Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Stories About Alzheimer's

Two recent stories about Alzheimer's caught my eye, and I wanted to share them with you here.  The day after Thanksgiving, the Today Show ran a story, Caregiver for Alzheimer's Patient Shares Family's Struggles. The caregiver wife tells the story of their lives and the financial impact when her husband, a lawyer, was diagnosed at age 61 with early onset Alzheimer's. The summary describes the story, "Millions of Americans selflessly care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease and one family is opening up about their struggles on TODAY. Many people are calling for a nationwide program for caregivers, reports special anchor Maria Shriver." Senator Amy Klobuchar appears in the story, as her dad has Alzheimer's. The story mentions pending bills in Congress, including the Alzheimer's Caregivers Support Act. The link to the 3:22 minute video is available here.

The second story, an opinion piece in the New York Times, The Unending Indignities of Alzheimer’s   aired December 1, 2020. It highlights the obstacles family members face in trying to find the necessary care for the individual with Alzheimer's....

But while his family, and his physician, agree on the need for more advanced care, his health insurers do not. Medicare does not generally cover long-term nursing home care. Medicaid does, but only when it deems those services “medically necessary” — and that determination is made by insurance agents, not by the patient’s doctors. The state of New Jersey, where my parents live, recently switched to a managed care system for its elderly Medicaid recipients. Instead of paying directly for the care that this patient population needs, the state pays a fixed per-person amount to a string of private companies, who in turn manage the needs of patients like my father. On paper, these companies cover the full range of required offerings: nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and a suite of in-home support services. In practice, they do what most insurance companies seem to do: obfuscate and evade and force you to beg.

The author writes how the family is piecing together the care the best they can.  She writes "[t]he real problem is not my father’s level of functionality; it’s the lack of available Medicaid beds and the absurdly high cost of any meaningful alternative. For example, there’s a lovely assisted-living facility just two miles from my parents’ apartment. But it costs $8,000 a month, on average, and does not accept my father’s insurance."

BTW, know someone who is a caregiver? Even though National Caregivers' Month (November) is behind us, thank a caregiver.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2019/12/stories-about-alzheimers.html

Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare | Permalink

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