Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Ohio Statutory Framework of Abortion Laws After Dobbs

Download Summary: Ohio Statutory Framework for Abortion Laws After Dobbs (as of 6-27-2022)

 

OHIO ABORTION STATUTORY FRAMEWORK POST-DOBBS

I.  Ohio Laws on the Books That Have Been Enjoined or Not Enforced Under Roe

Telemedicine & Medical Abortions:  Only a physician can provide abortion-inducing drugs, physician must be physically present at administration of initial dose, exceptions for self-managed by woman and legal delivery. O.R.C. §§ 2919.123, 2919.124(B).  New 2021 version preliminarily enjoined by Planned Parenthood Sw. Ohio v. Ohio Dep’t of Health, No. A 2101148 (Hamilton Cty, Ohio, C.C.P. Apr. 20, 2021).  Earlier version enjoined for 12 years, limited to as-applied injunction, mooted on motion by Federal Drug Agency.  See Planned Parenthood of Sw. Ohio v. Dewine, 931 F.3d 530 (6th Cir. 2019), cert. denied, 141 S.Ct. 189 (2020).

Limitation of Backup Physician: Prohibits physicians affiliated with state institutions from being backup providers. Preliminarily enjoined, Women’s Med Dayton v. Vanderhoff, No. A2200704  (Ohio C.C.P. Apr. 15, 2022), second preliminary injunction granted (June 17, 2022).

“Dismemberment Feticide”: Prohibits D&E and D&X procedures, except to preserve life or physical health of mother. O.R.C. § 2919.15 (2019). Partially enjoined to permit D&E procedures before 18 weeks.  Planned Parenthood Sw. Ohio Region v. Yost, 375 F.Supp.3d 848 (S.D. Ohio 2019), reconsideration denied, 2020 WL 40143 (2020). 

Fetal Burial Law: Requires cremation or internment of fetal remains. O.R.C. § 3726.02 (2021), preliminarily enjoined by Planned Parenthood Sw. Ohio Region v. Ohio Dep't of Health, No. A2100870 (Ohio C.C.P. Jan. 31, 2022). 

Municipal Ban: A municipal ordinance in the City of Lebanon bans all abortions and those who “aid or abet,” but city stipulated it would not enforce after being sued by ACLU.  Ohio's Only Sanctuary City Chooses Not to Enforce Abortion Ban, Fox19News (May 26, 2022); Nat'l Assoc. Social Workers v. City of Lebanon, No. 1:22-cv-258 (S.D. Ohio May 11, 2022).

II. Ohio Abortion Regulations Currently In Effect That Have Criminal Penalties

Fetal “Heartbeat Protection Act”: O.R.C. § 2919.195(A), enjoined by Preterm-Cleveland v. Yost, 394 F. Supp. 3d 796 (S.D. Ohio July 3, 2019), injunction dissolved (S.D. Ohio June 24, 2022).  The law had not been structured as a trigger law, but operated as one when the district court dissolved the injunction upon emergency motion of the state immediately following the Dobbs decision and the law went into effect. Litigation continues in the case. The law prohibits abortion when a “fetal heartbeat has been detected” (5-6 weeks) except to prevent death or “serious risk of the substantial and irreversible impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant woman.”

*6/29/22: Ohio Lawsuit Filed to Enjoin 6 Week Ban on State Constitutional Grounds of Due Process, Equal Protection, and Freedom to Choose Health Care (includes complaint and memorandum)

20 Week Ban:  O.R.C. § 2919.201(A) prohibits abortion after twenty weeks post-fertilization (22 weeks), except to prevent death or serious physical impairment. An earlier law prohibits abortion after “viability” and requires viability testing at 20 weeks. O.R.C. §§ 2919.17, 2919.18.

“Abortion Manslaughter”:  First degree felony if purposely takes life or “fails to take measures” to “preserve the health or life” of “child born by attempted abortion who is alive when removed from the uterus.” O.R.C. § 2919.13 (eff. Mar. 23, 2022).

Minor Parental Notification or Judicial Bypass: O.R.C. §§ 2919.121, 2151.85, upheld in large part by Cincinnati Women’s Services, Inc. v. Taft, 468 F.3d 361 (6th Cir. 2006) (overturning limit on one judicial petition per pregnancy).

Down Syndrome Ban:  Ohio prohibits abortions if provider has knowledge of woman’s reasons related to Down syndrome of the fetus. O.R.C. § 2919.10(B) (2018).  The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (en banc), reversed a preliminary injunction enjoining the Ohio Down syndrome law, finding that there was no likelihood of success on the merits that this was an unconstitutional undue burden.  Preterm-Cleveland v. McCloud, 994 F.3d 512 (6th Cir. 2021).  However, in a subsequent decision, the Sixth Circuit declared a similar Tennessee Down syndrome law unconstitutional on grounds of void for vagueness and expressly noted that the Ohio decision had not address the vagueness issue. Memphis Center for Reproductive Health v. Slatery, 114 F.4th 409, 428-34 (6th Cir. 2021).

“Partial Birth Feticide”: O.R.C. § 2919.151(B) prohibits “partial birth procedure” of late term abortion when fetus is viable unless necessary to safe life or health of woman.

Woman’s Immunity: “Abortion” defined to include “purposeful termination” by “the pregnant woman herself.”  O.R.C. § 2919.11.  Exemption for Down syndrome prosecution.  O.R.C. § 2919.10(F).  Immunity for women for all bans passed, O.R.C. § 2919.198, enjoined in Yost, but injunction dissolved (S.D. Ohio June 24, 2022).

III.       Ohio’s Current Civil Framework Regulating Abortion

Many criminal prohibitions also carry civil liabilities for compensatory damages, exemplary damages, and attorney’s fees. E.g., O.R.C. §§ 2919.201; 2919.10; 2307.54.  Several permit the father to bring a civil action. E.g., O.R.C. § 2307.54 (20-week ban).

Other provider requirements are: (1) physician reporting, O.R.C. §§ 2919.171, 2919.101, 2919.202, 3701.79; (2) mandatory twenty-four-hour waiting period, O.R.C. § 2317.56; (3) counseling, O.R.C. § 2317.56; (4) determine fetal heartbeat. O.R.C. § 2919.191 (eff. 6/24/22).

IV.  Ohio’s Fetal Personhood Laws

“Intentionally aborted fetuses” are not considered “persons.” O.R.C. § 2901.01(B).

Fetal personhood law proposed in the Human Life Protection Act to define “unborn child” from the date of fertilization.  OH HB 598 (proposed Rev. O.R.C. § 2904.02(E)). The Act would also impose a total ban on all surgical and medical abortions, except as necessary to “prevent death” or “a serious risk of the substantial and irreversible impairment of a major bodily function of the pregnant individual.” OH SB 123 (introduced 3/2021); OH HB 598 (introduced 3/2022); see generally Ohio Policy Evaluation Network (tracking Ohio abortion laws and legislation).

 

See also Ohio Democratic Lawmakers Propose a Constitutional Amendment to Protect Abortion Rights (Joint Resolution requiring 3/5 vote of legislators to place on ballot for vote) (May 17, 2022)

 

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