Tuesday, May 19, 2020

It Isn't Just "Nursing Homes"

One way to frustrate anyone operating an assisted living, life plan community, continuing care community or other congregant living situation is to refer to their centers as "nursing homes."  Many people have a fixed, negative mental image of a nursing home.  And when it comes to quality of life indexes, senior living settings that offer options for meal arrangements,  independent living units, daily activities, participation in off-campus events, recreational outlets (such as swimming, gyms, billiards, or golf), assistance with a range of activities of daily living, assistance with memory-based tasks such as medications, etc., typically defy the negative stereotypes. At least they do for those who actually take the time to visit.  

But, sadly, the potential for wide transmission of Covid-19 does not spare the more "active" senior living models. A Philadelphia Inquirer May 18 article reports that Coronavirus Invaded These South Jersey Senior Communities, Despite Managers's Best Efforts.  Some of the locations described in the article I recognize as very high-end, continuing care communities. But money alone isn't insulation.  How money is used can be a factor.  Some especially interesting excerpts from this article:

  • A facility’s government quality rating, whether it was a for-profit business, and how much of its budget came from Medicaid, did not predict whether it had cases, said David Grabowski, a health-care policy professor at Harvard University whose study looked at whether nursing homes had any cases, not how many. He said facilities with more staff, PPE and ability to group patients with similar disease status together might have better odds of avoiding major outbreaks.
  • Most of [the cases as one continuing care community in New Jersey, known as ] Lions Gate . .  . have been in its nursing home, but there have been 18 in assisted living and one in independent living. Their first case was on March 30, again in a staff member. As the numbers mounted, Lions Gate started testing more widely and found cases among people without symptoms. [CEO Susan Love] does not know how the first employee got it or how it spread. The community tried to confine sick patients to one floor of the nursing home and to assign specific employees to care only for them. Some assisted-living residents were also seen by outside private aides and hospice workers. The average age of the 12 residents who died was 93, Love said. Four were on hospice care. Only five residents who tested positive went to the hospital. Most did not want to go
  • [At another New Jersey CCRC],  seven of the 13 residents who died were on hospice. None wanted aggressive medical care, [Executive Director] Clancy said. He takes comfort in knowing that "we abided by the wishes of every single one of them who passed away.”
 

The highlighted sentences in the last two paragraphs raise an important concept I haven't seen discussed often in Covid-19 themed articles.  A friend of mine who is a lawyer who works outside of aging issues asked me recently why I thought the death rate "in" nursing homes or other senior care facilities was "high."  I think one possibility is that such facilities have honest conversations with new residents and their families about "end of life decisions" and it is entirely possible the residents and their family members have given clear, written directions that they do not want to be transferred to hospitals in the event of a life-threatening development.  

 

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2020/05/it-isnt-just-nursing-homes-.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases | Permalink

Comments

Professor:

I find your concluding remarks insightful. Where succeeding to the care of my parents, I also succeeded to the care of my aunt (father’s sister). During early April, 2020, her senior living facility contacted me and, she having just recovered from pneumonia and suffering from COPD, asked if I would like to revise her DRN Order. Presuming that this order was executed by my father at the consent of his sister, I declined to make any change in that order. However, it was most certainly a sobering experience. Although accustomed to drafting Living Wills and Advance Directives, those are executed in my presence and I know the express wishes of the declarant. In this case, I was left to “presume” those remained the wishes of the declarant.

Posted by: Tom N. | May 19, 2020 9:30:34 AM

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