Friday, May 18, 2007

Immigration Reform DOA?

There is lots of mixed news about suport for the immigration reform bill unveiled by the Senate today.  Immigration law expert Peter Spiro on Opinio Juris (here) offers his "hunch" that immigration reform is dead.  In his view, "[i]t looks too much like the 1986 deal, coupling an amnesty with enhanced enforcement, the latter of which of course utterly failed."  Any thoughts?  Let's hear from you all.

KJ

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/immigration/2007/05/immigration_ref.html

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Comments

If the bill posted here is close to the final bill then it should be killed. It's a terrible bill.

Posted by: justin | May 18, 2007 3:20:09 PM

DOA, RIP. Special privilege for ethnic groups has no place in the American ethic, and the senate who votes for it will suffer for failing to listen to the voice of the people.

Posted by: Horace | May 18, 2007 5:08:00 PM

As I've said before in this blog, advocacy groups want the whole echalada or nothing. It's evident that their real agenda is to gain political power, and this bill won't do it fast enough. If the advocacy groups were a law firm, they wouldn't be considered to negotiating in the best interests of their client, because the proposed bill (what we know of it) is already too generous for most of the citizens of this country, and illegal aliens would be lucky to gain the proposed concessions. Advocacy group would rather have nothing at all if they can't have it entirely their way, and the version of the bill that goes to the House will undoubted be less palatable to them. Professor Hing told congress that he would rather have no guest worker program at all if the final bill doesn't contain provisions for family unity. You'll have it your way professor, as there will be no legislation passed this year.

Posted by: George | May 18, 2007 5:38:45 PM

Clearly the approximately 12 million undocumented workers need better advocacy groups. There doesn't seem to be much recognition or appreciation for all the good things this bill does. If these groups act recklessly, and aren't willing to compromise, these advocacy groups are going to lose whatever clout they have. Not to mention leave millions of people without papers and in fear. Fight for the best you can get, but without compromise nothing will ever be done about this problem.

Posted by: chris | May 18, 2007 9:43:38 PM

Clearly the approximately 12 million undocumented workers need better advocacy groups. There doesn't seem to be much recognition or appreciation for all the good things this bill does. If these groups act recklessly, and aren't willing to compromise, these advocacy groups are going to lose whatever clout they have. Not to mention leave millions of people without papers and in fear. Fight for the best you can get, but without compromise nothing will ever be done about this problem.

Posted by: chris | May 18, 2007 9:51:24 PM

Horace: I didn't know that this immigration bill gave special privileges to any specific ethnic group. Can you point out where?

Posted by: Justin | May 18, 2007 10:19:59 PM

Justin,

The prime beneficiary of this bill are Mexican Hispanics, something inferred by the fact that Hispanic adocacy groups are the prime advocates of illegal immigrants. You might try to refute that claim, but it would fly in the face of reason. The bill permits illegal aliens to avoid the penalty of the law, deportation. This bill will not change the Title 8 laws prohibiting illegal immigration, or change the penalty of deportation, but gives the millions who've managed to overwhelm our authorities the privilege of living and working in this country. It is a captitulation to those who challenge the will of the American citizen. Moreover, this bill is unfair to applicant for a green card still living in his homeland awaiting the call to our shores. You and your advocate friends say the we are only being realistic, that we should concede to coercion, that we cannot deport 20 million illegal aliens. Conceding to such coerciveness is just the rationalization of some French citizens to the reality of the German invasion during WWII. To hear the head of the Department of Homeland Security state that it is impossible to enforce our laws on this matter, and that it is possible to destroy our immigration system by simple acquiescing to the demands of a foreign mob, is disheartening indeed, as it can very well happen time and again under successive presidential administration.

What's next, the U.S. Attorney General assessing the crime rate in this country and coming to the conclusion that his department is so overwhelmed by criminals that it would be in our best interests to give amnesty to everyone who committed a crime prior to January 1st? He'd just declare all the wanted criminals to be on parole, that they should register, and if they didn't correct their ways they'd be arrested and put in jail. The new bill sets a precedence that can only lead to further illegal immigration, as others come, move into an underground economy, and await the next waive of amnesty.

The Senate bill is a case of, if you lack the will to enforce a law, then scrap it, no matter how much of a bad precedent would result.

Justin, if you don't view the Senate bill special privilege, then you don't understand the meaning of special privilege.

Posted by: Horace | May 19, 2007 6:47:58 AM

Hopefully, this bill will die in the Senate. I find it amazing to hear all of the excuses for passing this bill. I cannot think of any other country in the world that would give legal status to 20 million illegal immigrants. I personally think we can deal with the problem, by attrition and enforcement of our existing laws. How can I expect my government to do any better the second time around with this immigration bill. They've done such as terrible job with the last immigration reform bill passed. Hopefully, our Supreme Court will rule on the issue of states being able to enforce federal laws and then we will see states tackle the problems of illegal immigration one by one.

Posted by: Brian | May 19, 2007 11:17:55 AM

Did you notice Chertoff, Gutierrez, etc. all hailing Teddy Kennedy? Teddy obviously was the most effective politician in these secret meetings. The problem is that he is so extreme on this issue and may have gotten too much for the legislation to have a prayer with people who care about sovereignty, rule of law, fairness to those who played by the rules, those who care about the interests of American workers, etc. Teddy gave himself away at the press conference by talking exclusively about what this legislation will do for illegal aliens--not a word about what's in it for Americans. Seriously, it might as well have been Roger Mahoney talking he laid it on so thick. He even went to celebrate with those he cares most about--his American constituents? Heavens no. He met again with the people working illegally who were part of that no longer so recent worksite raid. He's still weeping over it apparently.

Posted by: Jack | May 20, 2007 6:01:17 AM

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