Gender and the Law Prof Blog

Editor: Tracy A. Thomas
University of Akron School of Law

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Law & Gender Programs at AALS

A Conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will join in a question and answer session moderated by AALS President Vicki Jackson, Thurgood Marshall Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School. During the conversation, Justice Ginsburg will discuss her life, career, and commitment to law and to legal education.

Two programs on the 19th Amendment: Programs on the History and Modern Implications of the 19th Amendment

Discussion Group, The Role of Women as International, Regional, and National Judges

The members of this discussion group are experts who have studied the role of women as adjudicators within international, international criminal, regional, and national tribunals. In this program, they will assess the historical and present role of female judges at different tribunals, examining the premise that women judge differently than men. Discussants will focus on questions of adequate gender representation on these tribunals’ benches and on questions of legitimacy for tribunals whose benches are not particularly gender-diverse. They will also suggest policies that would better enable women to participate in international, regional, and national adjudication and would ameliorate women’s experience on the bench.

Discussion Group Participant: Bridget J. Crawford, Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law

Discussion Group Participant: Ms. J. Jarpa Dawuni, Howard University

Discussion Group Participant: Nienke Grossman, University of Baltimore School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Fernanda Giorgia Nicola, American University, Washington College of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Dr. Heather Roberts, Ph.D., Australian National University College of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Leila N. Sadat, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law
Discussion Group Moderator: Milena Sterio, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University
Discussion Group Participant: Ms. Shana Tabak, Tahirih Justice Center
 
Extended Program, Women in Legal Education, Gender Equity at Work
This session will explore issues concerning gender equity in the workplace, including the legal profession and legal academia. An introductory panel featuring Vice Provost Adrienne Davis and Dean Angela Onwuachi-Wilig will explore issues concerning gender equity in the workplace, including the legal profession and legal academia. Following the panel discussion, participants will attend their choice of two small moderated discussion groups that will focus on the following issues:
    Gender Equity in Law School and University Leadership
    Gender Equity in the Tenure-Stream Process
    Gender Equity in Contract Positions
    Gender Equity in the Legal Profession
    Gender Equity in the Workplace
    Gender Equity and our Students
 
Women in Law Education, Teaching Law in a #MeToo World
This session will focus on how we teach law in the age of #Metoo, Time’s Up, Justice Kavanaugh, Intersectionality, President Trump, Proper Pronoun Use, the Women’s March, and other recent developments. This session will consider how we, in our capacity as law teachers, are adapting our teaching as the world around us changes. Panelists will discuss their teaching innovations: courses they created or adapted or other ways in which they have engaged with students in this #MeToo World.

Following the panel presentations, there will be an audience engagement segment in the form of break-out group discussions. Each panelist will co-lead a break-out group. The group discussions will provide interested professors in the audience with an opportunity to think about how they too can create or adapt a course for our #Metoo world. Panelists will provide leadership by offering guidance and inspiration to professors who want to create their own #Metoo teaching innovation.
 
Speaker from a Call for Papers: Nancy C. Cantalupo, Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law
Speaker from a Call for Papers: Blanche B. Cook, University of Kentucky College of Law
Speaker from a Call for Papers: L. Camille Hebert, The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law
Moderator: Rona Kaufman, Duquesne University School of Law
Speaker from a Call for Papers: Deana A. Pollard-Sacks, Texas Southern U Thurgood Marshall School of Law
Speaker from a Call for Papers: Elizabeth M. Schneider, Brooklyn Law School
 
Reproductive Rights and Justice in Law and Politics
In January 2020, as we launch a new election cycle, one of the most pressing issues facing the country is the state of reproductive rights and justice. In early 2020, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in June Medical Services v. Gee, a case that will give the newly composed Court its first opportunity to reshape the constitutional law of abortion. This panel will bring together experts in this field to assess the state of abortion, access to contraception, pregnancy discrimination protections, and other issues that shape the landscape of reproductive rights and justice. Panelists will consider these issues longitudinally, focusing on how public opinion on these questions has been shaped by both law and politics. Panelists will also consider the current political moment, focusing on the Trump Administration’s efforts to regulate access to reproductive care, pending cases, and the role that these issues will play in the 2020 election.
 
Speaker: Maya Manian, Howard University School of Law
Moderator: Melissa E. Murray, New York University School of Law
Speaker: Kate Shaw, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
Speaker: Neil S. Siegel, Duke University School of Law
Speaker: Reva B. Siegel, Yale Law School
 
Teaching Criminal Law and Criminalization: Race, Class, Gender, and Beyond
This program will explore ways in which to broaden our syllabi to include teaching the socio-political and cultural determinants of criminal law and criminalization. A major focus will be to consider how to incorporate discussions about inequalities of race, class, wealth, gender, immigration status, and so on, when teaching criminal law.
 
Speaker: Maryam Ahranjani, University of New Mexico School of Law
Moderator and Speaker: Jenny E. Carroll, University of Alabama School of Law
Speaker: Emily Hughes, University of Iowa College of Law
Speaker: Russell A. McClain, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Speaker: Alice G. Ristroph, Brooklyn Law School
 
The Unequal Workplace: Well-being at Stake
Inequity leads to a decline in the well-being of individuals and organizations. Legal culture is obsessed with rank and hierarchy, resulting in power and privilege historically dominated by straight, white men. This panel examines the origins of law’s unhealthy infatuation with hierarchy, the social inequality that the culture of hierarchy engenders, and the biological impact that social inequality has on our well-being. The panel explores how privilege can result in a lack of awareness of, curiosity about, empathy for, and exposure to life experiences and perspectives of women, LGBTQIA individuals, people of color, first-generation individuals, and others with challenging economic circumstances. The speakers provide ideas for addressing implicit bias, teaching cultural competency, developing cultural capital in marginalized groups, developing leadership skills to support and work with diverse persons in a variety of workplaces, and preparing students to recognize and successfully deal with instances of discrimination they may encounter in the legal profession.
 
Speaker: Renee N. Allen, University of Tennessee College of Law
Moderator: Deborah Lee Borman, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law
Speaker: Cindy Galway Buys, Southern Illinois University School of Law
Speaker: DeShun Harris, Texas A&M University School of Law
Speaker: Alicia Jackson, Florida A&M University College of Law
Speaker: Lucy Jewel, University of Tennessee College of Law
Speaker: Nicholas A. Mirkay, III, University of Hawaii, William S. Richardson School of Law
Speaker: Palma Joy Strand, Creighton University
Speaker: Ms. Elaine Sylvester, Esq., Gunderson Dettmer LLP
Speaker: Angela K. Upchurch, Southern Illinois University School of Law
 
Authors Meet Readers: Unequal Profession: Race and Gender in Legal Academia by Meera E. Deo (Thomas Jefferson School of Law)
In Unequal Profession: Race and Gender in Legal Academia (Stanford University Press, 2019) Professor Deo shares results from the first formal empirical study of law faculty at all stages of the career and with an emphasis on raceXgender challenges and opportunities. The qualitative and quantitative findings from original interview and survey data reveal a national pattern of intersectional bias. The data reveal ongoing gender-based barriers to hiring, promotion, and leadership. Classroom confrontations and biased course evaluations have devastating effects on tenure. Colleagues who “mansplain”, “hepeat”, and silence marginalized faculty contribute to higher attrition rates for female professors of color. Data from various sources make clear that these problems are systemic throughout legal practice and other professions. Unequal Profession outlines individual strategies that have facilitated success for many study participants and can be adapted for others. Necessary structural solutions are also emphasized in the book.
 
Speaker: Meera Deo, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Speaker: Matthew L.M. Fletcher, Michigan State University College of Law
Speaker: Rachel F. Moran, University of California, Los Angeles School of Law
Speaker: Melissa E. Murray, New York University School of Law
Moderator: Angela I. Onwuachi-Willig, Boston University School of Law
 
 
Balance in Legal Education, Legal Workplace Inequities and Impact on Women’s Health
The negative impact of academic workplace inequities may impact law school teaching and affect law students and their views of the structure of the legal workplace. Law school leaders and firm leaders may be unaware of the adverse physical and mental health outcomes resulting from workplace inequities. Professor Ceynar will discuss the study described in her article, “Dancing Backwards in High Heels: Female Professors Experience More Work Demands and Special Favor Requests, Particularly from Academically Entitled Students,” and make recommendations for improvement of inequities for women in the workplace. Attorney and Hispanic Bar President Leila Jade Levi will discuss the inequities in the legal profession that lead to a disintegration of well-being for lawyers. Levi works to improve how lawyers of color, particularly female lawyers of color, navigate the legal profession, whether improving boundaries at work, handling microaggressions, or thoughtful self-care for improvement of the treatment of lawyers.

Moderator: Deborah Lee Borman, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, William H. Bowen School of Law
Speaker: Dr. Michelle Ceynar, Ph.D., Pacific Lutheran University
Speaker: Ms. Leila Jade Levi, Esq., National Women's Law Center
 
Breastfeeding Law and Policy
Despite the ubiquity of the phrase “breast is best,” the law has fallen short of providing breastfeeding parents the support they require to meet their breastfeeding goals. Many breastfeeders have experienced discrimination, harassment, and roadblocks to their breastfeeding plans. Further, the wide differences in breastfeeding rates across race, class, and education level are powerful indicators that there is not equal access to breastfeeding support. This discussion group seeks to explore the varied and overlapping legal and policy issues presented by breastfeeding. Is breastfeeding a public health issue? Is it a civil rights issue? Are the messages and methods used to encourage breastfeeding feminist or anti-feminist? Do they encourage parents regardless of gender to breastfeed or chestfeed? Further, how is the discussion about breastfeeding law and policy reflective of the larger debates about women’s roles and the changing American family?
 
Discussion Group Moderator: Meghan Boone, University of Alabama School of Law
Discussion Group Moderator: Mathilde Cohen, University of Connecticut School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Melanie D. DeRousse, University of Kansas School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Andrea Freeman, University of Hawaii, William S. Richardson School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Marcy Karin, University of the District of Columbia, David Clarke School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Ms. Pamela Laufer-Ukeles, Academic Center for Law and Science
Discussion Group Participant: Solangel Maldonado, Seton Hall University School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Melissa E. Murray, New York University School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Dara E. Purvis, The Pennsylvania State University – Penn State Law
Discussion Group Participant: Darren Rosenblum, Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law
Discussion Group Participant: Naomi Schoenbaum, The George Washington University Law School
Discussion Group Participant: Ms. Julie C. Suk, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
Discussion Group Participant: Carol Suzuki, University of New Mexico School of Law
 
Full AALS Program here.
 
 

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