Family Law Prof Blog

Editor: Margaret Ryznar
Indiana University
Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Call for Papers

Download Call for Papers here (Friday, September 19th Deadline) for the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting.

MR

August 28, 2014 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

The Family Law Scholars and Teachers Conference

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

            We would like to invite you to a working-paper conference that we are planning to hold in the days before the AALS mid-year family law conference in Orlando next summer. Our group, the Family Law Scholars and Teachers Conference, has been known in the past as the Emerging Family Law Scholars and Teachers Conference (EFLS). That group held an annual conference for the past eight years, but until now has been limited to junior scholars. This year we are opening the conference to scholars at all levels of seniority, and are hoping that many of you can join us.

            The conference will take place on Monday, June 22, 2015, in Orlando, Florida—the day of the AALS workshop’s opening reception. Since our conference will be held earlier that day, these two events will not conflict. We will be hosted for the day by Florida A&M University College of Law, which is just a few minutes’ drive from the Doubletree Hotel that hosts the AALS workshop.

            For those of you who are not familiar with the EFLS conference, the main purpose of the meeting is to allow family law scholars to receive detailed, constructive feedback on their work in a supportive, collegial environment. In addition, the meeting is a forum to meet others in the field and talk about teaching, service, developments in the law, and other relevant themes raised by participants. Scholars present their work—either in its very initial form (an incubator session) or in its more developed form (a work-in-progress session)—in intimate groups. We have a very strong norm that participants carefully read drafts of the papers in advance of the sessions, and there are no formal presentations. Many of us feel that this has been a very meaningful conference that significantly contributed to our development as scholars and teachers.

            Although we have decided to open up the conference to scholars at all levels, we are still committed to preserving the conference’s intimate and supportive character. Therefore, we can accommodate only 45 participants, selected on a first-come-first-served basis. Additionally, although we will try to fulfill all requests for an incubator or work-in-progress session, if space is limited, we will give some preference to junior scholars. As always, there is no registration fee, and people only need to pay for their meals and accommodation. The Doubletree Hotel will give the discounted rate for rooms a couple of days prior to the conference.

            We will open up the registration and submission, via TWEN, in February 2015. For now, if you would like to receive announcements about the conference, please sign in on our TWEN page. To do that, go to “Add Courses” and select “Family Law Scholars and Teachers 2015 Conference.” If you have already selected the course in 2014, we will migrate your e-mail automatically and you do not need to register again. You should expect to receive an e-mail with further information about submissions and registration in February 2015.

            If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact co-chairs Erez Aloni (ealoni@law.whittier.edu) or Jessica Dixon Weaver (jdweaver@smu.edu).

Best wishes,

FLST Planning Committee

 

Erez Aloni

Anibal Rosario Lebron

Dara Purvis

Sarah Swan

Bela Walker

Jessica Dixon Weaver

August 28, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Girls Don't Cause Divorce

From Slate:

For years, researchers have observed a correlation between U.S. couples with daughters and their likelihood of divorce, which tends to be somewhat higher than for couples with sons. In both academic circles and in popular culture, this trend wasn’t simply considered a positive association, but a clear causal relationship: a notable portion of research held that daughters were actually the ones causing divorces, because fathers prefer boys and only want to stay married to women who give birth to them. But thanks to a new study on the roots of relationship conflict, this belief — which now seems not only reductive, but also blatantly sexist — might start to recede from view.

According to a study published in the journal Demography on Wednesday, the association between divorce rates and daughters might actually have less to do with what happens in a female child’s lifetime and more to do with what happens before birth. Researchers Amar Hamoudi and Jenna Nobles posit that because female embryos tend to be hardier than male embryos, daughters are more likely to come of relationships that are already in some sort of turmoil during pregnancy. Sons, on the contrary, would be less likely to be born into such relationships, because male embryos do not have the same robustness as their female counterparts.

Read more here.

MR

August 5, 2014 in Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 4, 2014

Pot & Child Custody

From DelawareOnline:

DENVER – A Colorado man loses custody of his children after getting a medical marijuana card. The daughter of a Michigan couple growing legal medicinal pot is taken by child protection authorities after an ex-husband says their plants endangered kids.

And police officers in New Jersey visit a home after a 9-year-old mentions his mother’s hemp advocacy at school.

While the cases eventually were decided in favor of the parents, the incidents underscore a growing dilemma: While a pot plant in the basement may not bring criminal charges in many states, the same plant can become evidence in child custody or abuse cases.

Read more here.

MR

August 4, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Fernández & Wong: "Free to Leave? A Welfare Analysis of Divorce Regimes"

Raquel Fernández & Joyce Cheng Wong have a new paper entitled "Free to Leave? A Welfare Analysis of Divorce Regimes."  Here is the abstract:

During the 1970s the US underwent an important change in its divorce laws, switching from mutual consent to a unilateral divorce regime. Who benefitted and who lost from this change? To answer this question we develop a dynamic life-cycle model in which agents make consumption, saving, labor force participation (LFP), and marriage and divorce decisions subject to several shocks and given a particular divorce regime. We calibrate the model using statistics relevant to the life-cycle of the 1940 cohort. Conditioning solely on gender, our ex ante welfare analysis finds that women would fare better under mutual consent whereas men would prefer a unilateral system. Once we condition not only on gender but also on initial productivity, we find that men in the top three quintiles of the initial productivity distribution are made better off by a unilateral system as are the top two quintiles of women; the rest prefer mutual consent. We also find that although the change in divorce regime had only a small effect on the LFP of married women in the 1940 cohort, these effects would be considerably larger for a cohort who lived its entire life under a unilateral divorce system.

MR

August 2, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 1, 2014

Marital Home

From JDSupra Business Advisor:

We know how difficult it is to remain under the same roof with your spouse during a divorce.  Generally, during an initial consultation, clients always ask us what is the quickest way to remove his/her spouse from the marital residence. Unfortunately, since generally neither party has a superior right to the home, the answer is that neither party can remove the other from the house.  We know that this answer is often frustrating to hear.

Read more here.

MR

August 1, 2014 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)