Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Is Shared Decision-Making A Better Route for Effective Communication?

Elizabeth Moran, a relatively new staff attorney for the ABA's Commission on Law and Aging, has an interesting article in the latest issue of Bifocal, Vol. 42, Issue 6 (July-August 2021).  Moran outlines several key recommendations made by the National Guardianship Network during their May 2021 national Summit.  She points to two of the 22 recommendations that bear on "effective communication" for persons with disabilities, especially when involved in court proceedings that may affect any determination of "legal capacity."  

Recommendation 1.2 advocates for courts and state authorities "must ensure that all judicial proceedings" that can impact a determination of an adult's legal capacity must provide "meaningful due process" which includes respect for the individual's "preferred communication accommodations."  

Recommendation 2.4 provides that federal and state authorities "should recognize that supported decision-making can be a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities act of 1990, as amended, in supporting an individual in making their own decisions and retaining their right to do so."

Moran acknowledges there is weak understanding within some courts for how supported decision-making will work, even as she advocates strongly for its use.  She writes:

While there is growing awareness of “supported decision-making” (SDM), particularly as an alternative to guardianship, SDM does not have a universally accepted legal definition. It is, however, becoming a more commonly understood concept of integrated supports which honors an individual’s integrity of choice with the underlying principle that, with enough appropriate supports and services, nearly every individual has the capacity to make decisions. When people use SDM as a communication accommodation, they use family members, friends, professionals, and others they trust and who know them well to help them understand the situations and choices they face, but with the ultimate choice left to the adult. This eliminates a substitute decision-maker and maximizes autonomy for the individual who may need communication supports for speaking, reading, writing, or understanding in order to meaningfully participate. The need for this kind of support necessarily includes and can provide for meaningful participation in court services, programs and activities.

For more on this important topic, read Moran's full piece, "Something to Talk About: Supported Decision Making and Access to Justice for All."

July 21, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Federal Statutes/Regulations, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, July 19, 2021

UVA Law Professor Naomi Cahn: Why Conservatorships Like the One Controlling Britney Spears Can Lead to Abuse

 Prolific writer Naomi Cahn, who in 2020 moved from George Washington to University of Virginia School of Law as a distinguished professor and director of UVA's Family Law Center, has a new commentary on the potential impact of the Britney Spears' litigation challenging her California-based conservatorship.  Professor Cahn observes at the outset:

Spears’ case is unusual: Conservatorships are typically not imposed on someone who doesn’t have severe cognitive impairments, and Spears has toured the world, released four albums and earned US$131 million, all while deemed legally unfit to manage her finances or her own body.

Despite the unique circumstances of Ms. Spears' circumstances, her case demonstrates the lack of national data tracking such "protective" proceedings.  Professor Cahn writes:

Broad powers and “anemic” oversight make conservatorships subject to multiple forms of abuse, ranging from the imposition of unnecessary restrictions on the individual to financial mismanagement. Nothing can be done if no one finds out about the abuse.

 

A 2010 U.S. government report identified hundreds of allegations of physical abuse, neglect and financial impropriety by conservators. Most of them related to financial exploitation, and that, in turn, often meant that the victim’s family was affected, losing not just expected inheritances but also contact with the person subject to the conservatorship.

 

A 2017 New Yorker article on abusive guardians highlighted the case of April Parks, who was sentenced to up to 40 years in prison for financial conduct related to numerous conservatorships she handled. She was also ordered to pay more than half a million dollars to her victims.

 

But beyond these anecdotes, no one even knows the magnitude of the problem. That’s because conservatorships are subject to state law, and each state handles the imposition of them as well as data collection differently. And a 2018 Senate report found that most states are unable to report accurate data on conservatorships.

Professor Cahn sees Britney Spears' case as generating a national outrage that was missing from earlier anecdotal indications of problems for older adults trapped in "protective" proceedings.  She concludes: 

Spears may soon find herself free of her conservatorship. Regardless, her situation has already put a spotlight on the potential for abuse – and it may lead to a better system for those who genuinely need the assistance.

July 19, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, July 11, 2021

Analyzing Britney Spears' Conservatorship: How Should Courts Respond to Allegations of a Toxic Guardianship?

This summer, J. Collin Fulton, a rising 2L student at Dickinson Law, with a prelaw background in journalism, has been doing a fantastic job while working on projects with me.  He put together this very thoughtful overview of how Britney Spears' concerns, arising in the context of the California-based proceeding, may be relevant to the larger analysis of guardianships and conservatorships across the nation.  

Joshua Collin Fulton 2021From J. Collin Fulton:

In the areas of guardianship and conservatorship law, perhaps no recent case has captured the attention of the American public as thoroughly as the conservatorship of Britney Spears. The Pop singer’s conservatorship was established in California in 2008 and has become one of the best-known examples of how, under U.S. law, a person can have the management of both their personal life and financial affairs placed under the control of a court-appointed guardian/conservator, typically as a result of mental or physical conditions or advanced age.

While a legion of Ms. Spears’ fans has routinely called into question both the necessity and nature of the singer’s conservatorship, it was the release of the New York Times' 2019 documentary “Framing Britney Spears” which brought the details of Ms. Spears conservatorship to the attention of the broader public. I personally became aware following the Times’ publication on June 22nd of an article detailing how Ms. Spears herself feels about the conservatorship. Based on court records acquired by the NYTimes, the article details both Ms. Spears opposition to the continuance of her conservatorship in its present form as well as Ms. Spears claims concerning some of the effects the conservatorship has had on her life. Based on court documents going back to 2014, the NYTimes article reports that:

  • Spears “feels the conservatorship has become an oppressive and controlling tool against her.”
  • Spears has informed the court that, as a result of the conservatorship, she felt compelled to perform against her will and compelled to stay at a mental health facility against her will.
  • The conservatorship restricted a broad range of Ms. Spears decision making, ranging from who she was allowed to date to the manner in which she could decorate her home.

Ms. Spears’s June 23 public testimony further cast the conservatorship in a negative light. In the testimony, the singer claimed that, against her will, she was forced to take mood-altering drugs and forced onto contraception. Ms. Spears again called for her conservatorship to be ended and generally for the laws surrounding conservatorships to be changed. This call has been echoed by numerous other singers in support of Ms. Spears, including Justin Timberlake, Halsey, Brandy, and Mariah Carrey, as reported by the BBC.

Given what Ms. Spears claims has transpired as a result of her conservatorship and the public support she has received, I became deeply curious about how a conservatorship can actually be terminated. Given the complexity of guardianship/conservatorship laws, this is a question without a simple answer.

First, state laws vary significantly regarding who, how, and why a person can be placed under a guardianship/conservatorship. As Ms. Spears’s case takes place in California, I focus there.

There are two types of conservatorships under California law: Lanterman-Petris-Short (LPS) and Probate conservatorships, the latter of which is exemplified by Ms. Spears’s situation.

Such conservatorships are typically permanent affairs in California; however, they can be terminated in the following ways:

  • The conservatorship ends due to the death of the conservatee.
  • A judge may end the conservatorship upon petition to do so resulting from the conservatee regaining the ability to manage their own affairs (The argument Ms. Spears appears to be currently making).
  • A conservatorship of the estate can be ended if the conservatee ceases to possess any assets to protect.

Learning this raised a new question for me: why would a court allow a conservatorship such as Ms. Spears’s to continue given her allegations? I believe the answer to this question lies in the purpose of guardianship/conservatorship laws.

This purpose is perhaps best exemplified in the California “Handbook for Conservators,” which the state mandates for conservator cases. The Handbook has a clear message for every new conservator: “You have been appointed conservator because someone – your parent, spouse, child, or other relative or friend – needs help, and you are willing to lend a hand.” This simple message, in my opinion, captures the thought behind guardianship and conservatorship laws. There are, sadly, situations in which a person is unable to manage their affairs. Guardianships and conservatorships allow for a legal redress to such situations, enabling courts to appoint a trusted individual to provide assistance in such circumstances.

The California Handbook also highlights another important fact central to the functionality of conservatorships: “The position of conservator is one of great trust and responsibility. The court and conservatee are trusting you to follow the law and to act in the conservatee’s best interests.” Given the incredible responsibilities assumed by a guardian/conservator, it is indeed imperative that guardians/conservators execute their duties with the utmost understanding and respect for the individual's own values and goals, while also complying with the legal obligation to make decisions in the best interest of the individual they have been appointed to protect.

With the purpose of guardianships/conservatorships now understood, I turn back to Ms. Spears and the question of why, given her allegations, her conservatorship still remains. The answer is, simply, that legal process such as this take time.

Just as a court needed to consider a multitude of factors in determining that Ms. Spears should become a conservatee, the court must now perform proper inquiries into the allegations that Ms. Spears has raised and then determine an appropriate response to take based on the validity of these allegations. This is true not only for Ms. Spears, but for any person in a guardianship/conservatorship situation. Guardianships/conservatorships are serious affairs, ones in which a person’s ability to control their own lives have been taken from them and handed to another individual, hopefully one who is trustworthy and will act in their best interest. Should doubts emerge about the actions of a guardian/conservator, or indeed the necessity of an established guardianship/conservatorship itself, investigating the situation thoroughly is paramount to the integrity of not only the guardianship/conservatorship in question but also the legal system of guardianships/conservatorships at large.

Mr. Fulton concludes:  I thus believe that while a quick response from the court may satiate the immediate public outcry for change, a proper inquiry which establishes the truth and, in turn, enables the court to act based on the facts will not only improve Ms. Spears' situation but enhance public knowledge on the current state of guardianship/conservatorship laws in the United States.

July 11, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Early Recommendation: Read "The Problem of Alzheimer's" by Dr. Jason Karlawish


The Problem of Alzheimer's A number of years ago, I had an email correspondence going with Dr. Jason Karlawish, Professor of Medicine, Medical Ethics and Health Policy, and Neurology at the University of Pennsylvania.  He was writing and speaking in intelligent, understandable ways about complex issues in degenerative neurocognitive disorders.  

My sister brought him back to my attention, as she had just heard Brené Brown's podcast interview with Dr. Karlawish.  Dr. Karlawish recently published an important book on The Problem of Alzheimer's.  I immediately ordered the book and I'm still reading, but I can tell this is -- and should be -- an important resource for anyone trying to understand or explain the Alzheimer's or other progressive impairments in cognition.  Frankly, that means all of us.  He is taking on an essential question:  "What's a good life when you're losing your ability to determine that life for yourself?"  The subtitle of the book helps explain the scope:  "How science, culture, and politics turned a rare disease into a crisis and what we can do about it."

I'm sure I'll write more hear about this book as I plunge ever deeper into the clear prose, organized in logical chunks, where I'm finding "gold" embedded on every page.  It is not a soothing read, but that is exactly why it is so important.

June 30, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Statistics | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, June 17, 2021

New Elder Justice Resource Guide

The New York courts have released a new Elder Justice Resource Guide, "the result of collaboration between The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Center for Elder Justice at the Hebrew Home at Riverdale and the New York State Unified Court System’s Division of Policy and Planning, and ... provide[s] a list of resources, information and support for New York’s judges, court personnel, and other legal professionals."

The 136 page guide is available online or as a pdf, and covers various topics. "The Elder Justice Resource Guide includes information about elder abuse, accessible courtrooms for older adults, capacity and confusion, effective communication, and available resources for older adults experiencing abuse. The Guide also includes a comprehensive directory of national, state, and local services available to older adults."  (I particularly was interested in pages 12, 16-18 where Stetson's own Eleazer Courtroom is mentioned!)

June 17, 2021 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other, State Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

Webinar on Resuming SNF Visitation & Spotting Trauma

Register now for this  June 18 (3 eastern) webinar, NORC Webinar: Resuming In-Person Visits During COVID-19: Tips for Identifying Trauma, Potential Abuse, and Supporting Residents

In recognition of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) join us to learn how to identify and respond to signs of trauma and potential abuse or neglect and support residents as Ombudsman programs resume in-person visits during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Laura Mosqueda, a national and international expert on elder abuse and neglect, will provide tips for Ombudsman programs conducting in-person visits, such as signs of trauma in response to isolation and loss during the pandemic and potential signs of abuse and neglect. She will also share recommendations for supporting residents and available resources. As an accomplished physician and researcher, Dr. Mosqueda has testified in front of Congress and has been invited to the White House several times to discuss elder justice initiatives. She has taken the lead on landmark studies to identify forensic markers of abuse and neglect and serves as a volunteer representative for the California Long-Term Care Ombudsman program.

Attendees will also hear from two Ombudsman program representatives as they share their experience resuming in-person visits and highlight what they observed upon reentry, how they supported residents, tips for visits, lessons learned, and successful practices.

Click here to register.

June 8, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Programs/CLEs, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 20, 2021

Colorado: "Former Police Officers" Facing Criminal Charges For Conduct in Arrest of Woman with Dementia

On May 19, 2021,  the District Attorney's Office covering Loveland Colorado announced criminal charges against two officers who had already been removed from the force after details became public about their June 2020 arrest of a 73 year-old woman with dementia.  The primary arresting officer was charged with second degree assault causing bodily injury, attempt to influence a public servant (both being felony charges) and official misconduct, a misdemeanor, while a second officer who arrived midstream, was charged with misdemeanors, of "failing to intervene" in a case of excessive force, failing to report the use of force, and official misconduct, according to records from the DA's office.  

More details here:

 New York Times:  Former Police Officers Charged Over Arrest of Woman with Dementia

The Coloradan:  Arrest Documents - Former Loveland Officer Downplayed Force in Report on Karen Garner

 

May 20, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 17, 2021

Texas Families Seek Legislative Changes to Better Assure Accountability for Seniors' Safety

Families in Texas have been hard at work the last two years, responding to the deaths of loved ones in Dallas-area senior-living communities who may have been killed by a serial murder suspect.  Organizing under the name "Secure Our Seniors Safety," they have pressed for an array of legislation to compel care-giving communities to provide greater accountability, including reporting suspicious activity such as employee concerns, where there is potential risk to vulnerable adults.  One of the bills, "Marilyn's Law," or HB 723 was named after one of the suspect's victims. Marilyn's daughter had initially been told her mother, who was living in a care center, had died of "natural causes." The death certificate was later amended, but the daughter only learned from news reports that her mother may have been one of the suspect's victims, suffocated with a pillow.

From a recent Dallas News article:

The first bill filed in response to a string of slayings at Dallas-area senior living communities passed the Texas Senate on Thursday and now awaits Gov. Greg Abbott’s signature.

 

For the families who say their loved ones were killed by a serial murder suspect, it’s a moment more than two years in the making. . . .

 

The bill passed Thursday is named for Pangburn’s mother, Marilyn Bixler. Marilyn’s Law, or HB 723, was introduced by two Collin County lawmakers — Sen. Angela Paxton and Rep. Jared Patterson — after The Dallas Morning News first reported Pangburn’s story.

 

The new law will require officials to notify next of kin if a cause of death is amended.

The bill was signed into law by the Texas Governor on May 15, 2021.  

Chemirmir, a suspect in at least 17 murder, theft or attempted murder cases, awaits trial because of delays related to Covid-19,  according to news reports, including national news profiles. 

For more on related legislation pending in Texas, see "Death Certificate Bill Filed in Response to Chemirmir Case Passes in Austin." 

 

 

May 17, 2021 in Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Caregivers React to Loveland Colorado Police Treatment of Aging "Shoplifter"

I've had several recent opportunities to talk with individuals serving as primary caregivers for family members who have varying stages and types of neurocognitive disorders, including but not limited to age-associated dementia.  One common concern in these conversations has been "that could have been my family member."

They are referring to news reports and body-cam videos of two officers in Loveland, Colorado in June 2020, as they apprehended, handcuffed, and took down "in a controlled manner" (the officers' description) a disoriented 72-year old woman. The officers were intent on arresting the woman following a report of her alleged "shoplifting" attempt of $14 dollars' worth of items at a local Walmart.   

According to the federal civil rights suit filed on April 16, 2021, the actions of the police officers fractured Karen Garner's left arm, dislocated her shoulder, and terrified her.  She was left for hours, crying and begging to go home while handcuffed in a booking cell, with no medical assistance offered or provided.  One booking room video shows the officers laughing and commenting about the body-cam footage.

Such conversationa explained what many caregivers were thinking about when they learned what happened to the "frail little thing" (the officer's word), the 5 foot tall, 80 pound woman who had earlier been diagnosed with "mild" dementia:

  • It could have been a lawyer's uncle, who has PTSD following return from tours of military duty and an IED injuty in Afghanistan;
  • It could have been a colleague's father, who was diagnosed with FTLD causing him to lose inhibitions, sometimes involving confusing behavior in public;
  • It could have been an older friend who recently needed help because she could not find her way through the "new" self-checkout system at the grocery store;
  • It could have been a member of my family, as my sister related to me a story I had not heard before, about how our mother, distracted by a cell-phone call, walked out of a grocery store without paying for groceries and didn't realize that until after she had loaded them into her car;
  • It "was" a man in his  60s with early onset dementia who wandered away from his home one night, only to be arrested for loitering and placed in a special containment area of the jail, where he was beaten to a pulp during the night by his cellmate (as I have written about before, here).

Continue reading

May 4, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Crimes, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Discrimination, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Estates and Trusts, Ethical Issues, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Cases | Permalink | Comments (1)

New Fact Sheet from NCEA

NCEA has released a new fact sheet: Red Flags of Elder Abuse OPIOID USE

Experts believe that the incidence of elder mistreatment has grown with the rising opioid epidemic.1 Older people commonly experience chronic health conditions and associated pain for which opioids are prescribed. Mounting reports of opioid misuse have been documented among elders addicted to drugs and their adult children who steal their medication. Though there is little data to quantify the breadth of the problem, reported incidents of opioid misuse often result in financial exploitation and may be accompanied by other, co-occurring forms of mistreatment such as emotional abuse and physical harm. Despite the complexity of this issue, opioid-related elder abuse is an injustice that we can address and prevent. Health care professionals, in particular, must be aware of the signs of abuse to identify mistreatment and intervene to avert harm to their older patients.

The fact sheet offers 10 red flags, advice from experts, and a number of resources.

 

May 4, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, April 23, 2021

New Research Briefs from NCEA

The National Center on Elder Abuse has released two new research briefs.  First, Mistreatment of Chinese Elders offers these takeaways;

  • Despite being referred to as the “model minority”, elder abuse is prevalent in the Chinese community.
  • Core values of filial piety and family harmony profoundly shape the response to elder mistreatment among this population.
  • Definitions of psychological abuse and financial exploitation in the Chinese community are unique compared to other populations.
  • Experiences of immigration and acculturation shape an older Chinese immigrant’s experience of elder mistreatment.
  • Intervention recommendations include involving family members in educational/support programs, improving communication between elders and adult children, emphasizing traditional cultural values, and increasing care and support for victims, especially women.

After discussing a number of factors, the research brief offers tips for working with the victims and adding to the body of research.

The next research brief, Mistreatment of Korean Elders , offers these takeaways:

  • Filial piety, family harmony, and patriarchal values profoundly shape the response to elder mistreatment in the Korean community.
  • Definitions of psychological abuse and financial exploitation among Korean elders are unique compared to other populations
  • Immigration and acculturation experiences shape an older Korean’s experience of elder mistreatment.
  • Korean elders are less likely to seek outside help or disclose family problems.
  • Promising intervention strategies include providing educational information on financial abuse, improving communication between elders and adult children, involving indigenous healthcare providers and religious leaders in elder abuse education, and increasing help-seeking behaviors.

After the discussion of the issues, the research brief offers tips for working with Korean elders and adding to the body of research.

April 23, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Television | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Elder Justice Policy Highlights

The National Center on Elder Abuse has released the latest elder justice policy highlights.  Here is a summary:

The elder justice legislation found in this document was elicited and finalized from the National
Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) Listserv and independent websites in February 2021. The
compilation is intended to reflect highlights across the nation and does not include all legislation related to elder justice. However, updates will be sent biannually and states are encouraged to send updates on significant legislative action to Ageless Alliance. This document reflects activity in 15 states and highlights at the federal level.

In addition to summaries by state, the highlights include links to the individual legislation. 

 

Oh and btw, mark your calendars now for the 2021 World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, June 15, 2021.

April 15, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Roundup on Nursing Home Articles

First, have you read this article from the New York Times? Maggots, Rape and Yet Five Stars: How U.S. Ratings of Nursing Homes Mislead the Public

Twelve years ago, the U.S. government introduced a powerful new tool to help people make a wrenching decision: which nursing home to choose for loved ones at their most vulnerable. Using a simple star rating — one being the worst, five the best — the system promised to distill reams of information and transform an emotional process into one based on objective, government-blessed metrics.

The star system quickly became ubiquitous, a popular way for consumers to educate themselves and for nursing homes to attract new customers. During the coronavirus pandemic, with many locked-down homes unavailable for prospective residents or their families to see firsthand, the ratings seemed indispensable.

But a New York Times investigation, based on the most comprehensive analysis of the data that powers the ratings program, found that it is broken.

Then, a couple days later, another article from the New York Times, this time about California, California Sues Nursing Home Chain, Saying It Manipulated Ratings System

California prosecutors sued the country’s largest chain of senior living communities on Monday, accusing the company, Brookdale Senior Living, of manipulating the federal government’s nursing-home ratings system.

* * * 

The lawsuit is among the first of its kind to accuse nursing homes of submitting false information to Medicare’s ratings program. The system assigns stars — one being the worst, five being the best — to the nation’s more than 15,000 nursing homes.

Health News Florida explained that COVID Cases Plummet 83% Among Nursing Home Staffers Despite Vaccine Hesitancy, "Federal records show a steep decline in staff cases since December, when health care workers at thousands of nursing homes began getting their shots. Still, many are reluctant to get vaccinated."

Then, this New York Times article from Canada,  Elderly, Vaccinated and Still Lonely and Locked Inside

Long-term care homes, as they are called in Canada, were prioritized for the first precious doses of vaccines, to few objections — they were ground zero for the pandemic’s cruel ravage. Around 66 percent of the country’s terminal Covid-19 victims lived in nursing homes, among the highest rates in the world.

But while the vaccines have given the majority of nursing-home residents protection from death by the virus, so far they have not offered more life....

March 24, 2021 in Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, International | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Webinar on Robocalls

DOJ's Elder Justice Initiative is offering this webinar, Tackling Transnational Robocall Scams: The Importance of State and Federal Partnerships  on April 13 at 2 eastern time. Here's info about the webinar

Consumers report losing approximately $500 million per year to phone scams. Phone scammers often impersonate government officials, such as officials with the Social Security Administration, FBI, IRS, and local law enforcement entities. This webinar will discuss what the scams are and how they work. It will delve into local and state law enforcement’s vital role in the fight against these scams. It will also describe investigative techniques that state and local law enforcement can use in the fight against transnational scammers. Finally, it will touch upon public education tools that can help community members protect themselves from scammers.  

Speakers:

Jolee Porter, Assistant US Attorney, Northern District of Georgia, currently detailed to the Transnational Elder Fraud Strike Force at the US DOJ Consumer Protection Branch

Senior Special Agent Jon Heslep, Office of Inspector General, Social Security Administration 

Detective Margaret Moore, Aiken Department of Public Safety, South Carolina

To register, click here.

March 23, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Programs/CLEs, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 19, 2021

Podcasts on Scams

Educate yourself on the various scams, how they work and how to protect yourself by listening to these 7 podcasts from the New York Times. 7 Podcasts About the Art of the Scam "delve deeper into scam stories you may already know from the headlines ... and also illuminate some less familiar, like the extraordinary saga of how thousands of people were conned into blowing their life savings on a plot of worthless land in California."

March 19, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Other | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Guardians' Role in Fighting Elder Abuse

Check out this new factsheet from the National Center on Elder Abuse, Role of Guardian Standards
in Addressing Elder Abuse. This five page fact sheet answers 16 wide-ranging FAQs and includes resources both within some of the FAQs and at the end of the fact sheet. It's worth checking out!

March 16, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Upcoming Webinars

Register now for two upcoming webinars.

1. Webinar: Financial Protection for Older Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic set for Feb 23, 2021 at 1 eastern. 

Join experts from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and ACL on Tuesday, February 23 at 1 pm ET for a free webinar on financial protection of older adults during the COVID pandemic. The FCC will begin the program with an overview of coronavirus-related phone scams targeting older adults. The CFPB will share resources to help older adults address the financial impact of the pandemic. HHS will conclude the webinar with a discussion of the role of the aging services network.

Click on FCC live link to join the webinar on Feb 23 at 1 eastern.

2. A series of 3 webinars from the DOJ Elder Justice Initiative;

  • March 4th 2pm EST  |  Programs for Older Adults Who Have Experienced Financial Exploitation. Learn about three distinct programs designed specifically for older adults who have experienced financial exploitation. Register here.
  • March 23rd 2pm EST  |  The Path Forward: One MDT’s Journey to Address the Impact of Racial Injustice on Their Work. The Hennepin County Minnesota Adult Protection/Law Enforcement Multi-Disciplinary Team “MDT” provides a model case study of the impact of racial injustice on their work as an elder abuse MDT in Minneapolis. Register here.

  • April 13th 2pm EST  |  Tackling Transnational Robocall Scams: The Importance of State and Federal Partnerships Features a Federal and State partnership that successfully fought against computerized autodialing “robocall” scammers.  Register here

February 18, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Programs/CLEs, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Two More Resources on Fighting Elder Abuse

In case you missed these, here are two recently released resources on fighting elder abuse. The latest elder abuse roll call video is on an elder abuse guide for law enforcement interviewing older adults.  It is part of a series of roll call videos. all of which are available here. 

As well, there is an update to a toolkit, Supports and Tools for Elder Abuse Prevention (STEAP) Initiative Toolkit Updates. The updated toolkit can be accessed here.

 

February 9, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Webinar on Guardianships

Mark your calendars now for this important webinar, Advancing Guardianship Reform through Working Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders (WINGS) on Feb. 9, 2021 at 2 eastern.

Improvements to state adult guardianship systems can include the promotion of less restrictive options, strengthening rights, and ensuring accountability. To make real changes in law and practice requires the collaboration of courts with stakeholders in the legal, aging, and disability communities. Working Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders (WINGS) or similar collaborative entities in many states have begun to forge positive changes.  

The 2020 American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging WINGS Briefing Paper makes key findings and recommendations about the effectiveness of WINGS and the need for their long-term, systemic support. This webinar will highlight the WINGS Briefing Paper findings and recommendations, and summarize guardianship reform obstacles and efforts and the development of WINGS. Presenters will also offer tips to establish or enhance WINGS in your state.

Click here to register.

February 3, 2021 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, State Statutes/Regulations, Webinars | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, January 28, 2021

GAO Report on State Reporting of Elder Abuse

A new GAO report was released last week. ELDER JUSTICE: HHS Could Do More to Encourage State Reporting on the Costs of Financial Exploitation offers fast facts, highlights and the report, all available for download or access via the links.  Here are the fast facts:

Financial exploitation of elders—illegal use of their funds or property—affects the victims, their families, and society. Estimated financial costs to victims are in the billions.

Most state-run adult protective services agencies have provided some data on financial exploitation of elders to the Department of Health and Human Services. But it's hard to collect the data because

not all incidents of exploitation are reported to state agencies

victims can be reluctant to implicate family members or caregivers

HHS and state data systems may not align

We recommended that HHS work with state agencies to improve the data on financial exploitation.

The highlights, fast facts, and recommendations are all accessible from here.  The full report is available here.

Consider this from the report:

Studies estimate some of the costs of financial exploitation to be in the billions,
but comprehensive data on total costs do not exist and NAMRS [National Adult Mistreatment Reporting System]  does not currently collect cost data from APS agencies. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found actual losses and attempts at elder financial exploitation
reported by financial institutions nationwide were $1.7 billion in 2017. Also, studies published from 2016 to 2020 from three states—New York, Pennsylvania, and Virginia—estimated the costs of financial exploitation could be more than $1 billion in each state alone. HHS does not currently ask states to submit cost data from APS casefiles to NAMRS, though officials said they have begun to reevaluate NAMRS with state APS agencies and other interested parties, including researchers, and may consider asking states to submit cost
data moving forward. Adding cost data to NAMRS could make a valuable contribution to the national picture of the cost of financial exploitation. Recognizing the importance of these data, some APS officials GAO interviewed said their states have developed new data fields or other tools to help caseworkers collect and track cost data more systematically. HHS officials said they plan to share this information with other states to make them aware of practices that could help them collect cost data, but they have not established a timeframe for doing so.

January 28, 2021 in Consumer Information, Crimes, Current Affairs, Elder Abuse/Guardianship/Conservatorship, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink | Comments (1)