Thursday, August 2, 2007

Restrictionist Law Prof in it for the Bucks?

Kris20kobach20in20classthumb Law Prof Kris Kobach (University of Missouri-Kansas City) worked with Hazleton, PA to craft and defend the anti-immigrant ordinance that was struck down last week by a federal judge.  In recent days, he has been seen on television, as well as quoted in the newspapers, railing about about how an "activist" judge thwarted Hazleton's efforts (some would just say that the judge was doing his job and faithfully applying the law).

I always figured that Kobach was readying himself for his next political campaign.    He currently serves as the chairman of the Kansas Republican Party, and in 2004, he ran as the Republican Party candidate for Congress in Kansas. The Pitch reports, however, that

"Thus far, [Kobach's] losing effort [for Hazleton] has been pretty lucrative. Last summer, Hazleton supporters created the “Small Town Defenders” fund, an online effort to raise money from citizens around the country to pay for the city’s defense. Since then, the fund has garnered plenty of media attention (Kobach has even promoted the effort on his Sunday-evening talk show on KMBZ 980) and raised approximately $300,000.

According to a story published today by the Wilkes Barre Times-Leader newspaper, Kobach has received a big chunk of the legal-fund cash. The Times-Leader reports that the Kansas lawyer has been paid $115,210 for his services.

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2007/08/restrictionist-.html

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And all those immigration lawyers with the AILF are working out of the goodness of their souls. Please, there is a lot more money on the open borders side to be had.

Posted by: Mitchell Young | Aug 3, 2007 1:05:34 AM

The Southern Poverty Law Center raises a lot more money than that and pay themselves way more than Kobach. Do you think they are 'in it for the bucks'?

A writer for Harper's exposed their money game and they are still at it:

Southern Poverty: richer than Tonga

Back in 2000, I wrote a story in Harper's about the Southern Poverty Law Center of Montgomery, Alabama, whose stated mission is to combat disgusting yet mostly impotent groups like the Nazis and the KKK. What it does best, though, is to raise obscene amounts of money by hyping fears about the power of those groups; hence the SPLC has become the nation's richest “civil rights” organization. The Center earns more from its vast investment portfolio than it spends on its core mission, which has led Millard Farmer, a death-penalty lawyer in Georgia, to once describe Morris Dees, the SPLC's head, as “the Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker of the civil rights movement” (adding, “I don't mean to malign Jim and Tammy Faye”).

When in 1978 the Center's treasury held less than $10 million, Dees said the group would stop fund-raising and live off interest when it hit $55 million. As he zeroed in on that target a decade later, Dees upped the ante to $100 million, which the group's newsletter promised would allow it “to cease the costly and often unreliable task of fund raising.” At the time of my story seven years ago, the SPLC's treasury bulged with $120 million, and the organization was spending twice as much on fund-raising as it did on legal services for victims of civil-rights abuses–yet its money-gathering machinery was still running without cease.

It's still going. Last week, a reader sent me the SPLC's 2005 financial filing with the IRS, which is required by law for charities. In five years, the SPLC's treasury had grown by a further $48 million, bringing its total assets to $168 million. That's more than the annual GDP of the Marshall Islands, and has the SPLC rapidly closing in on Tonga's GDP.

Revenues listed for the 2005 filing came to about $44 million, which dwarfed total spending ($29 million). Of that latter amount, nearly $5 million was spent to raise even more money, and over $8 million was spent on salaries, benefits, and other compensation. The next time you get a fund-raising pitch from the SPLC, give generously—but give to a group that will make better use of your money. Like Global Witness.

http://www.harpers.org/archive/2007/03/sb-this-week-in-1172847076

Posted by: Jack | Aug 3, 2007 3:35:26 AM

The Southern Poverty Law Center raises a lot more money than that and pay themselves way more than Kobach. Do you think they are 'in it for the bucks'?

A writer for Harper's long ago exposed their corruption:

Southern Poverty: richer than Tonga

Back in 2000, I wrote a story in Harper's about the Southern Poverty Law Center of Montgomery, Alabama, whose stated mission is to combat disgusting yet mostly impotent groups like the Nazis and the KKK. What it does best, though, is to raise obscene amounts of money by hyping fears about the power of those groups; hence the SPLC has become the nation's richest “civil rights” organization. The Center earns more from its vast investment portfolio than it spends on its core mission, which has led Millard Farmer, a death-penalty lawyer in Georgia, to once describe Morris Dees, the SPLC's head, as “the Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker of the civil rights movement” (adding, “I don't mean to malign Jim and Tammy Faye”).

When in 1978 the Center's treasury held less than $10 million, Dees said the group would stop fund-raising and live off interest when it hit $55 million. As he zeroed in on that target a decade later, Dees upped the ante to $100 million, which the group's newsletter promised would allow it “to cease the costly and often unreliable task of fund raising.” At the time of my story seven years ago, the SPLC's treasury bulged with $120 million, and the organization was spending twice as much on fund-raising as it did on legal services for victims of civil-rights abuses–yet its money-gathering machinery was still running without cease.

It's still going. Last week, a reader sent me the SPLC's 2005 financial filing with the IRS, which is required by law for charities. In five years, the SPLC's treasury had grown by a further $48 million, bringing its total assets to $168 million. That's more than the annual GDP of the Marshall Islands, and has the SPLC rapidly closing in on Tonga's GDP.

Revenues listed for the 2005 filing came to about $44 million, which dwarfed total spending ($29 million). Of that latter amount, nearly $5 million was spent to raise even more money, and over $8 million was spent on salaries, benefits, and other compensation. The next time you get a fund-raising pitch from the SPLC, give generously—but give to a group that will make better use of your money. Like Global Witness.

http://www.harpers.org/archive/2007/03/sb-this-week-in-1172847076

Posted by: Jack | Aug 3, 2007 3:35:46 AM

Please! Next you'll claim that immigration lawyers are just working for poor immigrants out of the goodness of their hearts. The recent Senate bill would have had lawyers reaping millions from taxpayer financed legal aid for assisting amnestied illegal aliens. Immigration lawyers have far more largess to gain from amnesty to illegal immigrants than those who oppose it, much of it from the taxpayer. Of course, that that would never come to light in this blog.

Posted by: Horace | Aug 3, 2007 3:58:28 AM

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