Friday, February 23, 2024

State Spotlight: Overhaul of Indiana Child Support Guidelines

On October 17, 2023, the Indiana Supreme Court issued an Order amending the Indiana Child Support Rules and Guidelines for the first time since they were first established in 1989.  These amendments became effective on January 1, 2024. 

The Indiana Court times summarizes the key changes to the Rules and Guidelines:

Child support obligation worksheets and deviations by agreement

The revisions emphasize the requirement of both filing a child support obligation worksheet and including it in the court’s record, regardless of parties’ agreement. In addition, when the court deviates from the recommended amount on the worksheet, the parties must supply a justification or explanation for the agreement beyond stating “parties agree to deviate.” This clarification ensures the court receives and records the reasons behind any deviation from the support owed to the child. This is vital for future modifications as well as future child support guideline revisions.

Calculating parenting time credit

The updated guidelines introduce a new and more precise method for calculating parenting time credit when a parent spends a varying number of overnights with different children. This change acknowledges the intricate dynamics of modern families and ensures the child support system accurately accounts for these nuances.

Removal of the 6% rule

The committee removed the 6% rule for uninsured health care costs, which had caused confusion that led to its limited usefulness. Instead, the committee notes uninsured health care expenses should be considered an “add-on” in the same way health insurance premiums are currently treated under the guidelines, with parents sharing the cost in proportion to their incomes. The weekly support schedule was adjusted to remove the expenses from the basic support obligation. These adjustments simplify and clarify the handling of medical expenses without changing the pre-existing obligation on either parent.

Revisions to weekly support schedules

The economic model underpinning the current child support schedule relies on family economic theories and consumer data from the 1970s. The revised weekly support schedule reflects more current child-rearing costs and is calculated using the Rothbarth economic model. In general, the adoption of these new estimates has led to increased obligations for parents across all income levels, except for those falling under the low-income adjustment. The low-income adjustment in the shaded portion of the weekly support schedule is now based on the combined income of both parents, rather than one.

Read more here.

February 23, 2024 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 12, 2019

Brazilian Twin Brothers Forced to Pay Child Support After Inconclusive Paternity Test

From Fox News:

Twin brothers in Brazil are being forced to each pay child support after a paternity test was unable to confirm who the father of a newborn baby is.

The identical twins refused to admit who the father of the baby girl was in an attempt to avoid making support payments. After additional DNA testing was done and returned inconclusive, a judge made the decision to hold them both accountable for supporting the child.

The brothers, whose identities remain anonymous, have been using their physical similarities to trick women into thinking they were the other person.

“They each used the other’s name, either to attract as many women as possible or to hide betrayal in their relationships,” the ruling judge wrote in a statement.

Read more here.

April 12, 2019 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, International, Paternity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Anthem Indiana Joins Indiana Legal Services to Provide Medicaid Consumers Access to Free Legal Services

From The Associated Press:

Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield Indiana (Anthem) today announced the launch of a new medical-legal partnership pilot with Indiana Legal Services to improve the health and quality of life of Medicaid consumers in Central Indiana through free legal assistance. This first-of-its-kind partnership will offer legal counseling for issues with housing and utilities, income support, education and employment and family law, including guardianship, child support, child welfare and custody.

The program will be available to all Central Indiana Medicaid consumers, including those in the Healthy Indiana Plan (HIP), Hoosier Healthwise, Hoosier Care Connect and traditional Fee-For-Service.

“This program exemplifies Anthem’s commitment to not only providing healthcare services but also looking for innovative programs that help address other issues that impact health and quality of life,” said Dr. Kimberly Roop, Medicaid plan president at Anthem Indiana. “We know Medicaid consumers have a broad range of civil legal needs and providing access to attorney services will help remove a social barrier to their overall well-being.”

Read more here.

March 21, 2019 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, Current Affairs, Custody (parenting plans), Paternity, Property Division | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Pregnancy and Divorce

From Lawyers.com (Gerard F. Miles):

Couples going through a divorce are amid one of life’s most stressful episodes. When there is a pregnancy involved, the emotions and tension are amplified. When a baby is on the way, an already difficult situation becomes even more complicated. During a typical divorce, emotions run high as each decision and agreement are legally formalized. It can be dizzying for anyone trying to prepare themselves for the next phase of their life; one without their spouse. When a pregnancy is involved, a child brings the concerns for an additional person into the mix.

Working Together to Be Apart
Divorcing couples may benefit from an intermediary who can help to fairly divide their marital assets. Beyond that, a counselor may be able to help both divorcing parents remain focused on the future needs of the baby, who will surely benefit most from a peaceful and well-considered parental breakup.

Parental Planning
Parents want the best for their children, and children fare much better in life when their parents work together to address their needs. Often, these needs are best assessed even before the baby arrives. Typically, parents planning for a baby discuss all aspects of preparations. This is crucial in instances where co-parents will be living separately. In these cases, it is worthwhile to come up with a parenting plan.

Read more here.

March 20, 2019 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, Current Affairs, Custody (parenting plans), Divorce (grounds), Paternity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Active Duty Military Parents and Child Support

From Lawyers.com:

Are you divorced and have been called to active duty with the military? If so, there are several factors to consider when it comes to paying your child support. The Child Support Enforcement Division (CSE) works with active duty parents to ensure that the child support remains paid in full and on time.

A few aspects to be aware of include:

 

  • If you pay child support and the payments are withheld directly from your paycheck, the CSE can transfer the income withholding from your civilian employer to the Department of Defense (DFAS) so that your child support will be deducted from your military pay. There may be some delay before the income withholding at DFAS goes into effect.
  • Your monthly income may be greatly reduced after a call to military duty. The change in income may justify a change in the amount of the child support order. Only a court can modify the amount of your child support order; however DOR can assist you in asking the court for a reduction.

Read more here.

 

October 4, 2018 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, July 27, 2018

Planning for Special Needs Children in Divorce

From The New Jersey Law Journal:

Unfortunately, the rate of divorce is exceptionally high—80-90 percent—among families of children with special needs. It is critical that family law practitioners understand the unique issues that arise in these cases. While all divorces are emotional and fraught with concerns about both short and long-term issues, divorce proceedings for parents of a child with special needs must be viewed through the lens of the long-term realities of disability. This is particularly true for children with complex or severe disabilities, who will require lifetime supports and services. Unlike “typical” kids, these children will never outgrow their need for assistance with basic decision-making, activities of daily living, self-care, etc. However, even children with mild disabilities may require specialized planning during a divorce due to their unique needs.

When a child is a minor, and custody or parenting time is at issue in a divorce, any special needs the child has must be considered when making final decisions. Children with autism or sensory processing issues, for example, may have a more difficult time transitioning between homes regularly. One home—or parent—may be better equipped to safely manage a child’s disability-related needs due to knowledge, work scheduling issues, other individuals in the home, etc. As with all custody discussions, the “best interests of the child” should prevail. Similarly, in terms of child support, additional expenses may need to be built in beyond the mandated guidelines to account for necessary therapies, private tutoring or education, specialized medications, items not covered by insurance, etc.

Read more here.

July 27, 2018 in Child Support (establishing), Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 14, 2016

California Child Support: The 10 Most Frequently Asked Questions Answered

From The Huffington Post:

  1. How is it determined? Child support in California is based on a statewide guideline. The formula by which it is determined is rather complex. As a result, it is usually calculated by attorneys using one of a few computer programs licensed by companies that provide legal research software. The calculation is based upon the number of children, the income of each of the parents, the timeshare that each parent has custody, their tax filing status, and their tax-deductible expenses;

  2. Is there a dollar limit on the amount of support that one can be ordered to pay? Unlike some states, California does not provide for a cap in the amount of support to be ordered. The guideline calculation is the presumptively legal calculation in most cases. There are some very limited instances when the court can deviate from this, discussed below.

  3. What happens if the calculation generates an amount that is clearly higher than what is necessary to raise a child? The guideline calculation may or may not generate such a result. What is necessary to raise a child varies on a case-by-case basis. The law provides that a child is entitled to have a lifestyle commensurate with that of his or her parents. For this reason, a child support calculation that improves the lifestyle of the lower income parent is often upheld by the court. In those instances when the child support amount is so excessive that it bears no reasonable relationship to either the lifestyle of the parents or the amount of support required to raise a child commensurate with that lifestyle, the court may deviate from the guideline.

Read the answers and more here.

 
 

October 14, 2016 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, Divorce (grounds) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

International Recovery of Child Support

From Jeanne M. Hannah writing for Updates in Family Law:

Melissa Kucinski, an American Bar Association colleague who practices in Washington, D.C., advises today that on this day, August 30, 2016, President Obama signed the instrument of ratification for the Hague Convention on International Recovery of Child Support and Other Forms of Family Maintenance.

The official statement by NSC Spokesperson Ned Price on The Hague Convention on International Recovery of Child Support and Other Forms of Family Maintenance may be read at this link. While the United States has child support enforcement well in hand, the same has not been true in other countries. This Convention is intended to remedy non-support cases where the payer of support resides in a foreign country and fails to provide court-ordered child support. The Convention's purpose is to assist custodial parents in enforcement proceedings in their state courts for collection of financial support due from parents residing outside of the United States.

Read more here.

September 13, 2016 in Child Support (establishing), International, Resources - Child Support | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Colorado Domestic Violence Survivors and Teen Parents Have Less Hurdles for Childcare Assistance

From the Denver Post:

Under Colorado House Bill 1227, teenagers and victims of domestic violence will have one less barrier to applying for assistance for day care. The current law requires anyone requesting for assistance to pay for childcare to apply for child support within 30 days of the application. The new law exempts teenagers and victims of domestic violence from child support enforcement requirements.

Read more here.

June 1, 2016 in Child Support (establishing), Domestic Violence | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, January 24, 2016

Pennsylvania Supreme Court Holds Stepfather Liable for Child Support

From Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:

A stepfather who sought legal and physical custody of his ex-wife's children can be liable for child support, the state Supreme Court has ruled.

The Supreme Court ruled on a 3-1 vote last week in A.S. v. I.S. that when a stepparent takes aggressive legal steps toward assuming the same parental rights as the child's biological parent, the stepparent assumes parental obligations.

Justice Max Baer, who wrote the majority's opinion, said a parent's in loco parentis status — meaning he or she assumed parental obligations without going through legal adoption — doesn't create a child support obligation.

“Here, we have a stepfather who hauled a fit parent into court, repeatedly litigating to achieve the same legal and physical custodial rights as would naturally accrue to a biological parent,” Justice Baer said, adding “this is not the ‘typical case’ of a stepparent” who wants a post-separation relationship with the children.

The decision reversed both the trial court's ruling that the stepfather should not owe child support and the Superior Court's affirming decision.

Chief Justice Thomas G. Saylor issued a dissenting opinion arguing there was an insufficient record in the case because the trial court dismissed the mother's complaint for child support at the pleadings stage.

Read more here.

January 24, 2016 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Kansas Sperm Donor Fights Back After State Forces Him to Pay Child Support

From WTHITV.com:

It’s probably one of the most bizarre Craigslist transaction, involving a lesbian couple desperate for a sperm donor, and a Topeka man willing to help.

Little did he know that act of kindness would lead to a lengthy child support battle that continues to this day. Recently this controversial case led to a court ordered DNA test that revealed he is a father, “I’m the sperm donor, I’m not the father,” William Marotta said.

If Marotta had a nickel for every time he’s said that in the past three years, he’d have enough money to pay off the amount the state of Kansas wants in back child support, “Cause it would be really easy for me to just pay off the money and be done,” Marotta said. “But that’s not the point, shouldn’t have been done in the first place, it’s wrong.”

The person he believes is responsible for the wrongdoing, Governor Sam Brownback, “I believe he’s sat down with a group of his people and said ‘okay,this is what I want to do, how do we accomplish that.’”

This all started when Marotta donated his sperm to the lesbian couple in 2009 after seeing their post on craigslist. Marotta accepted to help the couple, and later that year the couple had a little girl, “Angie and Jennifer are the parents,” Marotta said.

However the state of Kansas won’t accept that. Despite the fact that the lesbian couple and Marotta signed a contract giving up all parental rights to the child.

Read more here.

September 15, 2015 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, June 26, 2015

New Georgia Law Permits DNA Testing for Child Support

From Florida Times-Union:

Under a new law, the Department of Human Services will now be able to conduct DNA tests for all child support cases in which paternity is unresolved.

DHS met on Wednesday in Atlanta to discuss changing its internal rules to fit HB568 that will go into effect July 1.

Under the new law, any man that is proven not to be the biological father will not have to pay child support. The bill was intended to end wrongful paternity claims prior to legal action.

Read more here.

June 26, 2015 in Child Support (establishing), Paternity | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Child Support Laws and How They Actually Work

From Deseret News:

The public views court-ordered formulas calculating child support in the United States and England to be unfair, according to a study released Monday that researchers hope will be valuable information for policymakers dealing with family law issues.

Although child support laws in the two nations differ, the study, published by the Child and Family Blog, found that respondents from the U.S. and England have similar personal views on what is fair in calculating child support paid by noncustodial parents.

The research ultimately found that the public believes child support should be adjusted higher or lower based on the mother's income (assuming she is the custodial parent caring for the children). In some states, child support is based solely on the noncustodial parent's income, while in others both incomes are used in the calculation with an emphasis on the noncustodial parent's income. Each state has a set formula for judges to use in child support cases.

Read more here.

June 17, 2015 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

WI Ruling on Child in Same-Sex Separation

From Star Tribune:

MADISON, Wis. — A state appeals court says a woman who separated from her same-sex partner doesn't have to pay child support, and still has visitation rights with her partner's biological child whom they raised together.

Read more here.

MR

October 8, 2013 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 25, 2012

Child Support MA Case

From Bloomberg Family Law Reporter:

While it is within a trial court's discretion to order child support when parents share physical custody of their child, such an award may not be used to equalize their incomes, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled Aug. 15. Explaining that income equalization is inconsistent with principles underlying support orders, the court also noted that the trial judge below did not find that the subject child's reasonable needs were not being met in the absence of such an order, where both parents enjoyed comparable standards of living and had incomes exceeding the levels to which the support guidelines presumptively applied (M.C. v. T.K., Mass., No. 10910, 8/15/12).

Read more here.

MR

Hat Tip: Naomi Cahn

August 25, 2012 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Father Sentenced for Child Support Arrears in Excess of $500,000

The story of one Michigan man's serious child support issues:

The Muskegon man has fathered 23 children with 14 women, and is more than $533,000 in arrears in his child-support payments, according to the attorney general's office, which has been pushing a case against Veal -- tied to two of those children -- in Kent County Circuit Court.

On Thursday, Judge Dennis Leiber sentenced Veal, 44, to two to four years in prison for failure to pay child support, a felony. With this sentence, the judge far exceeded the state guidelines, which called for Veal to get no more than six months in the county jail.

"You are the poster child for irresponsibility," Leiber told Veal, who appeared surprised by the sentence. "You're an insult to every responsible father who sacrifices to provide for their children."

Read more here.

AC

October 3, 2010 in Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 10, 2010

Child Support & Filiation in Missouri

News report on changes to MO law that make it easier for fathers to challenge child support orders based on paternity:

It didn’t take long for Michael W. to confirm that the 2½-year-old girl for whom he was paying child support wasn’t really his biological daughter.

He just had a DNA test done one weekend when she was with him for visitation.

But it has taken three years since then for Michael, 35, to finally make his case to a judge that he should not have to keep making those payments.

Until a new law went into effect last year, Michael and other men like him were stuck. Even if they had DNA evidence proving that they were not the biological fathers, they still were obligated to make child support payments until the child turned 18.

But Michael and thousands of other such Missouri men now have the opportunity to legally answer the paternity question and, perhaps, get out from under payments that they think are unfair.

The new law allows men broader opportunities to petition courts to order DNA testing and then set aside paternity judgments and child support obligations.

Under the new law, any man paying child support can file a challenge to the paternity question until Dec. 31, 2011. After that, men will have two years to file such lawsuits after judgments of paternity or support have been entered.

The old law permitted such challenges for only a year. Previously, the presumed father had to prove fraud — that is, that the woman had lied to him about being the father.

The Missouri General Assembly moved to change the law after an appeals court ruled in January 2009 that despite Michael’s proof that he was not the father, state law offered no help.

“He is certainly correct that scientific advancements in the determination of parentage raise new issues not previously addressed,” the appeals court wrote. “This court, however, is not the legislature. Whether our statutes are inadequate in light of scientific advancements to provide appropriate relief to these types of cases is a question better suited for the legislature.”

Lawyers cautioned, however, that a man who was not the father still could be ordered to pay child support.

After DNA testing is complete, the law calls for a judgment that is “in the best interest of the parties,” a new and untested standard that has not yet been refined by case law and appeals courts. Under the old system, the “best interests of the child” prevailed.

Read the full article here.

AC

September 10, 2010 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 3, 2010

NY Court Requires Same Sex Partner to Pay Child Support

From the WSJ blog:

A New York state appellate court ... became the first in the state to rule that a same-sex partner may be liable for child support.

The case of H.M. v. E.T involved a one-time lesbian couple who allegedly agreed to conceive a child through artificial insemination.

But after the baby was born, E.T. — the non-biological parent — ended the relationship. H.M. argued that  she relied on her former partner’s promise of support when she decided to give birth to the child.

H.M. has stated a viable cause action for child support, a New York appellate court ruled. In prior ruling in the state, the court noted, fathers who have denied paternity have still been required to pay child support if they had developed a relationship with a child and had promised to support the child.

“By parity of reasoning, we hold that where the same-sex partner of a child’s biological mother consciously chooses, together with the biological mother, to bring that child into the world through [artificial insemination,] and where the child is conceived in reliance upon the partner’s implied promise to support the child, a cause of action for child support . . .has been sufficiently alleged,” the court ruled.

Read more news coverage here or the opinion here.

AC

September 3, 2010 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 28, 2010

Child Support Law in Quebec

From Examiner.com:

The lawyer who represented the woman known as "Lola" in a high profile child support case is in court for a similar case involving six women who feel Quebec's child support benefits are unfair and unconstitutional.

Anne-France Goldwater is alleging children of divorce in Quebec are victims of discrimination because child support payments are often lower than those in other provinces and child support is cut in half in joint custody cases.

Read more here.

MR

June 28, 2010 in Child Support (establishing) | Permalink | Comments (8) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, May 11, 2009

CFP: Children and the Law Junior Faculty Workshop Call for Papers


Children and the Law Junior Faculty Workshop

July 16 -17, 2009

The Frances Lewis Law Center at Washington & Lee University is sponsoring a workshop for junior scholars working on legal issues related to children. The workshop will be held this summer on the campus of Washington & Lee in Lexington, Virginia.
More info on Feminist Law Professors blog here.

RR

May 11, 2009 in Abortion, Child Abuse, Child Support (establishing), Child Support Enforcement | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack (0)