Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Using Advanced Age as a Factor in Rationing Health Care? Consider the Arizona COVID-19 Crisis Plan

I've recently returned from a week in Arizona with family.  I managed to arrive in Phoenix just in time for a surge in COVID-19 cases, traffic headaches connected to President Trump's campaign visits, a couple of new wildfires, and a few more degrees up the summer temperature gauge.  Probably the most newsworthy part of the trip was the announcement by Arizona authorities that the state was activating a COVID-19 crisis plan that involves triage -- or "rationing" as some  people interpreting the plan are calling it.  One component of the Arizona plan involves "protocols for scarce resource allocation."  An Arizona public statement describing the protocols attempts to reassure the public (emphasis provided with blue color):

If resources are sufficient, all patients who can potentially benefit from therapies will be offered therapies. If resources are insufficient, all patients will be individually assessed. No one will be categorically denied care based on stereotypes, assumptions about any person’s quality of life, or judgement about a person’s “worth” based on the presence or absence of disabilities.


All patients, regardless of resource availability, will be treated with respect, care, and compassion. Triage decisions will be made without regard to basis of race, ethnicity, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability, veteran status, age, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity, quality of life, or any other ethically irrelevant criteria.

When resources become inadequate -- implicit in the Governor's recent news conferences -- triage involves a color-coded system of triage "priority scores."  According to the statement, "All patients will be eligible to receive critical care beds and services regardless of their triage score, but available critical care resources will be allocated according to priority score, such that the availability of these services will determine how many patients will receive critical care."

The guidelines indicate health care providers must make an active assessment of the "patient's goals of care and treatment preferences.  It is imperative to know whether aggressive interventions such as hospitalization, ICU admission or mechnical ventilation are consistent with a patient's preferences.... All hospitalized patients should be asked about advance care planning documents, goals of care, and are strongly encouraged to appoint a proxy decision-maker (e.g., medical durable power of attorney... or health care agent) if not previously in place.  Patients in nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, other long-term care settings, and outpatient care settings should also be asked about their goals of care and advanced care planning documents.... If advance clare planning documents are in place and available the healthcare provider should verify the patient's goals of care and treatment preferences remain the same....."

Will the patient's age, especially an advanced age, be relevant to a Arizona's Covid-19 crisis plan?  On the one hand, the guidelines indicate "age" is  expressly "removed ... as a specific factor for Triage Priority scores or Triage Color Groups."  On the other hand, when determining the Triage Priority Score, points assessed must reflect an evaluation of whether the patient is "expected to live more than 5 years if patient survives the acute illness [zero points added]" or whether death is "expected wtihin 5 years despite successful treatment of acute illness [2 points added]." If "death [is] expected within 1 year regardless of successful treatment of the acute illness," 4 points are added.  The patient's prioritization for critical care resources is best with a low score (1 to 3 total points), while priority is reduced to "intermediate" (4 to 5 points) or "lowest," if they are assessed with more than 6 total points.  Further, "age" is implicitly involved as the prioritization process somehow examines the specific patient's "opportunty to experience life stages (childhood, young adulthood, middle years, and older years)."

These are obviously tough calls in any health care assessment contect, but especially so in the middle of a pandemic.  Public health professionals have experience with these kinds of assessements. I suspect that many families also have engaged in a type of informal assessment when serving as a loved one's health care spokesperson or agent. 

My sister and I were thinking about last summer as I visited this summer.  Last summer, the two of us talked about similar factors when making the call on whether our mother would have hip-surgery at age 93 following a fall-related fracture.  The doctor said that without the surgery our mother was unlikely to walk again because of pain; with the surgery there was a significant chance she would be able to walk without pain.  She ended up sailing through the surgery -- and began taking steps again the same day.  Ironically, probably because of her increasing dementia, she had no fear of falling nor any memory of the surgey and thus was soon fully ambulatory (although she did sometimes substitute a walker for her occasional cane) and remained so for all but the last few days if the next six months of life.  That took her into the summer of 2019 in Arizona.

If the cornonavirus pandemic had occurred in the summer of 2019, and if safe access to hospitals and surgery were the issues, my best guess is Mom would probably have had a "high" score on any health care triage assessment -- in other words, not good news.  We are glad we never confronted decisions about respirators or ventilators.  We do know that our very elderly mother had a much better quality of life with major surgery than she would have had without it. Just one case, of course.  Again, tough calls (and yes, expensive calls for Medicare) with or without a pandemic to complicate the decision process.  

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2020/07/using-advanced-age-as-a-factor-in-rationing-health-care-consider-the-arizona-covid-19-crisis-plan.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicare | Permalink

Comments

What is worrisome is that according to the National Center for Health Statistics' Life Tables, persons age 90 have a life expectancy of 4.6 more years (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_03.pdf). So those age 90 and older may automatically have 2 pints chalked up against them under the Arizona triage criteria, regardless of their overall medical status.

Posted by: Charlie Sabatino | Jul 2, 2020 7:47:48 AM

Too bad the score couldn't include whether the patient was a smoker or not ... Someone who diligently avoided smoking might get a score that permits a smoker to get the Covid treatment because being a smoker wasn't a consideration. Or did I mis-read something that addressed smoking as being a criterium in scoring.

Posted by: Jennifer Jess Young | Jul 7, 2020 6:42:59 AM

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