Sunday, March 29, 2020

US Has More Elders Living Alone

I blogged a couple of times about social isolation's impact on elders as we move through this pandemic. Imagine social isolation when you live alone and how that compounds your loneliness. This report from Pew Research, released before the pandemic swept the U.S., reports that elders in the U.S.  live alone in greater numbers than other countries.  Older people are more likely to live alone in the U.S. than elsewhere in the world shows that:

Living with an extended circle of relatives is the most common type of household arrangement for older people around the world, according to a recent Pew Research Center study. But in the United States, older people are far less likely to live this way – and far more likely to live alone or with only a spouse or partner.

Let me share some stats from the article:

  • "In the U.S., 27% of adults ages 60 and older live alone, compared with 16% of adults in the 130 countries and territories studied."
  • "U.S. adults ages 60 and older also are more likely than their counterparts around the world to live as a couple without young children at home. Almost half of Americans in this age group (46%) share a home with only one spouse or partner, compared with three-in-ten globally (31%)."
  • "Globally, living in extended-family households – those that include relatives such as grandchildren, nephews and adult children’s spouses – is the most common arrangement for people 60 and older. "

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2020/03/us-has-more-elders-living-alone.html

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