Family Law Prof Blog

Editor: Margaret Ryznar
Indiana University
Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Sunday, January 3, 2016

"Super Dads" are Challenging Gender Roles in South Korea

From Business Insider:

Chung Sang-hoon, 34, has taken a year off of his intensive sales job to stay at home with his children.

Taking paternity leave was previously unheard of in South Korea. Now, a small group of "superdads" are joining a growing, government-encouraged movement.

"The reason I took childcare leave is I want to be different from my father's generation," Sang-hoon said. "Everything is definitely worth it, from preparing breakfast to doing the dishes. I can live for the sake of values I find important."

His wife, Jeon Jeong-mi, said her husband taking paternity leave has been a huge help to her career.

"I can work without feeling pressure," she told Reuters. "I don't have to worry about home. And I do not have to go home early. Also, I do not need to feel sorry for my kids whenever I go to work in the morning."

These "superdads" are challenging gender roles in South Korea, where men are expected to work long hours and be minimally involved with raising kids.

The country's rigid gender expectations have led South Korean women to believe they're being punished in the workplace because they may have to take time off to care for their kids down the road, per Reuters.

As a result, South Korea has the lowest birth rate of wealthy nations, which is why South Korean President Park Geun-hye has made increasing the number of men who take paternity leave a priority — both to address the low birth rate and to give women's careers a boost.

Read more here.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/family_law/2016/01/super-dads-are-challenging-gender-roles-in-south-korea.html

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