That is, two and a half years for most applicants and one and a half years for spouses of U.S. Citizens.

The ability to read, write and speak ordinary English unless they are physically unable to do so due to a disability such as being blind or deaf, or suffer from a developmental disability or mental impairment. Those over 50 years old on the date of filing who have lived here for a total of at least 20 years after admission as a permanent resident and those who are over 55 and have been legal permanent residents for at least 15 years are also exempt from this requirement.

A basic understanding the fundamentals of U.S. history and government.

Good moral character and an affinity for the principles of the U.S. Constitution.

Continuous residence (but not necessarily physical presence) in the U.S. from the date of filing the naturalization application up to the date of being sworn in as a citizen.

Applicants should be at least 18 years of age at the time of filing. Certain exceptions exist, however, for the children of other permanent residents who are seeking naturalization.

Posted by: JGW | Apr 29, 2008 8:33:41 PM

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