Gender and the Law Prof Blog

Editor: Tracy A. Thomas
University of Akron School of Law

Friday, July 17, 2015

The incredible dearth of women in tech firms

Tracy Chou, a young tech professional with Pinterest, started blogging about the dearth of women in the tech world.  The story is in the latest issue of Mother Jones.  Here are some of her findings: 

The numbers were as bad as you might expect: Just 17 of Yelp's 206 engineers (8 percent) were women, for example. Dropbox was barely better, with 26 out of 275 (9 percent). Nextdoor, a social-media tool for neighborhoods, had 29 engineers—all male. Change.org, which bills itself as "the world's platform for change," had less than 13 percent women engineers; it has since changed for the better, with 20 percent.*

Chou's project helped fuel the wave of public criticism that has shamed big companies into coming clean. Seven months after the launch, Google disclosedthat 17 percent of its tech staff is female. (Chou heard that her Medium post had made it all the way to cofounder Larry Page.) Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo, and dozens of other companies coughed up their stats not long after: Most reported between 10 and 20 percent women in "tech" positions—which can be pretty loosely defined. Some household names, like IBM, Netflix, and Zynga, still have yet to produce meaningful diversity data. "The crowdsourced stuff is way better and more reliable than the official party line," notes Silicon Valley diversity consultant Nicole Sanchez, whom Github recently hired as a VP. (The racial diversity numbers are equally cringeworthy; see our related story on Jesse Jackson's efforts in Silicon Valley.)
 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/gender_law/2015/07/the-incredible-dearth-of-women-in-tech-firms.html

Technology, Work/life, Workplace | Permalink

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