Monday, December 27, 2021

Hair Rules: Race, Gender, and Stigmatization in Schools

Patricia A. Banks has published Hair Rules: Race, Gender, and Stigmatization in Schools in Volume 25 of the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Law and Social Change. The abstract summarizes: 

As laws banning racial hair discrimination in schools are proposed across the United States, it is increasingly important to understand how grooming policies can stigmatize students. This essay engages social science theory and research on stigmatization and the case of Arnold v. Barbers Hill Independent School District to investigate the cultural constructions of male students who wear long locs. Drawing on content analysis of court documents around this Texas lawsuit involving two black male cousins who were disciplined in school because of refusing to cut their locs, I examine how school officials justified the school district’s hair rules through associating the defendants’ hairstyle with a range of stigmatizing attributes. The conclusion considers the potential for this court case, as well as hair discrimination legislation, to mitigate the stigmatization of boys who wear long locs, long braids, and long twists. I argue that to fully address the stigmatization of boys who wear these styles, laws and policies must be attentive to race as well as gender.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/gender_law/2021/12/hair-rules-race-gender-and-stigmatization-in-schools.html

Constitutional, Education, Gender, Race | Permalink

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