Thursday, May 14, 2020

"Hey, how about giving it a rest, Bro?" -- The Importance of Achieving Consensus in Family Care Giving

Earlier today I had a conversation with someone about family dynamics during the Covid-19 crisis in the context of caring for elderly family members.  The caller is the one who holds Power of Attorney for her older family member and who has been doing a lot of tough stuff, including care decisions for more than an year, decisions such as whether assisted living was appropriate, whether the beloved (but annoying) cat can go to assisted living with the family member, whether the larger family will somehow find a way to pay for a single occupancy room when the resident's own finances aren't enough, and whether the family member's increasing dementia will require additional one-on-one support, also requiring additional money.  

But the call wasn't about any of those complicated parts of third-party decision-making challenges.  It was about "can I tell my brother to back off? He's driving me crazy. He's 600 miles away from here. On the one hand he says, its up to me to make the decisions; on the other hand, when he hears from [our loved one] about being unhappy, he tells me what I should have done. Why didn't he say that before I had to make a decision?" 

And then, not ten minutes after that conversation, I talked with a friend who is a director at a long-term care facility.  She told me about how a big blowup occurred, because an adult child of one of their residents "found out" about the parent's Covid-19 diagnosis because of Facebook.  The adult child called the director, upset about not hearing this information directly.  The director, staying calm, tried to explain that the decisions about timing of communication on this topic were made by the resident's spouse -- and suggested the child call the spouse for more details.  That in turn resulted in the spouse calling the director, in tears, about what the child had said.  

So, perhaps in any context of long-term care, we all need to recognize that caregiving decisions are complex, fact specific, often requiring quick action.  If the person who is the center of the care, the one who is loved (right?),  and about whom the family is worrying, has made his or her own decisions about who is the Power of Attorney or other agent, we just need to take a deep breath before we criticize.  

Or as one person wrote to me, in still another caregiving context, he was lucky he was "not having to navigate this alone," because he, his brother and sister were working hard to use their respective backgrounds (medicine and law) to strive for family consensus when called upon to make tough decisions for their parents.  But when consensus isn't possible -- and that will happen -- he knew that one or more of them might have to "give it a rest" with well-meaning, post-decision advice.  

 

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2020/05/hey-how-about-giving-it-a-rest-bro-the-importance-of-achieving-consensus-in-family-care-giving.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Ethical Issues, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment